Oregon emerald. (Eugene, Or.) 1909-1920, February 22, 1913, Image 2

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    OREGON EMERALD
Published each Tuesday. Thursday and
Saturday, of the school year, by the As
sociated Students of the t'nlverslty of
Oregon.
Entered at the postofflee at Eugene as
second class matter.
Subscription rates, per year, J1.00.
Single copies. Re
STAFF
Editor-in-Chief.Karl W. Onthank
Assistant Editor.... Carleton K. Spencer
Managing Editor.Franklin S. Allan
■•vs Editor,. . . .Henry Fowler
Olty Editor. Harold Young
Spaolal Departments
Administration . Clarence Brotnertos
Assistant .larnes Donald
Co-Ed. Sporting Editor, Nellie Hamenway
Society Editor.Elizabeth Lewie
Assistant .May Kmith
Literary and Dramatic... A. H. Davies
Ezchance Editor.Graham McConnell
Daw Sohool.K. Barns Powell
Newe Editor's Staff.
Earl Bl&ckaby Fred Dunbar
Tula Kingsley Robert Farlss
City Editor’s Staff
Evelvri Harding
Beatrice TJlly.
Clarence Ash
Roger Moe
Janet Young
Beatrice Locke
Thomas Boylen
Harry Cash
Wallace Eakln
I.uton Ackereon
Elmer Furusett
Arthur Crawford
Business Mgr.Andrew M Collier
Assistant Manager.Lymau G. Hies
Collection Manager.Sam Michael
Assistants .Glen Wheeler
.J. Prentls Brown
Advertising Manager... Clyde Altchleon
Assistants.Roy T. Stephens
.Allen W. O'Connell
Circulation Manager.Sam Michael
Assistants.Kenneth Robinson
.Frank Dudley
Saturday, February 22, 1913.
THE PROBLEM OF OREGON
SPIRIT SOLVED AT LAST
The Committee on Constitutional
Revision is at last ready to report,
and our antiquated instrument of
student government bids fair to be
come the practical, useful, workable
document that it should be. The
larger part of the proposed amend
ments are of minor importance;
merely the clearing away of useless
and obsolete phrases and provisions.
The change most worthy of note and
of greatest value to the University
is the amendment changing ,the stu
dent fee from live to eight dollars,
thus enabling each student to receive
at the time of registration and with
out extra cost u season ticket admit
ting him to all inter-collegiate con
tests held upon the campus during the
year.
At present the .student pays ms
five dollars and receives nothing in
return. Then, in order to attend the
events of the year, he is forced to
pay out, a little at a time, from
twelve to fifteen dollars for admis
sion. As a matter of fact a non
student is permitted to enjoy the
varsity games at a less cost than u
student is permitted, for he has only
admission to puy, while the student
pays that and also a Student llody
an outsider. It will give to the stu
dents maintain these things and if
any are to receive extra privileges
they should be the ones. The pro
posed amendment will make the total
cost to a student less than that to
an outsider. It will give to hte stu
dent for three dollars what he now
pays twelve for.
The measure will tend to equalize
the burden of keeping up our ath
letic and other activities. As it is
men contribute by far the greater
proportion; the very nature of things
makes it inevitable. On the average
the women here at Oregon are the
more fortunate financially. Women
will not undertake to come to college
unless they have the n>**ans to do so
comfortably. The chance of getting
through under other conditions is too
small. On the other hand, a remark
ably large number of the men are
trusting to their ability to struggle
through by their own efforts. It is
no more than just that each student,
man or woman, should bear an equal
share of Student Tlody expenses.
The most vital reason for adopting
this amendment is the revival of Ore
gon Spirit whieh it will undoubtedly
bring about. With every student j
having free access to all games, the
attendance will more than double.
Practically every 't alent will attend
and this will insurt a great increase
of enthusiasm and patriotism. Peo
ple absolutely cannot become enthus
iastic over things they d not see
We can shout and orate about the
lack of University Spirit until
Doomsday, hut we cannot make a
crowd of peoph wl.o never attend,
see any reason for supporting loy
ally the men who are t ntering the
contest for the sake of Old Oregon.
The fee thus increased will still he
lighter than that of most Dniversi
ties. In its study of the constitu
tions of various schools, the commit
tee has discovered that the usun/l
fee where free admission to games is
granted, is ten dollars. Careful fig
uring, however, has led it to be
lieve that eight dollars, with the pres
ent efficient method of managing, will
enable Oregon to steer clear of
financial difficulties.
