Oregon emerald. (Eugene, Or.) 1909-1920, September 25, 1915, Page Three, Image 3

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    DU SMITH COLLECTS
CUBE SPECIMENS
Fossils, Coal, Mineral Water
and Building Stones Part
of Collection.
Dr. Warren D. Smith, head of ttie
Department of Geology ana a]so al
lied with the Bureau of Mining and
Geology at Corvallis, investigated
this semester the stratigraphy of
the Cascade Mountains, working
from south of Douglas County to
the Columbia River, and traveling
by train, auto, horseback and foot.
“The specimens which I collected
on this trip are of general interest,”
said Dr. Smith. “They include fos
sils, specimens of coal, samples of
mineral water, and building stones.
Among the fossils probab]y the most
interesting are the fossil plants found
in considerable numbers at Jasper,
Oregon.”
One of the fossils gathered on this
trip is a piece of volcanic rock, so
hard in composition that a nail can
be driven in without the structure
breaking.
Using this summer’s research work
as a basis, Dr. Smith will write a
chapter to be printed in a bulletin
on the “Geology of the Cascade
Mountains,” to :be issued by the
Bureau of Mines and Geology, locat
ed at Corvallis. This Bureau is in
dependent of both institutions, but
employs geologists from both.
“I also took a trip over the Co
lumbia Highway from Portland' to
The Dalles,” said Dr. Smith. “One
thing of interest that I saw was a
fir tree trunk standing upright—just
the way it grew—in the midst of
consolidated volcanic ash. This
tree, though partially petrified,
showed distinct annual rings of
growth.”
IDr. Smith read a paper on “Ge
ologic and Physiographic Control in
the Philippines” before the Geo
logical Society of America in San
Francisco and assisted for a short
time at the Oregon Mine exhibit iii
the Palace of Mines at the Exposi
tion.
HISTORIC PRINTING PRESS
INSTALLED FOR PRESSMEN
The first printing press used west
of the Rockies is 10 be used by the
first University printing class. The
old press is installed in the journal
ism printing room in McClure Hall.
The department has also a brand
new Chandler & Price which will do
most of the printing but the old
Washington Hand Press will be used
to some extent by the laboratory
classes.
The press was given to the Jour
nalism department by H. R. Kincaid,
through his son Webster Kincaid. Mr.
Kincaid for years was publisher of
the Oregon State Journal, according
to Professor Allen.
“The old press has a very interest
ing history,” continued Mr. Allen. “It
was used first in Oregon City and in
use 10 years before the old printing
press which is now on exhibition at
the San Francisco Exposition. George
H. Hims, secretary of the Oregon His
torical Society is now writing a his
tory of the old press. When finished
a copy of it will be framed and plac
ed over the press.” In addition to this
old press one of the new $300 ser
ies of Chandler and Price job-press,
is placed in the Journalism plant.
The printing press will be run by
the students taking the course in'
printing labratajry, under the dir
ection of A. J. De Lay, who for eight
years has been printer of Washburn
College, Topeka, Kansas.
The press will print some Univer
sity matter but no general commer
cial work wijl be printed except per
haps small jobs for students as sta
tionery. ° ° o "o " ' °° "•
to have in the near future a sylinder
to have in the near future a sylinder
press and a type-setting machine,
with which the Oregon Emerald can
be printed.
## #>£ #*#######***
* 3 *
# Band Men, Attention £
# - ° #
# ^11 band men, or ^nvone #
4S playing a hand (instrument, §.
# turn out for first meeting of #
# the year, in Hall of Villard. at #
# 4 o’clock, Monday afternoon. #
Do not bring instruments. #
« #
LAW SCHOOL TO FORM
LEGAL 1 BUREAU
Petty Cases to Be Solved By
Students. Nucleus For
Library Ordered.
The Law Department of the Uni
versity is soon to organize a legal
aid bure'au, to which petty cases may
be brought. These cases wil] be
worked out by the students, thus
affording them some actual experi
ence.
