Oregon emerald. (Eugene, Or.) 1909-1920, September 18, 1915, Page Seven, Image 7

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    CHET FEE IS THIRD
' BEST ALL-ROUND
ATHLETE III AMERICA
Oregon Track Captain Cops Big
Place in Decothlon. Others
Make Mark at Meet.
Chet Fee, captain of Oregon's track
team, proved himself to he the third
best all-around athlete in the United
States, when he annexed 64 42.1
points in the Decathlon at San Fran
cisco during the National meet this
summer. The two men who prevented
Fee from realizing first honors are
Richards of the Illinois Athletic club
and Brundage, a middle Western en
try. Richards and Brundage were
both members of the American repre
sentation at the Olympic games at
Stockholm three years ago, Richardis
taking the high jump. These men reg
istered 6953 and 6457 points respect
ively.
In practice the Pendleton product
has been able to do better in every
event than he did at San Francisco,
except the pole vault. In the Decath
lon he ran the 100 meters in twelve
and a fifth and covered the 400
meters in 53 2-5. In the pole vault he
went 12 feet and in the high jump
five feet five inches. He did his hard
est event, the 1500 meters in 5:30
but he made up for this slow time by
hurling the discuss 99 feet 10 inches
and putting the shot 35 feet. The
high sticks were negotiated in 1 6 1-5
and in the javelin the best heave was
15 feet 9 inches. Had Chet been
throwing the spear up to form he
would have taken second place. For
any toss near his former mark of 179
feet would have given him a comfort
able margin.
Fee placed in every meet he enter
ed. Besides his record in the Nation
al Championships he garnered six
points in the far western meet with
a first in the javelin and fourth in
the vault. In the junior events he
tossed the javelin for a second.
Guy Hobgood of O. A. C. and Sam
Rellah, the veteran Multnomah man
were the other stellar performers for
the Northwest. Hobgood took first in
the mile and two mile in the far west
ern meet. In the National Champion
ships he ran third to Hannes Kohle
maien, of New York, and Oliver Mil
lard, of the Olympic Club—5 milers.
This was pronounced one of the most
stirring races ever run on the coast,
due to the hair raising finish in which
a yard stick would have covered all
three runners. “Hoby’s” achievement
was all the more remarkable for the
fact that he had only a few days to
train for the longer event.
Bellah covered himself with glory
by winning the pole-vault in the far
western meet at 12 feet 6 inches, and
then capturing first honors in the
National Championships with a leap
of 12 feet 9. Sam also took fourth
ir the javelin throw at the far west
ern meet. «
“Moose” Muirnead did not acquit
himself in the expected style. He cap
tured fourth in the high sticks in the
far wetsern meet when Fred Kelly
tied his own world record of fifteen
seconds flat. After this meet “Moose
could not get into form.
Hummel of Multnomah, Cole of O.
A. C., Clyde of Washington, also
brought home points for the North
west. Hummel took second in the
440- hurdles and fourth in the 2 20
toppers at the far-western meet. In
the Junior events he annexed second
honors in the low sticks. Harry Cole
could not get his discus away from
him in form. He took only one place
—a fourth in the far-western meet.
Paul Clyde placed second to Hobgood
in the far-western mile.
Bill Hayward, Oregon's great track
coach took the boys south and a great
deal of their success may be attribut
ed to Bill’s handling.
t__
JOURNAL JOKESTER OFFERS
OREGON THE “ONCE OVER”
Rex Lampman, who edits the once
over column and the “Alibi” on the
Oregon Journal, has offered the for
mer column to the University De
partment of Journalism for one day
about the first of the week in October.
“The kmd of material desired is
the dash story, the short joke, funny
poetry—in fact anything that goes
to make up a freak column,” said
Professor Dyment, of the Journalism
Department. The lead in this issue
will be a dash story similar to the
ones now used by Mr. Lampman. Af
ter material has been handed in, the
best will be chosen and forwarded to
Portland, where Mr. Lampman will
give it the “once over” and—if satis
factory—place it In this special col
umn.
Students are asked to leave all ma
terial with Mr. Dyment as soon as
possible.
Mies M. L. CUMMINGS
AIMS AT POPULARITY
FOR GIRLS’ ATHLETICS
New Head of Department
Pleased With Attitude of
Westerners,
Miss Mabel L. Cumimngs, the new
head of the Women’s Physical Train
ing department, arrived! in Eugene
early in the week, and is busy bring
ing the different gymnasium and phy
sical training classes up to their us
ual working efficiency.
Miss Cummings comes from the
Illinois State .Normal University,
where she was he aid of the depart
ment of Physical Training during the
past 9 years. Miss Cummings attend
ed the Boston Normal school of Gym
nastics, which is now the department
of hygiene at Wellesley College and
is a graduate of the University of
Chicago and of the Rush Medical Col
lege, of Chicago.