The committee deserves commenda
tion for the thorough and conscienti
ous work it has done in solving
the problem of the A. S. U. O. con
stitution. Its recommendation re
garding the increased fee, especially,
should receive the unanimous support
of every student.
Announcements
Sophomore meeting — Important
meeting of the Sophomore class will
be held Monday afternoon in Dr.
Schmidt’s room in Deady Hall. Dele
gates and treasurer to elect.
—
Freshman meeting—A special meet
ing of the Freshman class will be
held Tuesday afternoon, at 3 o’clock,
in Villard Hall, to elect delegates to
the oratorical contest.
Eutaxians—Regular meeting Tues
day evening, in Library building.
Laureans—Election of officers at
regular meeting Tuesday evening.
Student Body meeting—Regular
meeting Wednesday morning. Elec
tion of editor of Emerald. Amend
ments to constitution will be brought
up for consideration.
Y. W. C. A.—Regular meeting
Monday afternoon a the Shack.
Lost—A cravenette, considerably
worn, with name of owner, H. Young,
printed on collar band. Reward to
finder.
Lincoln High Alumni—Will meet
next Tuesday evening, at 7:30, at
Kappa Alpha Theta house.
Dramatic Club—Will meet Tuesday
evening, February 25, at 7:30, in Pro
fessor Straub’s room. Important
business.
Basketball—University of Wash
ington vs. University of Oregon, Fri
day and Saturday evening, at 8
o’clock. Tickets on sale tomorrow
morning, at 10 o’clock, at the Book
Exchange.
Choral Club—Practice will be held
hereafter every Monday, Tuesday and
Wednesday afternoon, at 4 o’clock, in
Villard Hall.
Oregana photo—Must be taken be
fore February 26.
Found—Fountain pen. E. W. Al
len.
Dramatic Club—Regular business
meeting culled for Tuesday evening,
February 25, at 7 o’clock, in Profes
sor Straub’s room, Villard Hall.
Co-ed debaters—All women intend
ing to enter the debate try-outs to
compete against Washington, are re- j
quested to hand their names to Pro-1
fessor Prescott at once.
---« ♦ --
Mohawk Lumber Co. for first class i
lumber and shingles.
Students eat at the Y. M. C. A. j
Cafeteria.
Y. M. C. A. Cafeteria for good
eats.
Weber’s candy at Obak’s.
011 0000000000
o HELP WANTED o
o o
o Insertions Free. o i
o 000 OO 000000
Student to wash dishes and do odd
jobs around the house, for board and
room. Y. M. C. A. Bureau.
Business Men The Association's
Bureau has several men in need of
regular work for several hours dur
ing the week. This student help
gives satisfaction.
Students Students needing and
desiring to do odd jobs, should see
the general secretary of the Associa
tion in the Book Exchange and leave
schedule of the working hours.
Wanted Student to do work
around house on Friday mornings.
Association Bureau.
ooooooooooooo
0 SOCIETY o
I O - 0
j o By Bess Lewis. o
ioooooooooooo
“Tis Spring again and in my soul
1 feel that living joy. That’s sure to
come about once a year to every girl
and boy.” Spring is indeed here and
with it the mill race fever and golf
itis are prevalent upon the campus.
The decorations of all the dances
and receptions are decidedly Spring
like in character.
Delta Delta Delta entertained Fri
day with a tea for the town and fac
ulty ladies. The house was beauti
fully decorated with a profusion of
Oregon grape nad hyacinths. Mrs.
Frederick Dunn and Mrs. J. H. Gil
bert presided at the tea and choco
late urns in the dining room. In
the receiving line were Miss Pearl
Horner, Miss Pearl Bonisteel, Mrs. A.
R. Sweetser, and Mrs. William Kuy
kendall.
George Frazier, ex-’15, was married
in Portland, Wednesday evening, to
Miss Emma Bayer, of Portland. Af
ter a short wedding tour, Mr. and
Mrs. Frazier will make their home
in Laurelhurst, a suburb of Port
land.
Homer Jamison, ’12, is spending a
few days at the Sigma Chi house. He
is acting as referee for the Oregon
Washington basketball games.
Miss Lila Sengstake, Mrs. C. R.
Fenton, and Miss Dorothy Bliss, all
of Portland, are guests of the Kappa
Alpha Theta house this week.
Doctor and Mrs. James H. Gilbert
and Professor H. W. Koehler were
dinner guests at the Kappa Alpha
Theta house Thursday.
