Oregon emerald. (Eugene, Or.) 1909-1920, April 21, 1913, Image 1

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_ W EK___UNIVERSITY OF OREGON. EUGENE, TUESDAY, APRIL 21. 1913. y j ^
OLYMPIC STARS
f
’ PHII BROOK, HAWKINS AND BEL
, LAH TO APPEAR IN MEET
WITH OREGON
♦ SATURDAY
r -
■ DOPE FAVORS DIVERSITY
__
’ McClure, Huggins and Windnagle Look
Good for Many Distance
' Points.
After the Multnomah meet on Kin
caid field next Saturday, “dopsters”
will find themselves in an easier posi
tion to figure out Oregon’s chances in
the Northwest Conference Meet at
Walla Walla in May.
Multnomah Manager Optimistic.
Manager Schmitt, of the M. A. A.
C., seems optimistic as to the out
come of the meet. “I expect to take
twelve men with me to Eugene Satur
day,” he said. “I expect first places
in the 100 yard dash, high and low
hurdles, broad jump, discus throw,
and the pole vault.” Multnomah stock
rose several points last week when
George Philbrook, the great all
around Olympic athlete, and former
football and track star at Whitman
and Notre Dame, appeared under the
Multnomah colors. He is a big 205
pound athlete who holds such records
as 46 feet 6 inches in the shot put,
discus, 142 feet; high jump, 6 feet 1.
W. A. A. C. Given Six Firsts.
Conceding Multnomah first place in
the six events, “Dope” has it that
we should draw strongly for second
and third in the discus, a possible sec
ond in the high jump and third in the
shot put.
The 440 with such men as Windna
gle, Boylen, and Barber entered, the
880 under the supervision of Wind
nagle and McClure, and the mile and
two mile instrusted to McClure, Hug
gins, and Pack, seem to place Oregon
ahead for these events. But the pole
vault belongs to Bellah, of the Club,
who has a record of over 12 feet 6
inches, and the high and low hurdles
appear very much like the property of
Hawkins and Bibee. The 100 yard and
220 yard dashes are not so certain.
At Columbia, Kay and Kiser both
edged out ahead of the Columbia’s en
tries in the 220, but the 100 was not
run at that time and this result is
hard to predict.
Parsons Should Take Broad Jump.
Johnny Parsons lost out in the
broad jump because of unfamiliarity
with the take off, but Saturday he
should press Bellah and Hawkins
close for first place. Neill and Hei
denreich, the javelin and discus twins,
feel capable of figuring in these two
events against Philbrook and Bellah.
0. A. C. COED DROWNED
Kate O'Connor, of Montague, Cal.,
Drowned While Canoeing on
Mary’s River Sundey
Corvallis, Or., Apr. 20—Kate O’Con
nor, of Montague, California, a Junior
student in the Domestic Science class
at Oregon Agricultural College, was
drowned at 5:30 P. M. today while
canoeing on the Mary’s River with
Robert Savage, of Salem, a Sopho
more in the class of Mechanical En
gineering.
The accident occurred four miles
up stream from Corvallis, in a swift
current, and the canoe was capsized
when it struck a log while the occu
pants were endeavoring to turn round.
The party, which included Miss
O’Connor and Mr. Savage, was break
ing a strict rule of the college, which !
forbids any girl going on the water
without having filed the written con-1
sent of her parents to engage in j
aquatic sports.
Rival Oregon and Washington Captains and Pitchers
Welch, Pitcher. *
Stub Kerry, Pitcher.
Capt. Jack Johnson, Pitcher.
I
Capt. Ben Chandler.
Lyle Bigbee, Pitcher.
Willis Bout man. Pitcher.
COLUMBIA BEET AGAIN
CAPTURED BE OREGOI
Varsity Wins for Fifth Consecutive
Time, With 34 Points to 24
for O. A. C.
“Bill” Hayward and his track squad
were in Portland Saturday, April 13,
and for the fifth consecutive time
walked away with the purple banner
at the annual Columbia University in
door track and field meet, scoring 34
points. O. A. C. landed in second
place with 24 points, while the Mult
nomah Club, of Portland, took third
honors, by scoring 17 points.
Oregon’s Victory a Surprise.
Oregon’s decisive victory came
somewhat as a surprise, as the dope
sters had predicted a close meet, with
Multnomah a slight favorite. The ab
sence of Baker, the Aggies’ star
sprinter, and the fact that Philbrook,
Bellah and Johns did not compete for
the Winged M, aided Oregon materi
ally in easily romping away with the
meet.
