Oregon emerald. (Eugene, Or.) 1909-1920, June 01, 1915, Image 1

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    OREGON
EMERALD
PUBLISHED THREE TIMES A WEEK
UNIVERSITY OF OREGON, EUGENE, TUESDAY, JUNE 1, 1915
Volume VII, No. 89
POSPONED DUAL MEET
IS DUE SATURDAY—IF?
BARRING RAIN, O. A. C. AND OR-|
EGON WILL FIGHt IT OUT
AT CORVALLIS
COOK AND NELSON 60NE
Track Captain and Quarter Miler's
Absence Will Cost Hayward
10 or 15 Points
The postponed dual meet with 0. A.
C. will be staged Saturday at Corval
lis, despite the facts that the school
year will be over for the Aggies, and
that two of Coach Hayward’s stars
have left school for work.
Captain Sam Cook and Martin Nel
son will not be on hand to represent
the Lemon-Yellow and Bill will lose
about 10 or 15 points thereby. Sam
would be good for five in the shot,
three in the discus, and something,
in the javelin. “Cotton” would have
an easy time in the half and would |
also be a strong contender on the
relay team. Langley may come to
the front in the 880, however.
The meet will probably add a mem
ber or two to the Order of the “0”
and Bill wants the boys to have their
chance. Sprinters, broad jumpers
and 880 men won’t have very severe
competition from “Doc” Stewart’s
spikers.
Another argument for holding the
meet is the financial consideration.
Track has not paid any too well this
year, and Manager Tiffany is anx
ious to add a little to the resources
from this account.
Coach Hayward will take 20 ath
letes with him and is not entirely
discouraged with the outlook, not
withstanding the conditions.
This meet will close the athletic
year for Oregon and may result in
a few more broken records. Loucks
and Kadderly will furnish a copule
of thrillers when they toe the mark
in the quarter and furlong, and Mose
Payiie will have another chance to
hang one on his rival for Pacific
Coast distance honors. Hobgood, Rey
nolds and Huggins will probably put
up a good mile also.
HELEN JOHNS HOLDS FIRE IN
CHECK UNTIL HELP COMES
Promptness on the part of Helen
Johns in calling the fire department,
and in holding a garden hose pointed
at the flames in a room full of smoke
until help arrived, saved the home of
C. J. Steele at 233 Thirteenth Ave
nue from serious damage, at 6:15
Sunday evening.
Miss Johns, with her sister, Mary,
and her mother, were passing the
house, when through a window they
saw a flame flickering. There was
no one at home, so Miss Johns ran
to the house of a neighbor, phoned for
the fire department, and then hurried
back to the Steele house.
[With the help of Aline Johnson,
she climbed into an open window,
dragging a garden hose which they
had found in the yard. She stood in
the smoke-filled room, holding the wa
ter on the flames, and was still
perched on the window sill when the
fire department arrived.
No one had bee nat home all day,
and the only explanation offered for
the cause of the fire is that an electric
light left burning had set fire to a
curtain hanging near. Miss Johns
was not injured. Mr. Steele estimates
the damage at $200.
************
* TAU KAPPA ALPHA *
* ANNOUNCES THE ELECTION *
* OF *
* CLOYD DAWSON *
*****************
The University of Texas has in
stalled a machine for cleaning andj
drying the athletes’ uniforms, partic
ularly the football togs. I
I
COUPLES FOR EMERALD FEED
MATED DT LOTTERY SYSTEM
Promoters of Annual Wassail Meet in
Solemn Conclave and Gambling
Instinct Asserts Itself
The gambling incubus, which seems
to have been bred by the recent All
University Lottery Dance, has even
invaded the unpolluted portals of the
Emerald’s sanctum sanctorum.
Yesterday morning several members
of the staff met in a star chamber
session in the editor’s office in McClure
basement- Their object was to pair
the scribes and scribesses for the an
nual banquet which will be held in the
Osburn tea room Thursday evening.
After great mental anguish, the
matchmakers decided it couldn’t be
done according to system. No agree
ment could be reached concerning what
couples would decorate the festal
board to the best advantage.
Then somebody thought of the lot
tery idea. Slips bearing the girls’
names were quickly written and placed
in a box; the men’s names were placed
in another. Helen Johns and Rita
Fraley did the drawing. Since the
masculine element predominates, there
are a few men who will not have part
ners.
The lottery was on the level, for
besides the two already named, there
were present as witnesses Mrs. Johns,
of Pendleton, George Washington Col
ton, and the editor and manager of
the Emerald.
