Oregon emerald. (Eugene, Or.) 1909-1920, May 01, 1915, Image 1

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    OREGON
#
EMERALD
PUBLISHED THREE TIMES A WEEK
UNIVERSITY OF OREGON, EUGENE, SATURDAY, MAY 1, 1915
Volume XVII, No. 74
1
’V.
HAYWARD’S GREYHOUNDS BEAT CLUBMEN 93-32
OREGON’S FEINGERS LOSE TWICE TO 0. A. C.
TUEBCK AND WELCH ARE SOLVED
WITH EASE BY AGGIE SWATTERS
OREGON RETAINS SHAKY LEAD UNTIL OTH INNING OF
YESTERDAY’S GAME—SKEET BIBBEE'S ABSENCE TAKES
BACKBONE OUT UF INFIELD ANU MUFFS ARE MANY
By Harry Kuck.
Yesterday’s Game
Corvallis, Or., May 1—(Special to
the Emerald)—Final score this after
noon: 0. A. C. 20, Oregon 5.
Batteries: Welch and Lieuallen;
Phelps and Weller.
O. A. C. took the first game of the
series, 7 to 3, by bunching four clean
hits with two Oregon errors in the
eighth inning. The game, which was
slow and full of errors, was played
before a small crowd, and in the ab
sence of Old Sol.
The Aggies hit Tuerck at will and
threatened to score in nearly every
inning. The “Kaiser” was wild and
ineffective; fast fielding behind him
* in the pinches, and poor base run
ning by 0. A. C., saved him twice
earlier in the game.
O. A. C. opened the eighth with the
score 3 to 2 against them, and the
first man up flew out to Grebe. Loof
knocked a puny grounder to Tuerck,
who, with worlds of time, threw high
and wide and handsome, to first,
giving the outfielder life. Weller
cracked out his second three-bagger
into deep center, scoring Loof. Sie
berts grounded to Tuerck, who tried
for Weller, both hands being safe.
Fryer flew to pitcher, making two
down, but Morgan, Goble and Wil
liams hit in a row, and three more
scores filtered across. “Buck” Bigbee
mussed up a grounder and Goble
scored the fifth run of the inning.
hi Smith ended the agony by grounding
out to Grebe.
The Varsity got but five hits off
“Bicky” Williams, scattered through
as many innings. Four errors are
charged against the big twirler, two
of which counted in the Lemon Yelr
low scores.
Oregon scored the first run of the
game in the second inning. Nelson
flew out to center field. M. Bigbee
drew a pass and advanced a notch on
a passed ball. Wilhelm’s effort wps
a pop fly. Lieuallen walked and
Grebe scored “Buck” with a single
between first and second.
Bezdek’s crew registered a run each
in the fourth and sixth cantos, and
. managed to keep the lead until the
fatal eighth. The team fielded er
ratically, however, erring eight times.
A single, triple and home run net
ted the home team but one run in tht
fifth. Seely singled sharply through
the box, Grebe made a nice stop, but
heaved wildly to first, and Seely can
tered to second. Smith flew out, but
Loof tripled between left and cen
ter. Umpire Richardson ruled him
out for receiving assistance from the
coacher. Weller knocked a real home
run far over Sheehy’s head, but neg
lected to touch third base. Coach
Bezdek was on the job and the ball
was returned to the difficult corner,
whereupon the “umps” again cast
gloom into Aggie ranks by waving
the runner out.
Four runs to the bad, the coach
sent in a squad of pinch hitters in
the ninth, but they failed to phase
Williams, who finished strong.
