Oregon emerald. (Eugene, Or.) 1909-1920, February 20, 1913, Image 1

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    WOMEN'S COUNCIL
Tomorrow afternoon Mrs. E.
W. Allen speaks on '’Wo
men's Self Govt.”
OREGON
BASKETBALL
lT. of W. vs. Oregon, Friday
and Saturday evening.
Men’s Gym.
PUBLISHED THREE TIMES A WEEK
UNIVERSITY OF OREGON. EUGENE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 20- 1913.
Vol. XIV; No. 58
REBEC SHOWS GROWTH
OF EXTENSION WOO
EMPLOYEES OF PORTLAND RAIL
WAYS TAKE COURSES IN
UNIVERSITY
WORK.
LECTURES ARE IMPORTANT
Five Oregon Professors Make Dates
to Speak Before Portland
Organizations.
Dr. George Rebec, extension lec
turer and organizer, was at the Uni
versity Sunday and Monday, and out
lined the growth of the work through
out the State. The extension is rap
idly gaining favor and encouragement.
The Harriman and Hill lines in Ore
gon have both offered free transpor
tation for the University instructors
in Extension, and any members of the
Faculty engaged in the same work.
For some time there have been
three extension classes among the
employees, both official and clerical,
of the Portland Railway, Light and
Power Company. Friday of last week
three classes were started among the
employees of the Harriman lines; and
yesterday classes were organized for
the employees of the Hill lines. The
Hill Company gave all the men one
half hour from working hours to hear
Dr. Rebec explain the work. English
was the favorite subject of the classes
in the last two companies.
Preliminary steps have also been
taken for the organization of several
private groups among the young busi
ness men of Portland.
Dr. Schafer in Portland.
Individual lecture courses are play
ing an important part in the extension
work. Dr. Joseph Schafer, of the his
tory department, is just concluding
a series of lectures on Northwest his
tory before the Irvington Club of
Portland, and before a group of ex
tension students in Salem. On Satur
day of this week Dr. Schafer will be
gin the same series of lectures before
the Portland Heights Club of Port
land. His success in the first in
stance led to the continuance of his
work in another field.
Last Friday Dr. E. S. Conklin, in
structor in psychology, started a
cou' se of lectures before the Portland
Y. M. C. A., on Mental Hygiene. He
also addresses the business men at
noon on Saturday. Dr. Conklin will
lecture there tomorrow and Saturday,
and for a few weeks following.
Reddie to Give Readings.
Professor A. F. Reddie, of the pub
lic speaking department, is to give a
reading of the “Tale of Two Cities,’’
at St. Helens, Ore., tomorrow evening.
He will give the same reading before
the Portland Y. M. C. A. on Satur
day evening. Professor Reddie will
give other readings at the Portland Y.
M. C. A. at future dates. The plan of
the Y. M. C. A. is to have these read
continued on last page.)
TRIPLE-"#" GIRLS WILL ASCEND
SKINNER'S BUTTE, RAIN OR SHINE
, Hike Will be Strictly Informal—
Thirty Freshman Woman to
Take Trip.
Rain or shine, the Triple “A” So
ciety of Freshmen girls will assemble
in the East Park, corner of Eighth and
Oak streets, next Saturday afternoon,
at 1:30 o’clock, for their first moun
j tain climbing expedition, or informal
I hike.
About twenty-five or thirty Fresh
men are expected by President Bai
ley to make this initial trip. The
women will climb Skinner’s Butte,
just north of the Southern Pacific de
pot, ascending the hill by easy
stages. The return will be made af
ter a short rest on the summit.
The committee in charge of this
hike consists of Gladys Graybill,
Georgia Kinsley, and Helen Robinson.
It is the intention of the society to
go on these short trips every week.
All Freshmen women are invited.
The rifle team of the University of
West Virginia has defeated all the
contenders for the championship in
markmanship with the exception of
the University of Iowa.
M’GLURE TO ENTER IN
PACIFIC CLUB MEET
EXPENSES PAID BY OLYMPIC
CLUB
Inter-Class Cross Country Post
poned to Allow Track Captain
to Compete.
Captain Walter McClure left Eu
gene last night on the Shasta Lim
ited, bound for San Francisco, where
he will represent the University of
Oregon, Saturday, in the annual in
door meet of the Pacific Amateur
Athletic Club, held under the auspices
of the Olympic Club of that city.