Mrs. T. A. Ball, of Astoria, is
spending a few days at the Delta
Delta Delta house visiting her daugh
ter.
Miss Ronisteel will entertain the
Delta Delta Delta, girls with a Wash
ington birthday dinner party.
The Lambda Rhu Sophomores will
entertain Saturday evening with a
Japanese festival.
Phi Delta Theta held initiation
Thursday evening for Ira Staggs.
DEBATERS ARE SHIFTED
Date for Utah Contest Deferred—
Motschenhacher and Zimmerman
Change Sides.
The Oregon-Utah debate will prob
ably be held after the triangular de
bate with Stanford and Washington,
according to a telegram received
from Utah this morning by Debate
Coach Robert Prescott. Utah claims
that it will be impossible for hew to
be prepared within the short time
before the debate. As a result of
this news, Howard Zimmerman, who
was to have made the Utah trip with
Pickett, will switch over to the neg
ative side and make the Stanford
trip with King, while Motschenhacher
and Pickett will take the affirmative
and debate both Utah and Washing
ton.
STl DENT BODY TO
AMEND CONSTITUTION
(Continued from First Page.)
to eight dollars and that every stu
dent receive upon payment of these
dues a free Student Body ticket; the
other limiting the number of sweaters
that an athlete may receive to one a .
year, but giving a blanket to anyone
who wins his letter in one of the ma
jor sports four consecutive years.
“The changes contemplated further
provide among other things, that any
elective officer of the Student Body
may be recalled at any time by 25
per cent of the students; that the
books of the Student Body treasurer
be exported annually and that the
Women's Choral be made a Univer
sity activity upon the same basis as
the (llee Club.
None of the changes are recom
mended to become operative until
next fall.
V. W. C. A. Cabinet A meeting
of the Y. W. C. A. Cabinet will be
held Tuesday afternoon, at 8 1\ M.
OREGON FRESHMAN
BECOMES EXPLORER
Summerlin Will Assist in Alaskan
Survey, Through County Un
known to Whites.
Lester Summerlin, T6, left Port
land Friday night for Seattle, where
he will take the boat for Alaska
about the first of the month to assist
in completing the survey of the
boundary between Alaska and Can
. ada. The party of which he is a
member, will leave the boat at Cor
dova and make their way on foot over
! the rough country to the southern
portion of the boundary yet to be
surveyed.
This is the third season which
Summerlin, has spent in this work,
having assisted in running the line
as far north as the Arctic slope,
where he experienced several days
with twenty-four hours of daylight.
The country over which they are to
run the line this year, has never, as
far as anyone knows, been crossed by
white men.
The party will continue their work
during the summer, returning in
September, at which time Summerlin
will again enter school.
WHAT THE ALBANY HERALD
THINKS OF THE EMERALD
“The Oregon Emerald, the official
thrice a week newspaper that is is
sue by the students of the Univer
sity of Oregon at Eugene is one of
the livest of the papers that come to
the exchange desk, each department
''seeming to be in the best of hands
and well maintained. The front page
of the last issue bears a cartoon of
J. E. Murphy, of the Oregon Journal-,
who has consented to draw cartoons
for the Emerald.
The issue also contains a number
of fine halftone newspaper cuts and a
goodly amount of live reading matter.
Its pages are quite liberally patron
ized by the merchants of Eugene with
modern advertising, which shows that
the publication is appreciated in its
home town as well as outside.”—Al
bany Herald.
EUTAXIANS TO DISCUSS
LEGISLATIVE PROGRAM
A discussion of the State legisla
tive program by Eleanor McClain,
Hazel Tooze, and Lyle Steiwer, will
form the chief feature of the regular
Eutaxian meeting to be held Tuesday
evening in Dr. Schafer’s room in the
Library. Details of the last session’s
work of our legislature will be re
viewed and an insight in to the word
ings of the state’s legislative body
will be given. In addition to the
program Eleanor McClain, chairman
of the program committee, will briefly
ootline the nature of the programs to
be given the coming semester by the
society.
“ALL’S WELL ON OREO ANA,”
SAYS EDITOR DON RICE
Work on the Oregana is progress
ing in good shape, according to Edi
tor Don Rice. The two borders to
appear on the margin of the pages
have been sent east to the engravers.
Manager Hawley Bean is in Portland
working up the advertising. All the
administration and classes’ material
has been handed in, and the Law
and Medical departments will be com
pleted next week. At present there
are four contributors working upon
the features.