“I’LL BE THERE" 15 CRY
OF FOOTBALL “VETS”
Captain Anson Cornell Expects All
Members to be On Neck at
Training Camp
Despite the fact that Johnnie Par
sons and Ray Bryant did not remain
in school, Cdptfcin “Anse” expects
every member of last year’s football
team to be on deck when the “roll is
called up yonder” next fall, and Bez
dek begins to cast his eyes about for
his football team. Definite arrange
ments have not been made for the es
tablishment of a training camp, but
it is thought that the men will be
gin to assemble in Eugene about Sep
tember 1.
Some people think that there will
be a change in the way in which some
of the old men will line up, although
the coach has not made any state
ments to that effect. This, however,
will probably be decided when he sees
the new aspirants who register next
fall
Dope on the prospective Freshman
athletes is also lacking, and, judging
from the type of prep school football
put up last year, this outlook is not
very encouraging.
SENIOR COMMENCEMENT
PROGRAMS HAVE ARRIVED
The Senior commencement invita
tions have arrived and may be se
cured by the Seniors at the Y. M.
C. A. book exchange. They are is
sued in one envelope only, on ruff
paper. The script is an even block
form
Policemen in Iowa City are not in
sympathy with an inter-fraternity
baseball series unless the students
can find some other ball grounds than
the city streets. Several students
have been arrested already; one of
them was caught while hiding in the
bath tub at the Phi Delta Theta house,
while some of his fraternity brothers
chose better hiding places and es
caped.
Coach Cananough, of Dartmouth,
characterizes the football situation as
most serious. The spring practice has
not brought out any quarterback cap
able of steering the team, and mate
rial for the ends is also lacking.
RESULTS WILL FOLLOW
SESSIONS, SAYS YOUNG
MEASURES PROMULGATED IN
COMMONWEALTH CONFER
ENCE TO MATERIALIZE
CITY GOVERNMENT TO BENEFIT
Even Studentless Student Meeting
May Bear Fruit in Better Exploit
ation of Natural Resources
“Measures discussed during the sev
enth Commonwealth Conference will
■undoubtedly materialize in the form
of bills that will stand a good chance
of passing in the next session of the
legislature," said Professor F. G.
Young, head of the Department of
Economics and promoter of the Com
monwealth idea, in speaking of the re
sults achieved at last week’s ses
sion.
“The discussions Thursday on mu
nicipal charters and city government
will at least bring about a united ef
fort on the part of representatives
to the Conference in securing a more
compact system of city government.
Auditing systems were discussed at
length Thursday and a good many
practical plans advanced.’’
Rufus C- Holman, Commissioner of
Multnomah County, read a paper deal
ing with the attainment of efficient ad
ministration in county affairs. A
copy of this paper will soon be print
ed and sent to every county in Ore
gon. Mr. Holman said:
“Publicity is one of the best meth
ods of securing the best service from
public officials. Publicity safeguards
the public from the evils resultant
from a secret county administration.”
In speaking of Friday’s session,
Professor Young said:
“Although only a few Oregon stu
dents were present at the students’
Commonwealth Friday afternoon, I
believe some definite action will re
sult from what took place at that time.
It is necessary to get tourists out in
the forests, if they are to appreciate
the value of them, and we cannot do
this without some definite plan as to
securing data, advertising and so on.
All the resources of Oregon would be
indirectly benefited if it were possi
ble to get more people to visit the
state.”
F. B. Riley spoke Friday afternoon
before the students, emphasizing the
wonders of Oregon’s scenery.
“Crater Lake is truly a gratifying
sight. This lake will probably be
visited this summer by the Mazamas
as a side trip from their regular ex
pedition to Mt- Shasta.
“The Josephine marble caves, near
Grants Pass, have even the caves of
Kentucky equalled in beauty. No one
can visit these marble halls of Ore
gon without being inspired with a
love of beauty and nature.”
“The commercial clubs,” said Pro
fessor Young, “wil ltake a greater in
terest in co-operation I am sure after
this Commonwealth. It was definitely
pointed out that the entire state should
co-operate to bring in settlers, who
would take up farming. The farm
ing population strengthened, better
markets could be secured for the pro
duce. At present the market problem
is a constant set-back to the farmer
of Oregon.”
PHYSICS STUDENTS WRITE
ON SUBJECTS OF INTEREST
Many students enrolled in the class
of Physics 4 have written papers late
ly on subjects suggested to them by
their instructor, Dr. Caswell. Contri
butions on Light, Subatomic Theory
of Matter, the Harmful Effects of
Ultra-Violet Light, and others of
equal interest, have been reecived to
date. The work is not compulsory,
but credit is given for essays of par
ticular merit.