McClure had decided not to enter
the meet until yesterday, when he re
ceived a message from Peter Gear
hart, urging him to be present to run
against Vlught, of St. Mary’s College,
who is announced as the probable
winner of the 3,000 meter run. Mc
Clure’s expenses on the southern trip
are paid by the Olympic Club.
The annual inter-class cross coun
try run, which was scheduled for Sa
turday, February 2£, will be post
poned until the following Friday, be
cause of McClure’s departure. It is
the desire of Hayward to have Mc
Clure and Windnagle run again over
the three mile course. Although
Windnagle succeeded in crossing the
tape before McClure in the former
race, it is doubted whether he will be
able to repeat the feat in next Fri
day’s race.
The University of Michigan has
won 28 debates out of 40, that have
been held the last twenty years with
the University of Chicago and North
western University.
SENIOR DANGERS WILL GET PARTNERS BT LOT.
SPENCER AND PICKET TO ATTEND ORATORICALS
A lottery dance in which partners
are chosen by chance is an innovation
to be given by the Senior class at the
first available date within the next
month. There is to be no worrying
on the part of the women whether or
not they will receive “bids”; there
will be none of that embarrasing un
certainty among the men as "Who is
it safe to ask?” Everyone goes; and
he takes whom he is told to take.
Partners are drawn by lot. A com
mittee has details in charge.
At the meeting of the class held
yesterday afternoon, Dave Pickett
and Carlton Spencer were selected
class representatives to the State
Inter-collegiate Contest. These men
are the only holders of medals from
this annual contest, in college.
Pickett won his medal last year,
while Spencer won the state medal
the year before. Howard Zimmerman
will represent Oregon this year.
President Bailey appointed as mem
bers of the committee to select and
arrange for the Senior memorial, |
Karl Martzloff. Vernon Vawter, nad
Elizabeth Busch.
(LEE CLUB DEFICIT
AMOUNTS ID (15.26
EMBLEMS FOR SINGERS, HOW
EVER. WILL CAUSE
SHORTAGE OF
$60 MORE
IS BEST SEASON SINCE 1909
Club Made Good in Eastern Tour,
Says Geary, But Fell Short in
Eugene.
The financial report of the Glee
Club for the season 1912-13 as sub
mitted by Manager Arthur M. Geary
shows receipts to be $1,117.15 and ex
penditures $1,133.41, making a deficit
of $15.26. There is a disputed bill of
about $15 which has not yet been set
j tied and also the emblems for the
| club members, amounting to about
! $60, which are yet to be settled.
For the season of 1907-8 there was
| a deficit of $478.36; 1908-9, a deficit
I of $436.70; 1909-10, a surplus of
I $177.63; 1910-11, a deficit of $254.04;
11911-12 a deficit of $234. Hence the
: season just passed is the best one on
record, in that no appropriation has
i been received from the Student Body
as in former years, with the excep
tion of the 1909-10 season. The main
item of expense outside of traveling
was $400 salary for Director Bow
man. Oregon is the only institution
in the Northwest to pay a director
for Glee Club work.
Manager Geary states that the club
came out ahead on the Eastern Ore
(Continued on last page.)
INFLUENCE OF 0RE60N
GRADUATES IS. FELT
GRADUATES OF UNIVERSITY IN
LEGISLATURE MIX IN
AFFAIRES OF
STATE
UTOURETTE GAINS APPLAUSE
(Jives Credit for Parliamentary Suc
cess to the Training from
Laurean Society.
The Oregon Grads have not only
made good by securing seats in the
two houses of the State Legislature
as representatives of the people but are
keeping up their records by taking
active parts in a number of recent
oratorical and parliamentary contests,
which have arisen over various bills
put before the Legislature at its
present session.
“Pat” McArthur, from Multnomah
county and speaker of the House of
Representatives, heads the list.
“Pat’s” word in the House is consid
ered as law. Dan Malarkey, who is
in the Senate, is a graduate of the
University’s Law School, and is mak
ing his mark.
Latourette Wins Applause.
Jack Latourette, representative
from Multnomah county, who was
one of Oregon’s famous football quar
teis, is chairman of the Judiciary
Board and author of a bill which
abolishes the county courts in the
(Continued on last page.)
