Oregon emerald. (Eugene, Or.) 1909-1920, March 17, 1914, Image 4

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    KODAK
Developing, Printing, Enlarging,
Copying and Ivin tern Slide*.
PAGE STUDIO
H. B. REYNOLDS, Pro*.
MARX
BARBER
SHOP
t
W. A. Kuykendall
DRUGS
The Rexall Store
t
THE WATER PROBLEM
SOLVED AT LAST
Install a Pump and
DRIVE IT WITH
ELECTRICITY
Oregon Power Co.
COLLEGE ICE CREAM
AND PUNCHES
• • • « ’ *
o ° —Q — -
o 0 O
For Particular People
o
Eugene Ice &
Sorage Co.
PHONE 343
OHIO TO ADD M
JOURNALISM
LARGE EASTERN UNIVERSI
TY PLANS FOR NEW
DEPARTMENT
HARRINGTON NAMED DEAN
Well-Known Newspaper Man
and Writer Who Has Been
Professor in the English De
partment to Take Charge.
Announcement is made by Presi
dent Thwing of Western Reserve
University of the appointment of
Harry F. Harrington, of the depart
ment of English, of Ohio State Uni
versity, as dean for the School of
Journalism which will be opened in
the university in September. Mr.
Harrington did his undergraduate
work In Ohio State University, gradu
ating in 1905 and was special univer
sity scholar in English in Columbia
University, from which he received
the decree of Master of Arts, in 1909.
He has had reportorial, editorial and
other journalistic experience, and
has been a college teacher in Ohio
Wesleyan University and in Ohio
State University. He began the
teaching of journalism in Ohio Wes
leyan University. From an advanced
English class of nineteen membars in
Ohio State University, he organized
courses in journalism, now number
ing 115 students. He is the author
of “Essentials in Journalism,” a text
book now used in the School of Jour
nalism in Columbia University. His
newspaper experience has been on
town and city newspapers, and on
university and other magazines. He
was editor of the London Ohio Times,
and was on the staff of the Ohio
State Journal. He is a member of
the Buckeye Press Association, Ohio
College Press Association, Columbus
Press Club, Ohio Club, and other or
ganizations.
To Open in September.
The School of Journalism will be
opened in September, 1914. The pur
pose of the school will be to give pro
fessional education to those propos
ing to become journalists. The
school will be a graduate school and
the courses will cover one year, at
the conclusion of which a degree will
he given Mr. Dan R. Hanna, of
Cleveland, has offered $10,000 a year
toward the support of the depart
ment. This annual fund will sup
plement the tuition fees of $125 a
student.
| I ho school will be housed In a
special suite of rooms which will be
fitted up for the purpose on the first
floor of Adelbort Hall. These rooms
will Include editorial offices, a read
ing room where all newspapers of
Importance will he on file, a local
room fitted out with typewriters,
telephones and other equipment, and
with an experienced newspaper man
in charge as the "city editor.” He
will send out students in news col
lecting to “cover" actual stories
throughout the city and will be as
exacting as the man on the "desk”
in the office of the city daily paper.
Stories, when submitted, will be
criticised and lectures will be given
on the practical work of collecting
and writing news. Emphasis will be
placed upon thoroughness and actual
practice. The school will receive the
co-operation of the Cleveland news
papers. The mechanics of the news
paper will be demonstrated by taking
students to newspaper plants where
they will study the operation of lino
types, presses, electrotypes, prints
and other mechanical details, where
they will study circulation and other
newspaper problems.
Other Courses Included.
In addition to the reportorial
course', courses will be given on the
history, of the development of the
editorial, with a discussion of great
newspapers ayd master . journalists
in England and America. A course
yvill be given on the history of the
American newspaper, and other
courses on advertising, the history
and making of the cartoon, newspa
per jurisprudence, the country news
paper, the problems of the mechani
cal make-up. equipment, paper, cost
systems, composition, "patent In
sides.' circulation and editorial con
trol. An effort will be made to train
men for service on both city and
country journals. Much emphasis
STUDENT COUNCIL WILL
PLAN JUNIOR WEEK-END
First Meeting of Newly Created
Body Will Be Held Sat
urday.