When qeustionetd concerning her
work for the ensuing year Miss Cum
mings said, “I want to make this de
partment of Physical Training more
popular with the students than it has
been heretofore and increase their
interest in athletics. It seems to me
that such courses should play a large
and pleasing part in the undergrad
uate life of the women. Of course I
am used only to eastern conditions
but there, athletics fills one of the
largest and most interesting places on
the campus. At Wellesley the senior
Tree Dance is one of th biggest fea
tures of Commencement Week. So
far I am very much pleased with the
situation here and especially with the
western attitude toward athletics for
women.”
CAMPUS NOTES
Charles Betts, C. C. Baker, Neil
and Hugh Ford, all students at the
University of Oregon last year, have
entered Stanford this fall.
Chi Omega house held their formal
luncheon Friday noon. Peacock feath
ers were used in the decorations anidi
the favors were white leather date
books and peacock feathers. Thurs
day morning a breakfast was given
at the Osburn.
Kappa Kappa Gamma entertained
with a dinner dance Thursday even
ing. Toy balloons and red butterflies
were used in decorating and the fav
ors were Oregon Seal Pins. Tuesday
night a juvenile party was given and
Wednesday noon there was a lunch
eon at the Country club.
Tri Delta entertained Thursday
evening with a Dutch dinner dance.
One of the enjoyable features of the
evening was a solo by Miss Margaret
Spangler, dressed in Dutch costume.
Wednesday noon the Tri Delta girls
were hostesses at a military dinner
given in the Wisteria room of the
Hotel Osburn. Miss Juanita Wilkins
entertained with a charming lawn
party at her home Thursday evening
for Tri Delta,
Thursday noon Alpha Phi enter
tained with a snow luncheon. The dec
orations were in white and green and
the favors were little sleds and snow
men holding candy boxes. Miss Naomi
Williamson, wiho has studied in the
Emerson school of Expression, read;
several selections. On Friday morn
ing a breakfast was given at the Mill
race.
Mrs. Stewart of Portland; is acting
as house mother at the Ohi Omega
house unt'l the return of Mrs. Char
les Gray from San Francisco, where
she is hostess in the Oregon building.
TheNewFallStyles
COPYRIGHT 1915
THE HOUSE OF KUPPENHE1MEW
Are Here
All the models in Suits and
Overcoats for men and
young men. Stamped with
that originality which be
longs alone to
Kuppenhei mer
Clothes
$18 to $30
Kuppenheimer Clothes made
to your measure if you wish.
MALLORY HATS in all the
new colorings and styles, $3.
Roberts
Bros.
Holeproof Hosiery, 6 pairs,
guaranteed 6 months.
SAVOY
THEATRE
TODAY
“CROAKY
Frank Daniels the inimit
able musical comedy com
edian, who has made thous
ands laugh by the comedy
he has sent over the foot
lights, will make his first
appearance in pictures in
“Crookey.” A 5-Act picture
that you will enjoy.
10tf Admission 5^
Patronize Emerald Advertisers
TEACH YOUR DOLLARS TO HAVE MORE CENTS
—DO YOUR TRADING AT THE
Quick Delivery Grocery
Corner 11th and Alder_ Phone 141.
Lane County Fair
EUGENE OREGON, SEPTEMBER 22, 23, 24, 25
MOTOR CYCLE RACES SEPT. 22
HARNESS AND RUNNING RACES SEPT. 23, 24, 25
EXHIBITS OF ALL KINDS
RAY W. STANTON PAUL F. SPRAGUE
LARY MANN HEINIE HEIDENREICH
Members of the 1914 Glee Club will appear in old and new
Songs every evening at 8 o’clock in the Pavilion.
General Admission 25c, 50c
—Mme. Schaffer—
Hairdressing
Shampooing
MANICURING AND FACIAL MASSAGE
OVER DODGE’S DEP’T STORE
W. 8th and Olive
Phone 888
Board and Room
For University People
SPLENDID RATES
FORMER TRAINING TABLE HEADQUARTERS
Also fine large house for club of students
Mrs. L. Meacham
Phone 453-Y
215 W 7th.
The OREGANA
*
Welcomes the University Students Old and
New to the Oregana
"The STUDENTS'SHOP"
11th and Alder
Our Methods:
THE METHODS and manner in which the Sample Store operates
their string of 20 stores are identically the same as if it were one
great institution under one roof. Their buying is done in the
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When the decision is made there is no time lost in exchanging
and worry about bad fits, waiting, etc. 60 9Willamette Street.
Eugene Sample Store
We Meet all Mail Order Prices
WELCOME ‘U’
CRESSEY’S BOOK STORE “•XT’”
Loose Leaf Note Books, Any Size
Fountain Pens—Waterman’s, Conklin's and Parker, Self-fillers, $1 and up
Memory Books, Some Very Beautiful Designs, Any Crest or Seal You
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Leather Goods in Pillows, Banners, Runners
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