The Oregon Law School is up to
the standard. A three year course
is offered, there are four in the fac
ulty, and the students are taking
twelve hours of law, leaving only
four or five hours for art and
science. While this year there are
not so many students as usual, they
are taking a greater number of
hours.
Pour thousand dollars worth of
books are to be purchased for the
new law library. They will include:
Standard law and reference books,
reports of State cases, and collec
tions of English and American
cases. The Board of Regents has de
clared itself in favor of the pur
chase, and an order has been placed
with Bancroft-Whitney Company of
San Francisco for these books. The
department already has four of five
law journal.
±ne scnooi in me pasi nas suner
ed from lack of advertising. This
year the law catalogue was sent to
every high school and library in the
State, to the judiciary and legisla
ture, and to every college in the
country.
At present the Jaw department is
housed in the south wing of the
men’s dormitory, but in the future
expects to occupy, with the library,
a floor of the proposed Education
Building.
RHODES EMMS DATED
October 5 and 6 Announced for
Scholarship Tryouts, But No
Candidates As Yet.
Examinations for the Rhodes
scholarship will be given October 5
and! 6. Where the examination for
Oregon will be hejd depends on the
number of candidates and will be de
cided by the committee of selection.
“No candidates have been heard
from yet,” said Registrar Tiffany,
“but any college man may take this
examination if he has completed at
least his sophomore year. At this time
no Greek is required although an ex
amination in this language must be
passed before the student enters Ox
ford.”
The examination is not competitive
but qualifying, and its purpose is to
give assurance that the elected schol
ar is up to the standard of the first
examination which the University
requires for the B. A. degree.
One Rhodes scholar will be select
ed from the students who pass this
test. These scholarships are to the
value of $1500 per year, and are ten
able for three years. The only re
quirements to make any man eligible
is that he shall be an upper-classman,
unmarried, and not more than twen
ty-five years old.
Colleges in Oregon whose students
may be examined are: University of
Oregon, McMinnvillTe, Willamette.
Reed uand “Pacific Colleges.
Notice
Only Freshmen girls are to wait
until after their physical examina
tion to report for gymnasium.
The Emerald Wants To Tell
You Something—Subscribe
PHILHARMONIC SOCIETY
PUNS RECITAL SERIES
Madame Gadski and Gogorza
Two Attractions to Appear
Later in Season.
(C. Snell)
One of the most ambitious courses
of recitals ever attempted in Eugene
will be given this year by the Philhar
monic Society according to the plans
announced at their first meeting for
this year, which was held Monday
evening in Villard Hall.
At the first meeting of the series
on December 12th, the prima donna
soprano Madame Johanna Gadski wijl
sing. A cantata, “The Rose Maiden”
by Co wen, will be given by the society
Jan. 18th under the direction of
Profesor Ralph Lyman, Dean of the
School of Music at the University.
The last of the course will be a
recital by Don Emilio de Gogorza, the
baritone.
All of the concerts will be held in
the new armory.
Dr. G. S. Beardsley, president of
the Society, appointed as nominating
committee, Mrs. L. H. Johnson, Mrs.
J. N. Waterhouse and: Dr. Lloyd L.
Baker. The nominations for officers
for the present year will be reported
at the next meeting which is to be
hejd in Villard Hall next Monday
evening at eight o’clock.
Although this first meeting was
well attended others are invited to
join. A chorus of one hundred and
fifty voices is hoped for.
The freshman-sophomore “rush” at
the University of Southern California
Ll»is year will be a pushball game,
believed to be the first ever played in
Southern California. The great
leather ball to be used cost several
hundrd dollars.