Walters, of O. A. C., broke the only
record, when he finished the 440-yard
dash in the fast time of 53 3-5 sec
onds. Johns, of Oregon, held the pre
vious indoor record of 54 seconds,
made in the 1910 meet. Windnagle
ran Walters a close second in this
event.
Walters and Windnagle Tie.
Walters, of O. A. C., and Windna
gle, of Oregon, with eight points each,
shared honors as individual point win
ner. Oregon took four first places,
Multnomah Club three and O. A. C.
two. High School athletes picked up
several seconds and thirds in the open
(Continued on last page.)
"MOTHER, PM R PIECE OF CREPE
OR ME,” SUNG OT J WORD ARNEY
Former Washington Ball Player, Vic
tim of Little Joke by Sigma
Nu Brothers.
J. Ward Arney, baseball writer for
the Emerald, used to play baseball
with the University of Washington.
The University of Washington is
noted for being the stamping grounds
of a lot of red hot fans of 57 varie
ties.
And J. Ward Arney was one of
them.
Recently, however, one University
of Oregon baseball team cleaned up
the Evergreen team in two straight
games. Naturally Arney was a little
chagrined. And to complete the joke,
his Sigma Nu brothers hung a big
black bow of crepe, the regular
mourning kind, on his door.
With a smile, Arney took the decor
ations down yesterday afternoon, with
the remark, “The boys are trying to
play a little joke on me. Nothin’
doin’.”
Geisler Makes Canoe Trip to Portland.
Carlyle Geisler ana Alfred Parker,
of Portland, paddled a canoe to Port
land during the April vacation. Rain
• he first day cause'.’ a little discom
fort, they say, but outside of that they
report a very pleasant trip. Their
running time from Eugene to Oregon
City was in the neighborhood of 24
hours actually on the water, nearly
three days being taken to make the
trip.
Leland Stanford Finch, ex-’15, was
recently elected president of the Baker
High Alumni Association.
DOUGHNUT MILL
SERIES OPENS TODiV
Came Between Alpha Tau Onega and
Avava Club Begins League
Contests.
The directors of the Interfraternity
Athletic League met yesterday after
noon and drew up a revised schedule
for the Doughnut Baseball series
which opened today with a game be
tween Alpha Tau Omega and Avava
Club. All games in this series will be
of seven innings, starting about 5:30
in the afternoon. They will be in
charge of Edward Schockley as um
pire, while Ward Arney will be official
scorer.
In addition to arranging the base
ball schedule, final plans were com
pleted for the inter-fraternity track
meet to be held Saturday mornintr.
May 3.
Bill Hdyward will have charge of
the track meet, assisted by Mason
Roberts as official starter. Each
team will be limited to five men; all
varsity track men who have on their
letters will be barred from the meet,
in addition to the regular cup offered
by a local jeweler to the club or fra
ternity landing in first place Bill
Hayward has again come forward
with a handsome silver, cup to be pre
sented to the whining felay, team. . *
Woman’s Meeting Thursday. 0 °
The Woman’s Athletic Council
will hold an important meeting at 5
o’clock on Thursday, April 24. All
members are urged to be present to or
ganize the various sports, tennis,
archery, canoeing, etc., active work
in which will begin Monday, April 28.
UNIVERSITY PROFESSOR WILKS
TWENTY-SIX MILES IFTER ONE FISH
Ur. Gilbert Shows Perseverance in
His Fishing Methods During
Vacation.
A vacation may be a vacation, but
not when one has to walk twenty-six
miles for one measly fish, especially
when fishing is your favorite pastime
for an idle week.
But this happened to Doctor James
Henry Gilbert, assistant professor of
Economics, and graduate of the Uni
versity of Oregon, last week while
visiting his former classmate, Oscar
Gorrell, who is farming in Douglas
county.
Fishing continually for thirteen
miles up a small tributary of the
Umpqua river, the exponent of Taus
sig caught one little trout, barely
over the legal limit of six inches.
FRIENDS OF UNIVERSITY
ORGANIZE TO ASSIST
OPPOSITION TO REFERENDUM
FROM MANY SOURCES
Oregon Women Active in Fight
Against Threatened Attempt to
Block University Progress.
(By Harold Young.)