WEDNESDAY ASSEMBLY
TO INSTALL OFFICERS
TWO NEW AMENDMENTS TO THE
CONSTITUTION WILL BE
INTRODUCED
VARSITY BAND TO BE ON HAND
Men’s and Women's Glee Clubs Will
Also Furnish Entertainment
Claron
Installation of the incoming1 Stu
| dent Body officers, music by both Glee
; Clubs and the Varsity Band, the intro
| duction of two new amendments to the
Constitution, and several speeches are
' some of the events scheduled for the
last Student Body meeting, which will
be held tomorrow at 10:00 o’clock in
j Villard Hall.
Ceremonies attendant upon installa
j tion will be conducted by Tom Boylen,
President of the Student Body, after
which the meeting will be in charge
of Lamar Tooze, the new President,
who has prepared a program for the
occasion.
Ben Dorris, on behalf of the Sen
iors, Cloyd Dawson, of the Y- M. C.
A., and Coach Hugo Bezdek, ar* slat
ed for talks.
A plea which will probably be em
bodied in one of the speeches, at least,
is that more strenuous work be done
during the coming summer to inter
est high school students throughout
the state in the University.
One of the amendments which will
be introduced at the meeting is that
of making class taxes payable to the
Registrar at the beginning of the col
lege year; the other makes the Presi
dent of the Student Body an ex-officio
member of the Athletic Council. The
by-laws must first be suspended by
a two-thirds vote before these amend
ments can be introduced, as the meet
ing tomorrow is not a regular Stu
dent Body meeting.
The incoming and outgoing Student
Body officers are as follows, the new
members appearing first: President,
Lamar Tooze, Tom Boylen; Vice-Pres
ident, Harry Kuck, Bert Lombard;
Secretary, Eva Brock, Ruth Dorris;
Executive Council, Fred Dunbar and
Wallace Eakin, Bert Jerard and Sam
Michael; Student Council, Don Or
put, Cleveland Simpkins, Bothwell
Avison, Arvilla Beckwith, Genevieve
Shaver, Louise Bailey, Fred Kiddle,
Karl Becke and Echo Zahl; _ Elton
Loucks, James Donald, Marsh Good
win, Gertrude Buell, Beulah Stebno,
| Lyle Steiwer, Leslie Tooze, Robert
i Bean and Louise Bailey; Editor of
the Emerald, Max Sommer, Leland
! Hendricks; Manager, Floyd Wester
: field, Anthony Jaureguy; Athletic
Council, Lyle Bigbee Sam Cook and
Anson Cornell, Ray Bryant, John
Parsons and Henry Heidenreich.
Plans for next year will be out
lined at a meeting of the new Stu
dent Council to be held Wednesday
evening.
TWO STUDENTS MAKE GOOD
TIME TO CORVALLIS IN CANOE
Frank Beach and George Colton,
two University Sophomores, have just
returned from a canoe trip to% Cor
Ivallis to witness the conference meet,
j The two students left at 6:30 A- M.
Friday morning, and reached Corval
lis at 2:15 P. M.
“The excitement began,” says
Frank Beach, “as soon as we left Eu
gene, when we tried to run the rapids
just above the Coburg bridge. The
waves were so high the boat was al
most filled with water and it was
with difficulty paddled ashore to emp
ty the canoe.”
As near as they can ascertain, the
boys established a new record for
this trip.
Harvard’s new library, the Widener
library, will have a capacity of 1,800,
000 volumes.
FROSH IN FRENCH CLASS
FINDS TIME FOR CREAMS
Nightmare is Result of Attempt to!
While Time Away With Timmy
Cloran
The following dream of a Frosh
who fell asleep in French class is put
on record by DeWitt Gilbert:
I have seen a mud shark painting
with his golden tail the dawn,
I have seen the periwinkles with their
gleaming sabers drawn,
Charge the trenches, mad with fury,
in a crimson cycle-car,
As we ordered seething cocktails at
an' Albuquerque bar.
I have watched the kitchen sink, I
have seen the peanut man
Picking dress suits from the palm
trees with the Priest of Ketchikan,
I have watched the Igorotes drinking
soup made of a plank,
And they said “God speed the ves
sels Did you know the knot holes
shrank?”
But at last I saw the maelstrom set
1 ting all the world awhirl,
And I wraved “Auf Weldersehn” to
another fellow’s girl
Who was playing with a truck-horse
on a jolly trolley wire,
Singing “Where the smoke is, there
will also be the fire.”
Then I found my trousers missing,
j and I wandered quite a while,
i Looking for a light-weight fighter
who would loan to me a file,
To help fix a broken ocean that was
lying with its door
I Spelling weinerwurst and sauer kraut
in a sort of whispered roar.
