Oregon emerald. (Eugene, Or.) 1909-1920, October 28, 1913, Image 2

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    OREGON EMERALD
Published each Tuesday, Thursday
and Saturday of the school year, by
the Associated Students of the Uni
versity of Oregon.
Entered at the postoffice at Eu
gene as second class matter.
Subscription rates, per year, $1.00.
Single copies, 5c.
STAFF.
Kditor-in-C liief.Henry Fowler
Assistant Editor. . .Catharine Carsori
Managing Ed. . .Clarence Brotherton
News Editor.Earl Blackaby
Assistants, . . . .Wallace Eakin, Ruth
Dorris.
City Editor .Jessup Strang
Special Departments.
Special Features ....Lee Hendricks
Exchange .Lamar Tooze
Administration .Roger Moe
Assistant. Leslie Tooze
Dramatic .Mandell Weiss
Society .Beatrice Lilly
Assistant.Florence Thrail
Sports.ltaeman Fleming
Reporters.
Ray Williams, Elsie Gurney, Milton
Stoddard, Evelyn Harding, Beatrice
Locke, Elmer Martin, Blair Holcomb,
Harold Harnstreet, Edison Marshall
Fred Dunbar, Bert Lombard.
Business Staff.
Business Manager . . . Marsh Goodwin
Assistant Mgr. . .Anthony Jaureguy
Circulation Mgr.Dean Peterson
Assistant . Harold Cohen
Advertising Mgr.. .Millar McGiichrist
Assistants—Ben Fleischman, Hugh
Kirkpatrick, Rankin Clark.
1
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 28, J 913.
TOO MUCH OPTIMISM.
A disposition is being evidenced
throughout the state and especially
in the immediate vicinity of the
University to regard the $175,000
appropriation intended for the Uni
versity as already won, and devoted
to the purposes for which it was in
tended, namely the upbuilding of tile
state institution. Possibly this is
due to tlie natural disposition of
mankind to look on the bright side
of things, and possibly to the opti
mistic reports which have appetired
from time to time in the state press,
Ujut as a matter of fact nothing could
bo farther from the truth.
The appropriation is by no means
won, and is, in fact, in more serious
danger of being lost than perhaps
at any other time this fall. There is
still tile attitude of many of the
voters of tile state of wanting to lie
shown, coupled with the intention to
vote against everything that they do
not understand.
This in itself is commendable, but
it must not lie forgotten that such
an attitude on the part, of the people
makes necessary a much larger
amount of work in the way of an
education campaign in regard to the
iiuostions which will bo settled No
vember 4, than would otherwise be
necessary.
The optimism of the Oregon sup
porters at the present time, consti
tutes tlie chief danger to the Uni
versity. The natural tendency is to
lie back and take just a little rest
when tilings seem to be going right,
hut now there is no time t< r such a
layoff, nor Is there any time to make
good the loss occasioned by a rest of
h.s Kin.1 To carry the appropria
tion and save the University men
and women oi the future from tils
tie. i-ity ( . leaving their state for
; ii v.location, as lias been suggested,
i.iv Ives t Co hardest kind of work.
Tin: \utw\ tiiMK.
Nothing is more deceptive to the
athletic dopes!rr titan the element of
comparative scores which constantly
■ utors into any attempt to forecast
the outcome of the -easou's sports.
Nevertheless, the enormous disparity
in results for the ldaiio-Oregon
game and the Washington O. A. U.
contest when compared with the
-cores of last year and with each
other that a hint at least would
seem to be given as to the relative
ability of the two leading teams in
Oregon.
The loss of May is possibly re
sponsible to a large extent, for the
overwhelming defeat sustained by
the O. A. C. eleven Saturday, but In
the two weeks which elapse before
the Albany contest, Dr. Stewart
should easily make good this loss
from his big bunch of substitutes.
The strongest kind of a fight may
be expected from the Corvallis men,
and it is a well assured fact that
their team will have the best of
backing. But in this respect, Ore
gon will not be found wanting, and
it is to be remembered that Oregon
spirit, pure and unadulterated, won
the Albany game. This year—well
it is extremely doubtful if the ful
fillment of that slogan, "Beat Ore
gon,’’ will be found possible.
WALKER COMPLETES
GLEE CLUB SCHEDULE
Gillette Will Go as Soloist, Man
ager Prophesies the Best
Year Ever
Graduate-Manager Walker and
his assistant, Don-Kice, are making
the final arrangements as fasi as
possible for the Glee club trip north
which will be taken after Christmas,
the Club singing in Hood River on
December 2 6, the first date sched
uled.
The Club will go to Boise, Idaho,
this year, which means that this is
the first year the organization has
gone outside of the state on its tours,
i’he most easterly point touched so
far has been Ontario, which is about
one hundred miles this side o.f Boise’.