CONTRACT SIGNED FOR
CHORALCLUBCONCERT
Theatre Grants Women Liberal
Terms—Ogden Quiet as to
Program.
Manager Arthur M. Geary and Mel
vin Ogden, for the Student Body and
the Choral Club, and George H.
Smith, for the Eugene Theatre, have
affixed their signatures to a contract
calling for the production of the
Choral Club concert, March 14, in the
Eugene Theatre.
The terms granted by Manager
Smith to the women’s organization
were liberal, 75 per cent of the pro
ceeds going to the club, while out of
the theatre’s shart of 25 per cent,
Manager Smith agrees to pay the ad
vertising expenses and provide the
or chestra. This should leave a con
siderable margin for the Choral Club,
for the seat prices have been fixed at
50c, 75c, and $1.00. The seat sale will
open several days before the produc
tion, and the management intends to
use every possible means to push the
sale.
Director Melvin Ogden arrived in
Eugene this noon on the Oregon
Electric, and will remain in Eugene
the remainder of this week. “No, I
am not prepared to divulge any of the
details of the program that the girls
will put on,” he replied to a ques
tion, “but I must say that they are
doing dandy work, and deserve credit
and praise for the manner in which
they are taking hold of this long de
ferred performance.”
Several other new members will be
added to the club membership, prob
ably tomorrow or Saturday. Miss
Florence Avery, president of the club,
has been conducting the reahersals
during the absence of Mr. Ogden.
The javelin has been eliminated
from the list of track events sanc
tioned by the Missouri Valley Confer
ence of Colleges.
Eugene W. Chafin is scheduled for
a series of lectures at the University
of Wisconsin.
ASSOCIATIONS PLAN
JOINT CABINET PARTY
Y. M. C. A. Emerald Breaks Prece
dent by Not Losing Money This
Year—Annual Election Planned.
“The annual Y. M. C. A. cabinet
party, which will be given March 5,
will be a joint affair with the Y. W.
C. A. cabinet,” said Secretary Chas.
Koyl yesterday. “Last year the ex
penses of this party were paid by the
Association, but this year each mem
ber of the cabinet will have to pay
his own share of the expense.”
The report of Alfred Collier shows
that the recent edition of the Y. M.
C. A. Emerald broke exactly even
financially. Last year there was a
defiieit of $40.
The election of officers takes place
next month, March I*. President Cash
will appoint a nominating committee
to name the officers of the Association
for the ensuing year, beginning the
last of March. March Iff, the report
of the nominating committee will be
given in the regular meeting of the
Association, and on March 20, the an
nual association election will be held.
The annual association banquet and
installation of new officers and an
nouncement of department heads will
be given at the City Y. M. C. A.
building.
Whitman College has received an
endowment of $125,000 from the
Rockefeller Organization of New York
City, provided the institution raises
$375,000 by June 30, 1014. Commit
tees are already at work to secure the
$375,000.
Princeton University students will
be apart of President-elect Woodrow
Wilson’s escort on March 4th. There
will be one thousand students taking 1
part in the parade. Gov. Wilson has )
approved of the plan.
Drake Medical School will be1
merged at the end of this school year j
with the State University of Iowa.
HIGH SCHOOL TEACHERS REQUEST
INSTRUCTION IK NEWS WRITING
Professor Allen Meets Pedagoges for
First Time Last Evening—Editors
Study by Mail.
The journalism bug has invaded
the Eugene High School, with the re
sult that Professor E. W. Allen, pro
fessor of journalism in the University,
met several members of the faculty of
that institution last evening in his
office;—the first of a series of meet
ings for the teaching of the general
principles of news writing.
The class was formed at the request
j of those present at the first meeting,
including Professor and Mrs. George
Hug, Miss Norma Hendricks, Miss
Susan Dinsmore, Miss Hattie Hyde,
Mrs. Thurston, and Mr, Ray Fisher.
The class will meet regularly here
after, every Wednesday evening. It
is probable that certain principles ex
plained will be incorporated in the
High School English course.
At the present time there are four
or five newspaper editors of the State
enrolled in the journalism correspond
I once department, studying by mail
; how to run their papers, while one
| women in Eastern Oregon is taking a
course in proof reading by mail.
HOT GAMESIXPECTED
WITH U.OFW. QUINTET
TWO VARSITY FIVES MEET FRI
DAY ANI) SATURDAY
i Fenton Out of Game—Washington
Team Compost'd of Young
Hasket Shooters.