Opposition to the threatened refer
endum movement against the Univer
sity appropriations has assumed defi
nite form during the past two weeks,
through the creation of bodies of
workers organized to combat the sen
timent as it appears and, through the
intention expressed by many of the
papers of the state to oppose the
movement to refer the money grant
or to consolidate the two institutions,
O. A. C. and the University.
Growing out of the two meetings
held at the Multnomah Hotel in Port
land, called by the State Federation of
Women’s Clubs, there cnme the Ore
gon Citizen’s Educational League. Of
this organization, Eugene Brookins is
president, and associated with him are
Dr. J. R. Wilson, Alten Eaton, B. F.
Irvine, of the Journal, II. B. Miller,
Fletcher Linn, Mrs. S. Hirsch, Austin
Buxton, of the State Grange, H. W.
Stone, of the Portland Y. M. C. A.,
and A. H. Harris, of the Portland La
bor Press.
Following this organization, Col. E.
Hofer, President of the State Press
Association, and others, formed the
People’s Higher Educational League,
at a meeting Saturday, April 19, in
the Portland Chamber of Commerce.
Present at this time was a delegation
from the other body, which met a
special committee from the People’s
League. Through these committees,
the two organizations agreed to co
operate with one another, but to keep
the associations separate and distinct.
The executive committee of the Peo
ple’s League is composed of Colonel
Hofer, C. C. Chapman, Dr. Marie Equi,
of Portland, Judge T. J. Geisler, H. L
Vorst, of the Society of Engineers,
of Portland, J. E. Werlein, of Portland,
and others. This committee was to
have met yesterday to appoint sub
committees and start the factual iam
paign for the University0of the State,
.but on»account°of the death of Colo
nel Hofer’s brother in Salem, this
I meeting was postponed one week.
Complete organization of the Ore
gon Citizens’ League was effected yes
terday in Portland. A constitution
was adopted, a governing board ap
pointed, and the officers pro-tem per
[ manently elected. Among those on
; the governing board are J. N. Teal, 0.
(Continued on page two.)
CHANDLER’S MEN DEFEAT W. S.
C. TWICE, THEN TAKE U. OF
W. TEAM INTO CAMP BY
GREAT FIELDING
PITCHERS’ WORK EXCELLENT
Games With Pullman Do Not Count
In League Reckoning. Cap
tain Ben Leads Batters
* * * * ******
Western Division *
* W L P. C. *
* Oregon .2 0 1.000 *
* 0. A. C.0 0 1.000 *
* Washington .0 2 .000 *
Eastern Division *
* W L P. C. *
* Pullman .2 0 1.000 *
* Whitman .0 0 .000 *
* Idaho .0 2 .000 *
* * * * * » a. .. . .
(By J. Ward Arney.)
Playing with a fighting spirit that
carried everything before it and with
a consistency that surpassed the
hopes of its most sanguine support
ers, the Varsity baseball squad re
turned yesterday from its vacation
trip, dangling from its belt the scalps
of the University of Washington and
Washington State College These
victories are the more creditable in
view of the fact that dopesters had
it figured that Oregon had but a slim
chance of barely breaking even, bas
ing their opinions on the weakening
effect that lack of practice had had
on the team, rather than any inher
ent deficiency in its makeup* But
Captain Chandler and his boy-friends
completely upset the deductions of
the wise ones. They hit, ran the
bases and fielded like fiends, and the
pitchers dished out an article of hurl
ing that brooked of no defeat. The
Continued on page 3.
CONMEB EMUS
HOW IIM HAPPENED
Players in Good Physical Condition;
Adapt in Learning quickly—but
Series Not Won Yet.
(By Fred C. Ayer.)
I attribute the really phenomenal
success of the team on their northern
trip to a combination of factors. Des
pite the lack of satisfactory outdoor
practice, the team was in first class
physical condition by virtue of previ
ous gymnastic or athletic work, and
by making the very most of the time
that we had. The team is in fact re
markable exceptional in speed and
physical ability for a college team.
“All the coaching and practice
moreover was centered on the rapidly
approaching series. Only such team
plays and signal combinations were
attempted as could be mastered thor
oughly for this trip. \Ve were fortu
nate in having a class of pUiyers who
could learn these in about one half -
the time required by most teams.
Practically =all of the men have goad
baseball “sense,” as well as native
ability, and coaching has been simply
a matter of fitting a “system” to the
team.
“We have never been worried about
the ultimate fielding of the team. .^11
that is needed is ordinary practice
and time to learn the teamwork of the
more comprehensive defensive plays.
“So far, outside of the battery de
partment which I have always felt
would be strong, the attention has
been chiefly given to the offense, a
vital part of the game in which the
team work is not even suspected by
(Continued on last page.) *