Oregon emerald. (Eugene, Or.) 1909-1920, November 06, 1915, Page Three, Image 3

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    HOMECOMING'S UTEST
IS CAMPUS LUNCHEON
Enthusiasm For 0. A. C.-Oregon
Game Is Running High
Throughout State.
A luncheon on the campus is the
newest development in plans for en
tertaining visitors during home-com
ing day.
The Women’s League and the Eu
gene Alumnae are the chief promot
ers of the idea. Mrs. Datson, presi
dent of the Eugene Alumnae, has
called a meeting for Monday. The
student refreshment committee, of
which Louise Bailey is chairman, will
meet with them. Together, accord
ing to Max Sommer, they are going
to frame up one of the greatest grub
fests ever known at Oregon. It’s
coming off rain or shine, for if it
should rain the “eats” will be trans
ferred to the men’s gymnasium.
Mr. Finneran, editor of the Eu
gene Daily Guard, just came home
from a trip in the northern part of
the state. He says the people are
enthusiast everywhere about the
game and that he looks for a record
braking crowd, November 2 0.
A tentative program has been
mapped out. Friday afternoon, if
plans materialize, is to be an open
class day. The alumni will be invit
ed to visit classes and see whether
the instructors have deviated any in
imparting knowledge.
In the evening conies the parade.
Students and old Oregon men will
have a grand pajama serpentine end
ing at the football field. There will
be one big rally by the light of the
freshmen bonfire.
Saturday morning trains will be
met by the band and automobiles.
About 10:30 the alumni will proba
bly gather under a leader, perhaps
Don Orput, and rehearse some stunt
for the game. And after that, the
campus luncheon.
The “Order of the O’’ may escort
the team to the field. Batley has
evolved a new idea for a nifty stunt
between halves. He promises a sur
prise.
An informal ball at the armory is
the main attraction for 'Saturday eve
ning. In conjunction with this a re
ception will be given in the same
building, with headquarters for dif
ferent classes and a chance for old
class mates to meet one another.
Refreshments will be served.
Sunday the University buildings
are to be thrown open for inspection
by the visitors.
i
■ft "ft -85 8- 85 4^ 9^ 8i 4p
# 4
4 ANNOUNCEMENT. 4
4 - 4
4 The sophomore class foot- 4
4 ball team challenges the £
4s freshman class team to a £
4s game of football to be played ■#
# on Kincaid field next Satur
4 day morning, November 13, •#
# at 10 a. m. All men who are 4
4 at present out for varsity 4
4 football, or who have been -ft
4 out will be barred from tak- #
# ing part in the class game. 4
4 Also all freshmen who play- 4
4 ed in the recent game with *
4 the O. A. C. freshmen are in- 4
4 eligible to play. I 4
4 4
44444444444444444
-- f I \
Y. W. Will Hear Mrs. A. Norman.
“A Story of the Kentucky Moun
tains” will be the subject of a talk
to be given by Mrs. A. Norman at the
Y. W. C. A. Bungalow Tuesday, No
vember 9, at 4 p. m. *
Mrs. Norman has spoken before
the Fortnightly club, the missionary
societies of the M. E. and Presbyter
ian churches, and the Mothers’ club.
Mrs. R. C. Clark in speaking of Mrs.
Norman says:
‘‘Her part is always most delight
ful in the Fortnightly club.”
Mrs. S. D. Allen says: ‘‘Mrs. Nor
man presents a Bible story very dra
matically and creates a great deal of
enthusiasm. She is most interesting
ami has the power of telling a story
exceedingly well.”
All girls are cordially invited to
attend.
At the University of Illinois, 10,
000 seats have been reserved for the
football game with Minnesota, oa Oc
tober 30.
-J <k.
*
HOME SCIENCE MENUS 1
+-*
Menus for Thursday and Friday.
THURSDAY
Breakfast
Fruit Coffee Riee
Whole Wheat or Graham Gems
Luncheon
Cream of Vegetable Soup
Bread Stieks
Apple Sauce Sponge Cake
Dinner
Meat Balls with Horseradish
Fried Sweet Potatoes
Cream Caulifower
Pear and Nut Salad
Lemon Cookies Coffee
FRIDAY
Breakfast
Fruit Rolled Oats
Coffe or Cocoa Toast
Luncheon
Tomato Bisque Crackers
Muffins Jelly Tea
Dinner .
Chicken Pie
Mashed Potatoes or Boiled Rice
Cabbage and Pimento Salad
Apple Pudding Coffee
Recipe for Cream of Vegetable
Soup—1 cup cooked rice, 1 cup stew
ed tomatoes, 5 cups soup stock, 1
small onion, 1 potato, 1 carrot, sev
eral pieces celery, sprig of parsley,
1 cup whole milk, pinch of soda, 1
large spoonful each butter butter,
flour. Salt and pepper to taste.
Mince Vegetables—Cook in soup
stock, add rice and soda. Rub but
ter and flour together, add soup and
seasoning. Add hot milk, just be
fore serving.
Beat balls made from one thi d
each of veal, pork and beef are a
most welcome change from the old
time hamburg and saugsage.