The first meeting of the new stu
dent council will be held next Satur
day morning at which time plans for
Junior Week-end will be made.
This council will work with the
Graduate-manager and the heads of
the committees of the Junior class
which have the week-end in charge
and will formulate plans and make
arrangements for the entertainment
of the several hundred high school
athletes who will be here as guests
of the University at that time.
A number of new ideas have been
suggested this year for a more satis
factory handling of such a large dele
gation and these will probably be
taken up this time and something
definite will be done.
This council now consists of 12
students, eight of whom were elect
ed recently by the student body, and
eight others who hold their positions
as heads of prominent student-body
activities. The members now are:
V. T. Motschenhacher, chairman;
Norma Dobie, secretary; Henry Fow
ler, Eleanor McClaine, Wallace Cau
field, Delbert Stanard, Alfred Davies,
Edith Still, Hazel Rader, Fred Har
desty, Tommy Boylen and Beulah
Stebno.
VOLUNTEER MOVEMENT
SECRETARY VISITS HERE
C. 6. HounsheU Speaks at Y. M.
Y .W. Meetings About
Work
C. G. Hounshell, traveling secre
tary of the Student Volunteer Move
ment of the World, arrived Monday
and spent that day on the campus
visiting the students and speaking at
a joint meeting of the Y. M. C. A.
and Y. W. C. A. at four o’clock in
the Y. W. Bungalow. He left Mon
day evening for the University of
California where he will make a
short stay and while in California
will visit most of the colleges in that
state. The University concludes a
visit he has made of all the colleges
and universities of the Willamette
Valley. From California he will go
eastward stopping at the Pacific
Grove Student Conference to be held
March 28 to April 5.
Speaking about his work, Mr.
Hounshell said, “The Kansas City
convention recently .closed was the
rallying of the forces of the Student
Volunteer Movement in North Amer
ica. Seven hundred and fifty-five
of the larger institutions of the con
tinent were represented. It was the
largest student conference ever held
In the world.
I have calls from the various
fields for 700 college graduates. It
is hoped that some of these positions
will be filled. You have a student
volunteer band here, ‘The New Era
In Asia,’ written by Sherwood Eddy,
who has spent years in Asia and is a
leading student of the world, is dis
cussed in the meetings of the volun
teer band now.”
The men of the Dormitory enter
tained Sunday at dinner the follow
ing guests: Miss Nellie Newland,
Miss Mary Baker. Miss Vera Moffat,
Miss Perris Drill, Miss Carry Koyle!
Miss Beulah Stebuo, Miss Edna Hol
man. Miss Cal la Beck, Miss Lucile
Fenton, Miss Echo Zahl, Miss Marie
Allen. Miss Hays, Miss Sparkman
and Mrs. \V. K. Livingston.
As a result of the "clean up”
movement started by "The Daily
lllini,” 700 students of the Univers
ity of Illinois wielded shovels, picks,
hoes, etc., cleaning the streets of
Champaign and Urbana of slush and
mud.
will be placed upon training news
paper men for filling a large place in
towns where they may wield power
and influence.
The dean will have the assistance
of an .instructor who will handle the
introductory courses in news collect
ing and w citing, and of special men
for special courses. Cleveland news
paper men and others from a dist
ance will lecture before the students
of the school. Iu accepting the ap
pointment as dean of the new de
partment, Professor Harrington de
clared Cleveland to be unexcelled as
a working field for the training
which the new department uiav be
expected to give.
HANDBALL GAMES
ARE ONE SIDED
LAST YEAR'S CHAMPION
BEAT ALPHA TAU
OMEGA
FINALS WILL BE CLOSE
Sigma Chi Defeats Dorm dub;
Kappa Sigma vs. Delta Tau
Delta, Phi Gamma Delta vs.
Sigma Nu Today.
The doughnut handball tourna
ment started in full swing Monday
afternoon, when four of the matches
were played.