The summary follows:
Oregon— AB R H PO A E
Cornell, 3d .,.... 4 0 1 0 0 2
Sheehy, cf . 3 0 2 0 0 0
L. Bigbee, rf . 4 0 0 2 2 0
Nelson, lb . 4 0 0 2 1 0
M. Bigbee, 2b .. 2 2 1 2 0 1
Wilhelm, If . 110 10 1
Lieuallen, c . 2 0 0 8 0 1
Grebe, ss. 3 0 15 12
Tuerck, p . 3 0 0 2 0 1
Huntington. 0 0 0 0 0 0
C. Bigbee .*. 0 0 0 0 0 0
Gorman . 1 0 0 0 0 0
27 3 5 22 4 8
O. A. C.— AB R H PO A E
Seely, If . 5 2 2 0 0 0
Smith, 2b . 5 0 0 4 0 2
Loof, cf . 3 12 10 0
Weller, c . 3 12 8 12
Sieberts, 3b . 3 1 0 2 0 0
Fryer, rf . 4 0 0 1 0 0
Morgan, ss .* 4 1113 0
Goble, lb . 3 119-00
Williams, p . 3 0 115 0
33 7 9 27 9 4
Score by innings—
O. A. C.—
123456789RHE
O. A. C.0 0101005 79 4
123456789RHE
Oregon.0 10101000358
WILLIAM HOLT TO PUBLISH
BOOK FOR FUTURE MANAGERS
Mr. William Holt, manager of the
1916 Oregana, will publish a book for
the use of future Oregana managers
shortly after the present edition is
published and distributed.
Mr. Holt plans to put all the infor
mation necessary into the book in let
ter form. The heads of the different
departments of this year’s book will
also tell just what they have done.
This will enable the future mana
gers and those in charge of the differ
ent departments to profit by the ex
perience of others.
Coach Nicklas, of Yale, forbids his
♦ oarsmen to chew gum, claiming that
the habit is injurious to the athlete.
HOUSE GRADES WILL HE
PUBLISHED NEXT FALL
A list of the fraternity house
grades for the present semester will
be published in one of the early fall
numbers of the Emerald of the com
ing school year, announced Registrar
Tiffany yesterday. The records will
not be obtainable for publication this
spring.
The potato bulletin, issued last
month by the University School of
Commerce has been sent thus far to
2,250 persons. There has been great
demand for it among commercial clubs
and banks, for growers in their sec
tions. Copies were sent to all
the national banks in Oregon.
MILL RACE TO RIVAL STREET
IN VENICE JUNIOR WEEK-END
Water Fete Will Be Held Thursday
Night—No Fake This Time,
Says Orput
A water fete at last!
Various classes have advertised
this feature among their Junior
Week-End attractions, but always t
has fallen through. Old timers re
icall that in 1911 Ralph Moores pro
moted a canoe carnival. A queen of
the carnival was elected after the ex
the admirers of tn» various college
penditure of much lucre for votes by
belles. As usual, the rain descended
and the torrents fell. There was no
carnival, and said swains are still
wondering what became of their hard
earned.
Then, in 1913, Art Geary scheduled
an alleged water fete. It consisted
of a few swimming races between am
bitous preppers.
“We are gong to have a real fete
this year, rain or shine,” declared
Don Orput, chairman of the commit
tee, today. “It will be held on the
mill-race in the vicinity of the boat
house, at four o’clock Thursday ev
ening of Junior Week-End. This will
enable visitors who arrive during that
day to see the show.
“Every fraternity will have a dec
orated canoe, symbolic of some local
event. Then there will be a unique
arrangement for music. The commit
tee would like to receive suggestions
for other features.
“There will be no swimming or ca
noe races,” concluded the elastic czar
of the rooters. “This is an aesthetic
and not an athletic event”
NAMES OF 20 ENTRIES
FROM 7 SCHOOLS SENT
Track Is Being Put Into Shape, and
Prizes are Provided for
Winning “Preppers”
The first batch of entries for the
interscholastic track meet, which is
to be held on the campus, Saturday,
May 15, were received Friday morn
ing by Graduate Manager Tiffany.
The high schools from which blanks
were received, and the number of
men entered from each are as fol
lows: Gold Hill, 2; Medford, 5;
Grants Pass, 5; Hood River, 2; Day
ton, 4; Amity, 1; and Merrill, 1.
The track is being put in shape,
and all other details are being at
tended to, according to Mr. Tiffany,
who states that “we’ll have quite a
meet here some of these days.” Mr.
Tiffany expects a lot more entries
during the next two or three days,
for high schools pretty generally
throughout the state are expected to
take part in the meet this year.
The winners of first places in the
entire thirteen events will receive a
gold medal, the winners of second
place, a silver medal, and of third
place, a bronze medal. The victorious
relay team will receive a silver cup,
and the school winning the greatest
number of points will receive another
cup.