As added attractions the club will
carry' as soloist Albert Gillette, a
Lugene boy whose voice, according
to Club Director Ralph Lyman, is
an excellent one. “Mr. Gillette's
voice is one of unusual quality and
coupled with his natural ability
makes him a valuable man,” said
Mr. Lyman when speaking of Gil
lette’s voice.
"If tlie trip north proves profita
ble and conditions are such that a
trip south would be advisable, tlife
club will probably take one this
year,” said Manager Walker yester
day. "If not, the two trips, one
Thanksgiving and the other later will
be the only two.
“The club this year will carry 26
men and it will probably be one of
the best years the club has ever
had," says Walker. "The Agricul
tural College’s club and ours will ex
change concerts this year as they did
last. As soon as the quartette which
is now singing in Portland returns,
which will be the last of the week,
pictures of the club will be taken
and our newspaper campaign will be
started. The big posters which are
annually printed and distributed will
ho spread broadcast, and an effect
ive campaign will be Waged to make
this the biggest year the club has
ever had. The schedule of the trip
has not been completed, but will
soon be definitely announced.”
EXAMINATION FOR M. A.
DEGREE TO BE FORMAL
That Candidates Must Appear
Before Public, Is Recent Rule
of the Faculty
In order to accord with recent
changes made by the Faculty, the
candidate for a master’s degree from
! the University must hereafter take
a formal public examination.
Heretofore the candidate has tak
en 1\is examination in private. I'n
! der the changed rules the examina
tion will become a formal event and
t !•> public will be invited to attend
The eundiadte’s major and minor
professors, together with another
member of the Faculty, will give the
examination
i The new plan is patterned after
(the one followed in the Herman uni
versities. except that the Herman
j universities adopt a more formal
mode of examination. The candi
i date appears before the examining
) hoard in full dress attire and amid
very formal ceremonies The exatn
i illations at Oregon, however, will not
| hi* carried to this extent.
The University of Illinois has pur
chased a 320 acre farm for $256,000.
The Fraternities at Ohio State
l Diversity have united in enforcing
the wearing of the Freshmen caps.
FACULTY DIVIDED AS
TO REFERENDUM OUTCOME
Women’s Votes Counted on to
Affect Change From Show
ing of 1812
Opinion, both optimistic and pes>
simistie, concerning the results of
the coming election, were expressed j
this morping by several of the Uni- !
versity faculty women.
“Present indications seem favora- j
ble to us,” said Mrs. Ellen Pennell, j
“During the last two or three weeks, j
there seems to have been a change in !
our favor, in the political horizon, j
And I shall be quite surprised,” she j
continued,” if the women’s votes So
not show a majority in favor of the
appropriation.”
Miss Burgess spoke of the impor
tance of the women voting at this
election, “ft is particularly impor
tant," she said, “that the women
show by this election, their interest
in public affairs, and their influence
in attempting to set things right,
because the results of the election
are being awaited all over the Unit
ed States, and will be used as an ar
gument either for or against suf
frage.”
Dr. Bertha Stewart appeared less
enthusiastic. “We shall just have
;o wait utnil election and see,” she
said.
And according to Mrs. Mabel Par
sons, it is never wise to be too sure.
Optimism isn’t the safest policy,”
.-,he said, “because it influences peo
ple sometimes to desist from further I
effort.”
LAUREAN SOCIETY MEETS
l*rograni of Literary Society Devoted
to Tennyson
The program of the Laurean So- i
iety tonight will consist of a dis-,
aission of Alfred Lord Tennyson. |
Luton Ackerson will give a criti-!
cal outline of Tennyson's work, Man- j
lei Weiss will give a short biogra
phy of the life of the great poet,;
and Lloyd Dawson will give readings;
from Tennyson's works.
The Laurean Society expects a
larger attendance this evening than
has been yet in evidence this year. j
GERMAW CLUB WILL MEET
_
Wagner Program Will be Given at !
Delta Gamma
The German Club will meet at
the Delta Gamma House Tuesday, j
October 28. A Wagner program will
be rendered as follows:
Life of Wagner.Maude Mastick !
Wagner as a Musician ..Rose Price
Vocal Solo .Marie Churchill
> Review of Wagner’s Operas,.,..
. Mr. O’Donnell
Instrumental Solo ...Miss Hawkins
Every one interested in German
is cordially invited to attend. An
swer to roll-call will be made by re
peating a German proverb.
The fraternities and cluba at Ohio
have organized to cut down the high
cost of living.
ooooooooooooooooo
° 0
O SOCIETY 0
O o
o By Beatrice Lilly. o
o o
ooooooooooooooooo
The Phi Delta Theta fraternity
entertained last Saturday night
with an informal dance, giv
en in honor of nine visit
ing Phi Delta Thetas from Idaho,
who are members of the football
team that played Oregon this after
noon. Dr. and Mrs. W. M. Smith
were chaperons. The. guests of honor
are: Coach Griffith, W. Johnson, J.
