Oregon emerald. (Eugene, Or.) 1909-1920, February 25, 1913, Image 1

Below is the OCR text representation for this newspapers page. It is also available as plain text as well as XML.

    BASKETBALL
Washington State vs. Uni
versity of Oregon. Wed
nesday and Thursday
evenings. Games called
at 8 o’clock.
OREGON
EMERALD
IMPORTANT
Student Body Meeting.
Tomorrow at ten
o’clock.
PUBLISHED THREE TIMES A WEEK
UNIVERSITY OF OREGON. EUGENE, TUESDAY. FEBRUARY 25. 1913.
Vol. XIV; No. 60
GtPIl SIMS’ MEN
TO Pitt W. S. G. FIVE
TEAM IN FAIR SHAPE—GEORGE
STEVENSON WILL BE
TRIED OUT AT
CENTER
W. S. G. REPORTED STRONG
Blackman Plans Organized Rooting—
Sims Favors Scheme as Helpful
to Players.
With Fenton, the big center, around
whom the development of team work
depended, unable to play in either
game, the University basketball team
will meet the Washington State Col
lege five tomorrow and Thursday
evenings, in two more attempts to
add a little lustre to a dingy record
of defeat.
Besides the incapacity of Fenton,
whose bruised back was made worse
by an osteopath, Bradshay, the big
guard, has a hard luck contribution
in the shape of two badly blistered
feet, that show up his playing. The
rest of the men are in good shape,
even Boylen has forgotten the ab
?ence of his tooth.
New Center Is Possibility.
Hayward is a sphinx as to his final
fine up; Love, the W. S. C. center, is
a moose, so Bill says, and as a result
he gave George Stevenson, a big,
rangy six footer, a thorough try-out
this afternoon, for the purpose of get
ting a line on him as a pivotal possi
bility. As to the remainder of the
line up, it is a question of matching
wits with the Pullman crowd. Samp
son and Lowry are two powerful run
ning guards, and may necessitate a
shake up in the forward crowd for
Oregon.
The W. S. C. team was beaten last
evening by Washington in Seattle,
nnd should they make a decided effort
tonight to avoid further damage to
their pearly clean slate, Hayward
figures that the invaders will be in
poor shape for their tangle here.
(Continued on last page.)
CONTEST ROTES MADE
Bt : ;u'tt Prize Committee Makes Reg
ulations and Suggests
Subjects.
Regulations governing the compe
tition for the Bennett prize were an
nounced this morning by the faculty
committee in charge of the choice of
subjects and conditions of the con
test. The Bennett prize is awarded
each year from a fund given the Uni
versity by the late Philo Sherman
Bennett, of New Haven, Connecticut,
for the best essay written by any
student upon principles of free gov
ernment. The prize this year will be
awarded about the middle of June.
Last year Oscar Haugen, ’14, of
Portland, won the first prize money.
The subjects recommended by the
committee for this year, are “Sug
gestions Toward the Solution of the
Race Problem in the South,” “What
Will the Opening of the Panama Ca
nal Mean to the Pacific Northwest,”
“Woman in the Twentieth Century
Democracy,” “Oregon and Conserva
tion,” and “The Emergence of the
Continuing Progressive.”
The rules laid down for the congest
this year specify that two thousand
words shall be the minimum, and that
the papers shall be filed with the Reg
istrar on or before the third Monday
in May. A pseudonym shall be used
on the paper proper, Dut with the real
name of the contestant in a sealed
envelope. References must be cited
exactly for all statement of fact, and
the committee will withhold the prize,
should it consider that no paper mer
its the award.
WITH MAJORITY OF FRESHMEN
DORM FACES INTERNAL STRIFE
Report Is That Several Men Are
Seeking Outside Lodging—Matron
Not Worried.
Twenty-five men, half of the pres
ent population of the University Dor
mitory, are said to be planning to
leave and seek board elsewhere as the
reoiilt ui an announcement made yes
terday by the matron, Mrs. Elizabeth
Prescott, that certain students would
be expelled from the Dormitory if
there were any further manifesta
tions of the apparently popular Dorm
game of “rough house.” It seems
that several rooms have been
“stacked” recently, and the complaint
of the inmates to Mrs. Prescott
brought forth the ultimatum men
tioned above. It is understood that
part of the students included are al
ready on probation.
The announcement had a contrari
wise effect, however, for several up
perclassmen and a number of Fresh
men promptly announced their inten
tion to leave. The latter, under the
leadership of Chester Fee and Harry
Crain, are understood to be out this
afternoon looking for a house in
which to start a boarding club of
their own.