SENIOR MANAGER TO CONFER
WITH DIRECTOR BERNARD
Earnest l-amb left last night for
Portland, where he will make final
arrangements with William Bernard
for rehearsals of the Senior play,
“A Strenuous Life,” which is to be
presented at the Eugene Theatre on
April 5. Mr. Bernard is stage direc
tor of the Baker Stock Company of
Portland, and was recently selected
to coach and direct the Senior pro
duction.
There is a bill before the Wieon
sin legislature, prohibiting the sale
of liqour within a mile radius of the
University of Wisconsin.
Preston & Hales
Mfgrs. of all Leather Goods
DeaUra in
PAINTS AND PAPER
Agts. Johnson’s Dyes and Wax
A. W. COOK
CLEANING, PRESSING AND
REPAIRING
LADIES WORK A SPECIALTY
41 E. 7th St Ph«M (>t. luftna Or*
---.®
L. C. SMITH & BROS. TYPEWRITER
COMPANY
UNDERWOOD AND VISIBLE
REMINGTON TYPEWRITERS
REDUCED IN PRICE
We have on hand a few 1911
models of the machines of above
make, which we can sell for
$65.00 under our regular guar
antee of one year, on easy pay
ments, if preferred.
The price of these machines is $65.00.
What more suitable or appro
priate Christmas or New Year’s
gift could be presented to your
son or daughter? It would be
worth many times its cost for
their future education and profit.
We only have a limited num
ber of these machines on hand,
at this price, and it will be nec
essary to take advantage of this
offer at once.
L. C. SMITH & BROS. TYPEWRITER
COMPANY
280 Oak Street, Portland, Oregon.
COCKERLINE, ft FRALEY
Fancy and Staple Dry Goods, La
dies’ and Men’s Furnishings, Men’s
Youth’s, Children’s Clothing.
Phone orders filled promptly
Wing's Market
THE HOME OF GOOD MEATS
AND GROCERIES. FRESH
CURED, CORNED AND SMOK
ED MEATS, SAUSAGES AND
POULTRY
Phone M
487 Willamette
Dover’s Dancing School
Tuesdays, 7:30 to 9 P. M.
Saturday, 2::3:0 to 5 P. M.
West Seventh Street.
DR. M. C. HARRIS
Dentist
U. 0. ’98. Rooms t and 4, Me
Clung Bldg., 8th and Willamette Sts.
Dorris pfyoto Sfyop
Classy Photos
Cherry Bldg. Phone 741
Home Baking
Woman’s Exchange
86 E. 9th St. Phone 270-R
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Corner Tenth and Pearl Streets.
Morning Service—
Sabbath School, 9.45.
Church, 11:00. Sermon, “A Brief
for the Church.”
Evening Service-—
C, E„ 6:15.
Stereoptical Prelude, 7:15. Ser
mon. "The Abounding Life."
Look at the line of Reprints at
Cressey’s, they are tha best in the
Alumni Day, a home coming occa
sion for the graduates of Columbia
University, was observed at that in
stitution. Wednesday. February 12.
Hastings Sisters
HAIR DRESSING PARLORS
Register Building. Telephone 648-R
Manicuring Scalp and Face Treatment
Linn Drug Co.
I
KODAK SUPPLIES
Prescriptions Carefully Com
pounded
FANCY GROCERIES
FRUITS, VEGETABLES
Phone ue four orders. We here
our own delivery wagons. Phone 246
FURNITURE AND CARPETS
Seventh and Willamette Streets.
The Kuykendall
Drug Store
DRUGS, CANDIES, TOILET
ARTICLES AND SUNDRIES
688 Willamette St.
C. B. MARKS, M. D. -
EYE, EAR, NOSE AND THROAT
Glasses Correctly Fitted. *
201 and 202 White Temple. T
Phone 243-J.
“BLUE BELL”
ICE CREAM
THE REAL THING
%
Real, because it is made from real,
genuine, sure enough cream—the kind *
we always have plenty of.
Eugene Creamery
Phone 6S8.
We have all the best of
STAPLE AND FANCY
GROCERIES
At Reasonable Prices
G. E. METCALF, 583 Willamette *
Koehler & Steele
Millinery and
Needlecraft
Moved to F. E. Dunn & Co.
569 Willamette
EUGENE QUICK
Shoe Repair
Serviceable Repairing
M. MILLER 22 West Eighth