All the games were extremely one
sided, but a few of the handball en
thusiasts look with anxious calcula
tions to the semi-finals, Thursday,
March 19. With Early and Watson,
representing the Sigma Chi fratern
ity, receiving a*place in the semi-fin
als, by defeating Hardesty and Ar
thur Runquist of the Dorm, two
straight games with scores of 21 to 3
and 21 to 4r; and with Casebeer and
Kuck, the Oregon Club representa
tives and present holders of the Hay
ward cup, receiving a place in the
semi-finals by beating Pobst and
Sweek, representatives of the Alpha
Tau Omega fraternity, two games,
with scores of 21 to 0 and 21 to 8,
the semi-finals promise to present
some of the most interesting games
ever staged on the local court.
The schedule for Tuesday is as fol
lows:
Kappa Sigma vs. Delta Tau Delta.
Phi Gamma Delta vs. Sigma Nu.
DR. STUART RECIPIENT
OF A LOAF OF BREAD
Pure Food Offering Oomes
Through Mail to Physi
cal Director.
Dr. Bertha Stuart received
through the mail yesterday morning
a rather unusual communication in
the form of a miniature loaf of
French bread. That it was sent from
some one in this city is evident from
the 1-cent postage stamp perched
upon a fragment of the hardened
crust.
Upon the side opposite the ad
dress was written, “Pure Food for
Girls,” and in another place, “Sub
mitted for Analysis.”
Prof. Sweetser denies that he has
had anything to do with the send
ing of it.
nnooconnnnnonnoo n r\
o o
o FOLLY o
o o
o WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY o
o — o
o THE LADY IN THE BLACK o
o MASK o
o See her. Hear her. o
o — o
o King Baggott in o
o “THE TOUCH OF A CHILD” o
o Fine Drama. o
o — o
o "UNIVERSAL IKE’S WOOING”
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
I o
!o
Formerly Alkali Ike.
"ANIMATED WEEKLY’
Warren Kerrigan in
"HEARTS AND FLOWERS”
The late blizzard is shown In
the Weekly.
Admission, afternoon and
night. Adults 10c, Children 5c
ooooooooooooooooooo
Buy Peter Pan confections at the
Rex candy store.
looooooooooooooooooo
o o<
o FOR SALE—Pure blackberry o
o juice for punch. If inter- o
o ested leave note for C. L. o
o Stoddard on Villard board. o
° o
ooooooooooooooooooo
Help win a trip to the Exposition
at San Francisco by visiting the Pet
er Pan.
Peter Pan chocolates are the best.
WEUJ&
A Texas university has a secret so
ciety composed entirely, of preachers’
sons. An educational institution of
Indiana boasts of a fraternal society
composed of red-headed men. A col
lege in New Jersey has an organiza
tion devoted to the amelioration of
the life and condition of the fat man
of the college. Now if some geniud
would only come along and organize
a national fraternity of red-headed
fat men who are sons of preachers,!
the cause of righteousness, liberty
and the like ought to receive a big
boost.
SPRING MILLINERY DISPLAY
Friday and Saturday, March 20th-21st
Chic Hats for College Girls
MISS HAGER
45 Ninth Avenue West
First National Bank Annex, Eugene, Ore.
Visit The
CARNATION
SHINING PARLORS
An Up-to-Date Place for
Ladies and Gentlemen
978 WILLAMETTE ST.
Opposite Rex Theatre
lr
Depot Lunch Counter
Oysters, Chili and Lunches
Served At All
Hours
R. H. BAKER, PROP.
1*4 iMt Nil* St. PkMM SM
PIERCE BROS.
STAPLE AND FANCY
GROCERIES
L. D. 1'IBRCl, Eu|m«, OrtfM.
Goodyear Welt
Shoe Repairing
JIM--“Shoe Doctor”
BRODERS BROS.
Wholesale and lie tall Dealers la
FRESH MEATS
CORNED MEATS
SMOKED MEATS
Phone 40 Eugeae, Ore.
Tollman Studio
For better photos
J. B. Anderson, Prop.
734 Willamette. Phone 770
BANG’S LIVERY
“THE CLUB”
RISORT FOR OENTLEMEN
BILLIARDS
All Latest Dope on Sports
EIOHTH A E. AND WILLAMETTE OT. JAY MtOORMliA
JEALOUSY
is aroused by all who wear our perfect clothes. Nor
can you blame the jealous one, for he clearly sees
how much better you are dressed than he.
You can be the envied one by letting us furnish you with your
Spring Suit or Overcoat.