Cocoa is an excellent substitute for
coffee in the morning.
Chicken Pie—Make a rich dough
and cut small biscuit, placing closely
over top of pie. This is superior
to the old way and is more easily
served. Chickens are inexpensive
just now and should be used fre
quently in the menu while the price
is reasonable. They may be roasted
with dressing, fricassed, or creamed
and served with either mashed po
tato or rice.
Lean veal and a little lean pork
cooked with chicken for pie or to
cream, can scarcely be detected in
flavor and lessens the cost. All
meat, however, is less expensive now,
veal raning from 10 to 20 cents a
pound, pork from 15 to 1 8 cents,
beef from 8 to 20 cents, while lamb
can be had for from 10 to 18 cents
a pound. Many of the cheaper cuts
of meat are as digestible and nu
tritious and as well fitted for nour
ishment of persons in good health as
are the costlier cuts.
Salmon and halibut are about the
only fresh fish in the local market
at present, and are 10 and 12%
cents a pound.
In vegetables, we have quite a va
riety, almost all of which are home
grown and can be had fresh every
day. The prices, too, are very rea
sonable. Summer squash, cabbage
and cauliflower (by the way, cauli
flower is said to be cabbage with a
college education), can be bought
at 5 cents for a fair sized head. Cel
ery leaf and head lettuce are plenti
ful at 5 and 10 cents a head. To
matoes are still very good in flavor
and will probably be in market a few
days longer. They sell for 10 and
15 cents a basket. Hubbard squash
carrots, beets, dry onions, are in mar
ket every 'day. Parsnips, also, have
made their appearance.
Grapes, pears and apples are the
only home grown fresh fruits. Ap
ples of the king variety are cheapest
and are very satisfactory for cook
ing, green or raw. Grapes will seen
be gone, but are quite plentful now
and are not expensive.
The Home Science club is compos
ed of the following 18 ladies: Mrs.
F. M. Day, Mrs. Floyd Booth, Mrs.
Warren D. Smith, Mrs. E. J. Frazier,
Mrs. C. D. Rorer, Mrs. F. L. Cham
bers, Miss Nettie Chase, Mrs. J. M.
Miller, Mrs. R. T. Burnett, Mrs. R.
C. Clark, Mrs. C. H. Edmunson, Mrs.
D. C. Sowers, Mrs. Fred E. Smith,
Miss Jennie Gilkinson, Mrs. H. B.
Carter, Mrs. F. L. Stetson, Mrs. A. R.
Tiffany, Mrs. F. M. arter.
ANNOUNCEMENT.
The Women’s Athletic associa
tion will meet Tuesday afternoon at
5 o’clock in the women’s gymnasium.
The basketball outlook for this year
will be discussed and every member
Is urged to be present.
Washington sent 22 men to battle
California.
!
REGISTERED
OPTOMETRIST
FACTORY
ON PREMISES
BURGESS OPTICAL (?
EXCLUSIVE OPTICIANS
591 WILLAMETTE ST. EUGENE,OREGON
We can supply you with anything in Athletic or
Gymnasium Supplies
EUGENE GUN CO.
770 Willamette Street
Laundry—
Eugene Steam
Give us your patronage. We will try to do the rest.
Phone One-Two-Three
The New Fall Styles
Are Here
Xll the models in Suits and
Overcoats for men and
young men. Stamped with
that originality which be
longs alone to
Kuppenhei mer
Clothes
$18 to $30
Kuppenheimer Clothes made
to your measure if you wish.
MALLORY HATS in all the
new colorings and styles, $3.
Roberts
Bros.
COPYRIGHT 19IS
THE HOUSE OF KUPPENHEIMER
Holeproof Hosiery, 6 pairs,
guaranteed 6 months.
BURDEN
&
GRAHAM
Eugene Shoe Headquarters, 828
Willamette
Bronze Gypsy Boots.
Beaded Kid Party Slippers
The Famous K Boot
The Famous
Nettleton Shoes
For Men.
Gymnasium shoes modeled after
the Famous Bolin Last
Exclusive Agents for famous
Ground
Gripper Shoes
Broad toe, low heel, button
shoes built on the famous
Bolin Last. Shoes to suit
the most fastidious taste.
WADE BROS.
The Home of Hart Schaffner
fe? Marx Clothing
Wing’s Market
THE HOME OF
Good Meats, Fish and Groceries
FRESH FRUITS AND GROCERIES
675 Willamette Street.
Phone 38
Telephone 229
UNIVERSITY PHARMACY
Luther Thompson, Prop, and Mgr.
Cor- Eleventh and Alder
Parker Fountain Pens; A. D. S. Goods; Hudnuts Soaps;
Perfumes and Toilet water; Eastman Kodaks; Ensign
Cameras; Seneca Plate Cameras; Kodak Developing and
Printing.
TRY THE
VARSITY
Barber Shop
llth AND ALDER STREET
NEAR THE CAMPUS
BLAIR STREET MARKET
CLYDE UILLETT, PROP.
Fresh and Salted Meats of all kinds-Dressed Poultry
Sausage, Bacon and Hams our specialty
Wholesale and retail
Phone 1106 385 Blair Street