000000000000
o o
o Standing of the Conference o
o Teams.
o
Won. Lost. Pet.
W. S. C.
Washington
Oregon .
O. A. C.
Idaho
0
2
5
5
14
1.000
.800
.375
.375
.125
ooo
ooooo
Friday and Saturday nights of this
week the varsity five will meet the
University of Washington basketball
team in Hayward Hall, in what prom
ise to be two of the most hotly con
tested basketball games played in the
Northwest this year. The Washing
ton players come with a string of
eight victories and but two defeats
thus far this season and have expec
tations of repeating the 25 to 10 score
made against Oregon in Seattle. Al
though Fenton will be out of the game
on account of injuries to his back,
Coach Hayward and Captain Sims feel
confident that with the last few days
of practice, the varsity team-work has
been greatly improved, and expect to
walk away with the long end of the
scores, Friday and Saturday.
Bradshaw or Walker will be used
(Continued on last page.)
OREGON IS BEAUTIFUL
BUT STILL BARBARIC
SAMI EL HILL COMPARES EURO
PEAN HIGHWAYS WITH
IMPASSABLE ROADS
ON COAST
0. TO TRAIN MAKERS
Speaker Praises Quality of English
Spoken in Oregon—Champions
Eoual Suffrage.
"No country in all the world ranks
with your own Oregon in natural
beauty; and there is yet no country
more barbarous. Especially is this
true in the great problem of the day,
i in highway development,” said Sam
uel Hill yesterday morning to the
largest audience that has greeted an
Assembly speaker this year.
European Roads Are Model.
And one hundred and fifty pictures
flashed upon screen on Villard plat
form proved his assertions to the
satisfaction of his listeners. The
splendid highways of England,
France, and Germany, were shown in
contrast with our own almost im
passible roads, where it takes a horse
to pull the same load that a dog will
haul easily on European highways.
There were pictures shown from our
own state; where rugged, muddy
roads have been converted into beau
tiful macadam highways with easy
slopes, and safe bridges—marvels of
expert construction. This has been
done by convict labor. The state has
by the cheapest possible means facil
itated traffic by highways that will
endure for hundreds of years. Then
came scenes of our natural beauties;
rivers, mountains, lakes, forests, falls,
cliffs, and flowers; all so perfectly
colored as to bring out every line,
shadow and color. Mountains, falls,
and trees were shown in the varying
lights of morning, noon, and evening.
These pictures were mostly taken by
Mr. A. II. Barnes, who has made
Oregon photography his life work.
He sometimes waited weeks to gain
the right effect of light. “Do you
like them?” asked Mr. Hill. “All
these beauties could be made access
ible to all through the construction of
proper highways.”
Tariff Relatively Unimportant.
“Road building is the greatest pro
blem of the day; not tariff. This
question is five times as important as
the tariff controversy. Let’s quit
bothering about these obsolete sub
jects and get down to something that
vitally concerns us,” said Mr. Hill.
We must make it possible for the
farmer to haul his produce cheaply,
for he is the great food producer;
and facilitating his work means ad
vantage to all. Concentration on the
cities invariably means decay, f«V*
that is not the essential part of our
development. Do you know that nine
(Continued on last page.)
JOURNALIST’S JOKE ON HOST YEAR CLASS
RESULTS IN UNEXPECTED DEVELOPMENTS
A class room experiment in news
paper psychology, which worked al
most too well, nearly resulted in the
mill-racing: of a Freshman and a
Sophomore, created an uproar in the
department of journalism for an
hours and finally aroused the police
and newspaper men of two cities, in
an effort to locate a trumped up auto
mobile theft. Professor Allen, of the
department of Journalism, to test the
accuracy of his student journalists at
reporting; facts, laid the plans for the
episode, using Clarence Ash and Max
Sommer as confederates.
Just after the Freshman journal
ism class assembled yesterday after
noon, Ash rushed into the room
breathless, and whispered in the ear
of Sommer. The latter sprang to his
feet, shot a frightened glance about
the astonished class room, jumped
through an open window, and dashed
pell-mell across the campus out of
sight.
Shortly after order was resumed
in the class room the phone rang.
Ash was called for. The professor
appeared provoked.
“Tell your friend not to call you
during recitation hour,” he admoh
(Continued on last page.)