Mrs. Prescott, when interviewed this
afternoon, said that the reports were
greatly exaggerated. “There has
been considerable disorder in the
Dormitory this year, due largely to
the fact that Freshmen are in the
majority, and that bath tubbing or
similar disciplining measures are not
allowed, have become so obstreperous
as to interfere unduly with the stu
dies of others.
OREGON LOSE5FOURTH
GAME 10 WASHINGTON
29 TO 15 FINAL SCORE IN SATUR
DAYS GAME WITH U. OF W.
Washington Center Runs 14 of Total
Tally—Tomorrow and Thursday
Set for W. S. C.
The University of Washington bas
ketball team defeated the varsity five
for the fourth time this season, when
they won an easy 29 to 15 game, Sa
turday night, in the local gymnasium.
The contest was too uneven to be par
ticularly interesting, although there
were several Oregon rallies in the sec
ond half, which were encouraging to
the crowd of rooters, who had assem
bled on the bleachers at the north end
of the “gym.” The absence of Fen
ton from the line-up was a great
drawback to Oregon, as he had been
depended upon to hold down Savage,
the great Washington center, who
scored 14 points for his team. Savage
and Captain Byler were again the
stars for the Northerners and seemed
to have no difficulty in shooting bas
kets from any point on the floor.
For Oregon, Captain Sims and the
two midget forwards, Brooks and
Boylen, played the best game. Cap
tain Sims scored 9 of the 15 points
made by his team, while although
Brooks and Boylen scored but one
basket apiece, their work in covering
the floor was remarkable, considering
the hard game played the night be
fore.
Tomorrow and Thursday nights,
Oregon will play Washington State
College two games, and it is thought
that the varsity will retrieve some of
the lost honors, as Fenton may be
able to enter the game.
Summary of the game:
Oregon. Washington.
Boylen (2) ._...f.Byler (7)
Brooks (2)..f.McFee (4)
Walker (2).c.Savage (14)
Bradshaw .g. Wand
Sims (9).g.Fancher (4)
Vosper, substitute, forward.
Rice, substitute, guard.
EARL NO! OFFERED
REPORTS EXAGGERATE IMPORT
ANCE OF ACTION OF GEARY
IN SUBMITTING
CONTRACT
SEEKS DIRECT APPLICATION
Oregon Committee Wants Understand
ing With Earl When it Considers
Other Applications.
The football coach for next year is
still an unsettled matter. Reports that
Virgil Earl has been awarded the con
tract are erroneous, although the terms
of a contract have been sent to him
for consideration. Manager Arthur
M. Geary wrote to Mr. Earl, stating
that he had no authority to let a con
tract, but merely desires to state the
proposition that the Athletic Council
is willing to offer, that is $2,000 a
year, as a salary for coach, which in
cludes a position on the faculty.
“There are 15 or 16 candidates for
the position of football coach,” said
Graduate Manager Geary, “five or six
of whom are being carefully investi
gated by the Coaching Committee of
the Athletic Council, which is com
posed of Dr. H. B. Leonard, Captain
Bradshaw, and Manager Geai-y.”
“Virgil Earl, or no man has been
tendered the position as yet,” says
Mr. Geary. “An effort has been made
to ascertain whether Virgil Earl de
sires to be considered among the can
didates for the position, but no offer
of a position has been made him. The
work of the Coach Committee In in
vestigating the candidates for the po
sition of coach is preliminary in its
nature, and must be ratified by the
Athletic Council.
“If Earl could be had at reasonable
terms,” continued Mr. Geary, “it is
certain that his candidacy would re
ceive much attention from the coach
ing committee .
HE HUD DRAMATIC
GLASS TO GIVE PLAY
“Servant in the House,” Will be Put
On at Eugene Theatre, Friday,
March 7.
The next play which is to be pre
sented by the Dramatic Interpreta
tion Class will be “The Servant in the
House,” by Charles Raun Kennedy,
March 7, in the Eugene Theatrr.
The cast has been working on this
play for some time. The characters
represented are:
James Ponsonby Makeshyfte, D.
D., the most Reverend the Lord
Bishop of Lancashire.
.Alfred Skei
The Reverend William Smythe, the
vicar .Alexander Martin
Auntie .Hilda Brant
Mary .Their Niece
Mr. Robert Smith, a gentleman of
necessary cocupation.