Last year the honors of the inter
srholastic meet went to three -Port
land schools, the nearest competitor
(Continood
4.)
NOCTURNAL GORMANDS ROUSE
COPS BY FAKE BOMBILMS
City Police Garrison Responds to Ri
ot Call When Local “Doc Yak”
Kids the Cook
As a result of a college prank, a
game of checkers was broken up, a
hotel aroused and a riot call sent into
the city station last night, when two
studes undertook to answer the tele
phone in a local restaurant. It was
nearly midnight when Wilmot Foster
and Doc Sutton were seized with a
sudden longing for some waffles.
While waiting for them to brown
they entertained the cook with a few
hymns of this year’s vintage. The
phone rang furiously and Frosh Sut
ton promptly answered it. It was the
owner of the hotel on the next floor,
who insisted that the noise be stopped.
The Frosh tremblingly confided to her
that there were 40 or 50 students
fighting and tearing up the furni
ture, and that he was afraid for his
life. Would she mind calling the po
lice? Not at all! Promptly the red
light at Pearl and Ninth streets went
on and cops scurried to the scene of
the Icarnage, one even sacrificing a
game of checkers at the Griggs Hotel
to race to Ninth. The studes, it seems,
had ducked.
- m ^ m -
University of Indiana: Because
the members of an orchestra smoked
cigarettes between dances, thereby
breaking University rules, the Indiana
Union refused to pay the orchestra
for its services at the last union
dance. As a result, the musicians have
filed suit in Justice Bailey’s court
against the Union for $16, the amount
they claim is due them.
MANY RELICS OF OLD
VICTORIES REST IN GYM
Illustrious Names of Bygone Days
Engraved Upon Tarnished Cups; In
scriptions Date Back 20 Years
In the trophy cases and on the walls
of the gymnasium rest today relics
and records of Oregon’s bygone tri
umphs. On the cups, tarnished and
dusty, one may read inscriptions cut
there twenty years ago, when Oregon
won the “intercollegiate champion
ship.”
On some are engraved names which
were world famous, as Kelly and Hus
ton. There is a trophy for nearly
every year, and in and out among
the sixteen cups lie footballs, relics
of games won. They date from 1906,
when Oregon played and beat town
teams as well as colleges.
In various degrees of fadedness,
ten purple banners, the prizes from
as many Columbia meets, hang on the
walls of the second floor.
There also are large boards on
which campus track records were for
merly printed. For some unknown
reason, this custom has been neglect
ed, but some of the old inscriptions
retain their interest.
The Council of Deans at the Univer
sity of Oklahoma will give Btudent
government a supreme test during
the rest of the semester. The fac
ulty has decided to keep out of any
questions pertaining to gambling and
let the students suppress the nuisance
themselves.
(HOSE PAYNE JOURNEYS TWO MILES
IN ^CUTTING NORTHWEST THE
LOUCKS STEPS QUARTER IN SO FLAT-NELSON NEGOTIATES
HALF IN 1:58—WIN6EC M ATHLETES PLAGE RUT
SELDOM—MOIRHEAD IS HI6H POINT-WINNER
Oregon hogged the dual track meet
with Multnomah Amateur Athletic
Ciub in Eugene today, scoring Oil
points to the clubmen’s 32.
Although the day was cold and not
conducive to fast time, Mose Payne,
without great effort, ran the two mile
in 9:40 4-5, and that practically
against time, there being no Multno
man immediately after the race. This
can do it in 9:37,” said the little brown
man immediately afterthe race. This
beats the Northwest record, held by
McClelland at 9:50, by 1-6 of a min
ute. The former record, however,
stands.
Multnomah was allowed but two
firsts, won by Bellah in the pole vault,
at 11 ft. 6 in., and by Philbrook in the
discus at 123 ft. 4 in.
Loucks ran the quarter in 50 flat,
the best time he has ever made on
the Oregon tra;ck. Also Nelson “came
back,” after an off-season, tearing off
the half in 1:58 2-5—within two sec
onds of the Northwest record set by
himself last spring.
Muirhead also made the high hur
dles in 15 3-6 seconds, which is excep
tional time considering conditions all
around.
In general, Multnomah did not have
a look in, and in none of the running
events were the Oregon boys crowd
ed.