S. Phillips, Hedley Dingle, James
Kane, James Lockhart, Mr. Groni
ger, Mr. Dewald, Arthur Jardine and
Stanley Brown.
* *
Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Means
stopped in Eugene Saturday on their
way south where they will spend a
few weeks. They are on their wed
ding journey.
* *
Mr. and Mrs. Arthur G. Means
were entertained at dinner at the
Beta Theta Phi house on Saturday.
* *
Ralph Moores spent the week-end
in Eugene.
• •
Will Cake and Kenneth Frazier
were at the Fiji house during the
week-end.
* •
Lenora Hansen spent the week-end
at the Gamma Phi Beta house.
* *
Robert Webb and Wm. Luxton of
O. A. C. were week-end guests at
the Avava club.
* *
The Zeta Phi fraternity entertain
ed the Delta Gamma sorority in
honor of their recent installation of
the latter with a dance last Satur
day evening.
Guests besides the members of
Delta Gamma we're: Miss Pugh,
from Brownsville, Miss Beatrice
Thurston, of St. Helen’s Hall, Pliny
Daniels of Astoria, Aubrey Bond, a
former member of the class of 1912
in the University of Oregon, Frank
Scaeife, Glen Wheeler, Don Pague,
Morris Bigbee, Frank Beach, Willard
Carpy, Russell Ralston, Ray Wil
liams, Dal King, Harmon Northrup#»
ooooooooooooooooo
A iV NO U NCEMENTS.
Women’s Ijeague-»-Meeting of
the Women's League,
Wednesday, October 29, 4
1>. m., in Dr. Straub's room.
Eutaxian—Meeting in Dr.
Schafer’s room Tuesday at
7 : 30 p. m.
Laurean—Meeting at 7:15
Tuesday evening.
Telephone all announcements
to Main 055.
German Club—Meeting to
night at the Delta Gamma
House.
Assembly—Address by C. J.
Woodbury.
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UNIVERSITY WILL RECEIVE APPROPRIATIONS
Pearl Tangley, tlu> most noted woman in ^America, was asked regard
ing the I'niversity of Oregon appropriations, at her performance last night,
and gave assurances that they would carry by a good majority.
She answered many questions of all kinds, did wonderful figure
I reading and adding that was marvelous. Nearly 1600 people saw her at
| the Savoy lasf night, hundreds were turned away. To accommodate all
I the Savoy will open tonight at 6:45 promptly. Mine. Tangley will appear
at 3:30 each afternoon and at two night performances. Come early.
I
OREGON RESTAURANT
AND CAFETERIA
1192 East Ninth
Best Served Meal in the
City. Noodles and Chop
Suey every day and night.
Ling Toy & Wong Sing
Proprietors
Again at your Grocers
Diili
better than ever
Makes Whiter,Lighter Bread
Registered Optometrists
Factory on Premises
Eye Specialists
Exclusive Opticians
881 Willamette Street
'Phone 362
DR. J. O. WATTS
Eyesight Specialist
Optical defects corrected and satisfaction
guaranteed. Examinations free and the
prices moderate. Broken lenses duplicate
ed within an hour or two. Factory on the
premises.
Opposite Savoy Theater
Office Phone 552. Bes. Phone 611 - R
DR. C. M. HARRIS
DENTIST
Cockerline & Wetherbee Bldg.
8th and Willamettes Sts. Eugene, Or.
L. M. TRAVIS
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
Over Eugene Loan & Savings Bank
104 East Ninth St. Phone 246
PIERCE BROS.
STAPLE AND FANCY
GROCERIES
L. D. PIERCE, Eugene, Oregon.
Toilet Waters and
Perfumes m
The kind the feminine heart will delight in—
Softening waters that diffuse the fragrance of the
flower in full bloom. Perfumes from over the seas,
Toilet Waters both imported and domestic—with
full stress laid upon those from the far-off Orient.
Kaubigaut’s Ideal, Piver’s Floramea and Azorea
Violets Amberoyal, Fournesse, Colgate’s and the
full Palmers’ lines, all Babcock’s, Corylopsis of
Japan, as well as many others to select from.
Up to $2.50 the Ounce
Special
T rain
Service
ro THE
University of Oregon
Oregon Agricultural College
FOOTBALL GAME
Albany, Saturday, Nov. 8
3 p. m., Sharp
Official Train of Varsity Student Body will leave
Eugene About 12:30 p. m.
$1.50—FARE FOR THE ROtND-TRIP-$1.50
Further details of train schedules for the day of the
game, etc., cheerfully given upon application to
# H. R. KNIGHT, Agt., Eugene, Or.