. Carlton Spencer
Rogers, a page boy.Walter Dimm
Manson, a butler.Prof. Reddie
FROSH ELECT DELEGATES
AND RE-ASSESS TAX LEVY
Leslie Tooze and Allen O’Connell
were elected Freshmen delegates to
the Oratorical convention at New
berg, at a Freshman class meeting
this afternoon.
The proposition of levying another
fifty cent class tax to raise money for
the class debt did not receive a single
vote, but instead a motion was made
and carried' to collect the formerD as
sessed tax from the 100 members of
the class who have not paid.
BILL HAYWARD WANTED
Bl GERMAN ATHLETES
MAY BE VISITED BY DIEM. THE
GENERAL SECRETARY OF
THE GERMAN OLYMPIC
COMMITTEE
ONE OTHER CONSIDERED
Germans Making Thorough Prepara
tions to Build Up Team Which
Can Compete With Americans.
Bill Hayward, Oregon’s veteran
trainer, is under consideration by the
German Olympic committee, prepar
ing to win the 1916 meet at Berlin,
as one of two desirable men to train
the German athletes. He will be vis
ited this spring by Carl Diem, general
secretary of the Olympic committee,
who declares that Hayward may be
induced to assume command of the
German athletic forces.
The news came to Hayward yester
day, when he received from a friend
in the east a clipping written by
William G. Shepherd, a Berlin sports
writer, who quotes Carl Diem. The
latter says:
“In addition to Dr. Alvin Kranz
lein, I have heard much of William
Hayward, of Oregon University, and
expect to see both men in the spring.
I hope to induce one to take charge
of our athletes.”
The Germans have already con
j structed a gfieat half-million-dollar
I stadium in Berlin in preparation for
the 1916 Olympic meet. It has been
constructed three years before it is
needed.
“Why the haste?” Mr. Diem was
asked, after he had mentioned Hay
ward.
“We want to hold meets there to
get used to the Stadium,” he admitted
frankly. “We have arranged to teach
i field sports in the public schools, and
each spring and fall we will hold
(Continued on last page.)
TAKEN YET
ON THE REFERENDUM
i
So Declares Campbell, Who Conferred
With Raton at Salem on Return
from Portland.
President P. L. Campbell returned
from Portland last evening, where he
has been for several days on business,
and visiting with Mrs. Campbell. He
reports that everything is quiet in re
gard to the referendum on the Uni
versity appropriation. On his way
back from Portland he stopped sev
eral hours in Salem, where he con
ferred with Representative Eaton,
from Lane county. Mr. Eaton said,
that nothing definite had been done as
yet on the referendum movement,
threatened by H. J. Parkison last
Friday.
“As far as I could learn,” said
President Campbell, “no action has
been taken yet to kill the appropria
tions made by the Legislature. The
leaders of the movement will prob
ably not do anything for another week
or two.”
Harvard University and the Massa
chusetts Agricultural College tied for
first place in the Eastern Rifle League.
West Virginia has finished first in the
Western division for championship
of the inter-collegiate rifle matches
of the United States.
Arlie Mucks, from Oshkosh, has
decided to enter Wisconsin in prefer
ence to Yale, Cotnell, qr Chicago.
The addition of this athlete to Wis
consin will add to the strength of
Wisconsin in track and also be a big
help in football. °
TIRED OF HIS ABSENCE, REYNOLDS’
TRUNK TAKEN TO CHI OMEGA HOUSE
After Protracted Visit. Fraternity De
cides to make His Return a
.Memorable One.
As the penalty for an unusually pro
tracted absence from the Beta Theta
1’i house last Sunday, Charley Rey
nolds, '14, was compelled to trudge
home with his trunk late Sunday
evening, after that receptacle had been
deposited upon the Chi Omega porch,
full of his personal belongings.
Suspecting that the nearby soror
ity house was the retreat of the ab
sent one, and highly incensed by the
scant attention given his fraternity
brothers, the dire plan of revenge
and retaliation was planned and exe
cuted by them under cover of dark
ness. Without discretion as to choice
of articles transported, a large stor
age trunk and three much battered
suit cases were brought into action.
With stealthy tread the much labeled
instruments of embarrassment were
softly deposited beside the door; to
await the return of Reynolds.
In due time he found them, and with
Earl Fortmi’ler as his Jeff, the trunk
was brought home.
Greek letter men in the State of
Wisconsin are worrying about their
chances of existence like those in
Ohio, for a bill abolishing fraternities
has been introduced into the Wiscon
sin state legislature.
Albany College will be represented
in oratory by Miss .Jessie Telford at
the State Inter-collegiate Oratorical
Contest, which is to b<’ held at New
berg.