One race which was expected to
be hotly contested, namely the mile,
between Huggins, of Oregon, McClure,
of Multnomah, and Belding, for Ore
gon, was an easy victory for Huggins,
who traveled the four laps in 4:26 2-6.
The following is a summary of the
meet:
440-yd. Run—Loucks (U. of O)
first; Bull (U. of O) second; Wilson
(U. of O.) third. Time 50 seconds.
16-pound Shot—Cook (U. of 0.)
first, 42 ft. 6 in.; Philbrook (M. A. A.
C.) second, 40 ft. 9 in.; Fee (U. of 0.)
third, 38 ft. 3 in.
100-yd. Dash—Boylen (U. of 0.)
first; Westerfield (U. of O.) second;
Hummel (M. A. A. C.) third. Time
10 2-5.
Mile Run—Huggins (U. of O.) first;
McClure (M. A. A. C.) second; Beld
ing (U. of O.) third. Time 4:26 2-5.
Two Mile Run—Payne (U. of 0.)
first; Bostwick (U. of 0.) second.
Time 9:40 4-6.
High Hurdles—Muirhead (U. of 0.)
first; Fee (U. of O.) second; Hummel
(M. A. A. C.) third. Time 16 3-5 sec
onds.
Discus—Philbrook <Mv A.! A. C.)
first, 123 ft. 4 in.; Heidenreich, (U.
of O.) second, 121 ft. 8 in.; Cook (U.
of 0.) third, 120 ft. 10 in.
220-yd. Dash—Loucks (U of 0.)
first; Boylen (U. of O.) second; Go
reczsky (U. of O.) third. Time, 23
seconds.
Pole Vault—Bellah (M. A. A. C.)
first, 11 ft. 6 in.; Fee and Magone tied
for second and third at 11 feet.
Half-Mile Run—Nelson (U. of O.)
first; Langley (U. of 0.) second;
Demmon (M. A. A. C.) third. Time
1:58- 2-5.
High Jump—Muirhead, (U. of O.)
first, 6 ft. 10 in.; Magone (M. A. A.
C.) second, 5 ft. 8 in.; Clark (U. of
O.) third, 6 ft. 6 in.
220-Low Hurdles—Muirhead (U. of
0.) first; Hummel (M. A. A. C.) sec
ond; Ford (U. of O.) third. Time
23 seconds.
Javelin—Fee (U. of 0.) first, 153
ft. 3 1-2 in.; Bellah (M. A. A. C.) sec
ond, 161 ft. 6 in.; Hummel (M. A. A.
C.) 151 ft. 5 in.
Broad Jump—Muirhead (U. of 0.)
first, 21 ft. 6 in.; Fee (U. of O.) sec
ond, 20 ft. 8 in.; Hummel (M. A. A.
C.) third, 20 ft. 5 1-2 in.
FflESHNEN PUN COMEDY
Yearlings Promise Novelty in the
Risque Musical Line at An
nual Class Hour
“This Way Out,” which is described
as being a novelty in the way of
risque musical comedy and spicy hu
mor, is the mysterious title of the
show being prepared for their class
hour by the Freshmen under the
guidance of Don Newbury, DeWitt
Gilbert and Doc Sutton.
There will be a large orchestra of
Frosh, to pound out some whistlea
ble tunes; there will be a sprinkling
of burlesque, some of the latest
wriggles in dancing, a smack of “ten,
twenty and thirty” melodrama; and
some good singing to balance up the
bill. The program from the first over
ture to the last ensemble is entirely
original and distinctly different from
any of the previous class hours.
OREGANAS OUT MAY 8
Manager Holt Says Receipts Will
Just Cover Cost—750 Copies
Printed
"The Oreganas will undoubtedly be
here May 8,’’ said WHIiam Holt, man
ager of the 1916 Oregana.
“AH but 80 of the 350 pages have
been printed, while the binding is all
done with the exception of the stamp
ing. The duo-tones have come and
they are certainly fine cuts.
“We will just about break even this
year,” declared Holt. “The sales on
the campus, as well as the sales in
Portland, have been much better than
last year. Another way that we have
cut down expense is by ordering
only 750 copies, instead of the 1,000
ordered last year, of which 300 are
still unsold.”
AU other information, he said, has
been published a dozen times.