’ll PICKS J1 FOSTER
U. OF G. AS SECRETARY
New Man Will Report About August
1; Has Been at Cal
ifornia
J. Douglas Foster, University of
California 1914, will succeed Charles
Koyl as General Secretary of the Uni
versity Y. M. C. A. He will report
here at the close of summer school at
Black Mountain, Carolina, about July
22
Foster is 24 years of age and has
been the man behind the Christian
work in the University of California
the past year. He has also been stu
dent pastor of the Congregational
church in Berkeley during the same
time. Mr. Foster is a member of I’hi
Psi and Acacia.
MONEY SCARCE FOR MOVING
ATHLETIC FIELD, SAY REGENTS
The Board of Regents will be com
pelled to sacrifice a portion of the
annual budget if the athletic field
is moved this summer. At the Re
gents’ meeting in April $5,000 was
appropriated for the moving of the
athletic field from its present location
on Kincaid street to the ground east
of the graveyard Bids were called
for, but up to the present time, no
bid less than $10,000 has been turned
in at the executive offices. Definite
action will be taken on this matter
at the next meeting of the Board
of Regents Tuesday, June 15, during
commencement week.
The income for the University this
year will be approximately $270,000,
not enough to allow the construction
of new buildings according bo the
list of expenditures listed in the
present budget.
Rufus C. Holman, the Regent who
disputed Governor Withycombe’s ac
tion in releasing him and appointing
a new Regent, will attend the meet-1
ing of the Board. He was notified by'
the Secretary of the Board meeting
June 15.
Mrs. A. J- Baker and Eugene Baker
were dinner guests at the Gamma Phi
Beta house Thursday night.
STUDENTS III Ml
OF COMPULSORY TAX
NINE OUT OF TEN EXPRESS
THEMSELVES AS FAVOR
ABLE TO CHANGE
MICHAEL OPPOSES MEASURE
Suggests Withholding of Credits Un
til Class Tax Has Been
Paid
Out of ten students interviewed, all
jut one expressed themselves as fa
vorable to the proposed amendment
:o the Student Body Constitution re
quiring that the class taxes be col
lected by the Registrar at the begin
ning of the school year
Sam Michael opposed the amend
ment, saying that the general business
office of the University should not be
bothered with class affairs. “Besides,”
he said, “it will make the new students
who are not acquainted with the class
tax amendment feel that they are pay
ing $19 or $20 for registration, accor
ding as the class levy is one or two
dollars. Another objection is that
some will register as special students
in order to avoid the payment of class
dues, as there is no provision in the
proposed amendment in regard to spe
cials. A better plan as adopted by
other schools would be the withhold
ing of credits until the class tax has
been paid. I admit that there should
be a better system of collecting class
dues, but I am not in favor of the
method as proposed in this amend
ment.”
President-elect Tooze said that the
amendment is a fine thing. “From an
administrative standpoint there is no
question about its advisability. First,
there is the ease of collection; no one
can avoid the tax. The money will
be on hand at the first of the year,
the bills can be regularly met and ad ■
vantage taken of all discounts. Then
there will be a complete permanent
record of the class finances. As it i3
now practically none of the treasur
ers’ books are saved; and lastly the
poor student will not be the only one
who comes through as is very often
the case under the present system.”
The foremost argument in favor of
this amendment, said President Boy
len, is that those who pay now are
those who can least afford to. “Only
sixty per cent of the students pay
these legitimate class dues under the
method of collecting now in vogue,
and these three-fifths bear the burden
of all class expenses. Through the ad
ministrative offices the class accounts
will be kept by experts in a scientific
fashion, and none will graduate with
promissory notes hanging over them.
At the present time the man best fit
ted for the job will often not accept
the position of class treasurer because
it is a begging occupation.
“Another potent factor to consider
is the Oregana problem. Inasmuch
as the year-book is the University’s
best advertising medium, it should be
the very best possible publication.
Many feel that the last issue of the
Oregana was not up to the standard
set by last year’s publication and that
it is not doing justice to the Univer
sity. If this amendment is adopted,
there will be plenty of money in any
Junior treasury to put out a fine Ore
gana, and enough money left over for
a Senior memorial.”
James Donald: “Every argument
favors the passage of the amendment.
It insures scientific book-keeping of
the class accounts; it insures funds in
the treasury; it reaches all the mem
bers of the class. At the same time it
leed not inflict a hardship, as the pay
ment of the tax is not compulsory;
'he only privilege that delinquent
nembers are deprived of is the right
:o vote for class officers.”
Roy Stephens: “The proposed
amendment is a great thing. Nearly
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