MUSTER'S WORK
MEANS MUCH TO U.
SHOWS FFICIENCY OF DEPART
MENTS, SAYS SVARVERUD
County Judge Thompson Also Inter
ested in Work of Engineering
Dept.—May Affect Policy.
“The announcement of Dr. McAlis
tr of his conclusions on road construc
tion in this state means a great thing
not only to the state and to Lane
county,” declared M. Svarverud, of
Eugene, president of the Lane Coun
ty Good Roads Association, today,
“but it means much to the Univer
sity. It is a graphic example of the
real work that is continually being
carried on in the various depart
ments.
“If practical demonstration shows
that what he said is true—and my
acquaintance with Dr. McAlister con
vinces me that it is true, for he is
very conservative,—it is the end of
macadam pavement and the bringing
of hard surface in this state.
“We have long known that maca
dam is not the proper road for Ore
gon because of the destructive action
of our wet winters. The water cuts
up the road and washes out the bind
ing. That concrete roads—read hard
surface pavement—can be construct
ed in its stead, is one of the greatest
boons not only to this county, but to
the whole state.
“The University's discovery will
doubtless change the entire road pol
icy of the county as soon as it can
be demonstrated.”
“If Dr. McAlister’s discoveries are
true,” declared Judge Helmus W.
Thompson, of I.ane county, it will
mean a gTeat deal to the county.”
Judge Thompson is one of Oregon’s
most active good roads enthusiasts
and controls the road policy in this
county.
Tobogganing is the favorite winter
sport of the University of Wisconsin.
A long slide, nearly perfect, has been
built down Observatory Hill, out upon
Lake Mendota.
BASEBALL PRACTICE
10 SHOT TOMORROW
LACK OF FUNDS MAY PREVENT
ATHLETIC COUNCIL FROM
HIRING PROFESSIONAL
COACH
TOWN NINE TO PLAY VARSITY
Candidates for Team Sufficient to
Gratify Chandler—Must Look
for Shortstop.
The first baseball practice of the
season is called by Captain Ben
Chandler for Wednesday afternoon.
The grounds will be put into condi
tion Monday and Tuesday.
The coach question will come before
the Athletic Council this week, but
Oregon’s chances for a professional
coach are meagre because of the ex
isting financial conditions of the Stu
dent Body. Should the Athletic
Council fail to provide a coach, Cap
tain Chandler will doubtlessly be
given charge of the squad. This plan
was successfully worked out last year
when Captain Homer Jamison brought
the Varsity through the season with
out defeat.
A town team, organized by Ralph
Newland, will be available to give
the Varsity weekly practice.
The inter-fraternity games will be
gin in about three weeks. At pres
ent the cup is in possession of the Phi
Gamma Delta fraternity, and should
they win it again, it will become per
manent property. Arrangements are
under way for a series of inter-class
games to be played immediately.
The tour of the Inland Empire dur
ing the spring vacation will make
places on the team hotly contested.
This trip includes games with Wil
lamette University, Multnomah Club,
Washington State College, Gonzago
College, and University of Washing
ton.
The candidates that have announced
themselves for the team are: Catcher,
Motschenbacher, Reed, and Thatcher;
pitcher, Weldh, Tuerck, L. Bigbee,
and Provost; first base, Fenton and
Billings; second base, Cornell and
Buck Bigbee; short stop, no candi
dates; third base, Anunsien; outfield,
Captain Chandler, Mount, Kirk, and
Vosper.
SOPHS HOLD ELECTION
Elect Geisler Treasurer and Choose
Class Orators for Oratorical
Contest.
At a special meeting of the Sopho
more class in Dr. Schmidt’s room
yesterday afternoon, Carlyle Geisler
was elected class treasurer to suc
ceed Clark Hawley, who has gone to
California. James Donald, of Baker,
and Hazel Tooze, of Oregon City,
were elected to represent the class at
the annual inter-collegiate oratorical
contest at Newberg, March 7.
A motion to award class debaters
the class numerals was the subject
of considerable discussion, and finally
passed with the amendment that the
team be awarded the numerals, pro
viding they win. This was intended
to promote further interest in the
coming try-outs for the Sophomore
Freshman debate.
A motion was carried to the effect
that the numerals be ordered and
awarded to those earning them last
year. The executive committee was
empowered to interpret the provision
in the class constitution awarding
numerals to the members of the Glee
Club.
Stanford’s former Hawaiian catcher
is trying out for the position of
backstop with the University of Chi
cago.