EASTERN ART TO BE SHOWN
BY ARCHITECTURAL CLUB
The Architectural club has receiv
ed from prominent Boston architects,
si* sets of drawings which will be
placed on exhibition. They consist of:
Smith Hall at Harvard, Arlington
Oity Hall, First National Bank Of
Epswich, Diamond Rubber Co., Bos
ton and the Oliver High School of
Lawrence, Mass.
In the collection are also eoine
watercolor drawings by the Boston
Interior architect, Dillard Bill. These
together with a book on architecture
by Peabody, were secured through
the courtesy of R. Clipston Sturgis,
president of the American Institute
of Architects.
The students and instructors of
the department will give a formal ex
hibit of their work on October 7.
Ye brawny babbling freshmen!
Ye lank, lugubrious specimen!
We’ll meet you as of yore,
We’ll crush you on old State Field
And wipe you in your gore.
—From an ojd colege verse.
MARX
Barter
Stop
BATHS
Next Door to Savoy
WHEN IN NEED OF SUPPLIES CONSULT THE
UNIVERSITY PHARMACY
Just one block off the campus at the corner of East
East 11th and Alder
Our Goods are all Clean and Just as
Up-to-date as any in the city
Headquarters for I. P. Cover and Fillen
Phone 229
TRY THE
VARSITY
Barter Stop
llth AND ALDER STREET
NEAR THE CAMPUS
THE OBAK
A FULL LINE COLLEGE PIPES. B. B. B. , PETERSON AND
COMOYS. BILLIARDS, BOWLING, CIGARS
PHONE 48 AND GET THE SCORE
58-60 9th AVE. EAST.
TEACH YOUR DOLLARS TO HAVE MORE CENTS
—DO YOUR TRADING AT THE
Quick Delivery Grocery
Corner llth and Alder Phone 141.
TURPIN
TAILOR AND CLEANER.
Eighteen Years’ Experience. Cor. 12th and Alder
I earnestly solicit your patronage. Your clothes wi*l re
main nicer and last longer, when cleaned by my sanitary
methods.
LADIES’ WHITE WOOL GOODS A SPECIALTY.
I DO NOT USE GASOLINE.
G. W. SHAFFNER,
University Agent.
WADE BROTHERS
The Home of
Hart Schaffner & Marx
GOOD CLOTHES
— Mme. Schaffer—
Hairdressing
Shampooing
MANICURING AND FACIAL MASSAGE
OVER DODGE’S DEP’T STORE
W. 8th and Olive Phone 888
Try Our
White Chocolate Creams
35c They are New and Fine. 75c
THE OREGANA PACKS CANDIES IN FANCY BOXES,
WHICH MAKES EVERY CHOCOLATE
TASTE TWICE AS GOOD.
SEE OUR WINDOW
Cor. 11th and Alder.
OF COURSE
WE WANT YOUR BUSINESS
FISHER
Laundry Company
1580 WILLAMETTE STREET
Use the Fast Frequent Train
OREGON ELECTRIC
RAILWAY
to the
5th Annual State Fair
Week of Sept. 27—Oct. 2.
Reduced Round-Trip Fares
From All Oregon Electric Stations. Tickets Sold Daily,
Sept. 23 to Oct. 2, Return Limit Oct. 6.
From:
Eugene ..$2.80
Fayetteville . 1.00
Albany . 1.10
Harrisburg.2.15
Junction City. 2.30
Tigard . 1.00
Wilsonville ......... 1.20
Orenco .. . 2.15
Corvallis.$1.55
Forest Grove.2.50
Hillsboro. 2.30
Tualatin . 1.50
Tulsa . 1.80
Woodburn.70
Donald. .95
Corresponding reductions from other points. Special Days
—Monday, Children’s; Tuesday, Women’s, Good Roads;
Wednesday, Salem Woodmen’s, State Societies*, Thursday,
Portland Transportation, BRks; Friday, Press, Oregon
Manufacturers’, Scandinavian; Saturday, Shriners, Orange,
Pioneers.
H. K. KNIGHT, Agent, Eugene, Oregon.
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