Oregon emerald. (Eugene, Or.) 1909-1920, January 11, 1913, Image 1

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    VOL XIV.
UNIVERSITY OF OREGON. EUGENE. SATl R1)VY. JANUARY 11. 1913.
No. 14
KAPPA KAPPA GAMMA
INSTALLS LOCAL AS
BETA OMEGA CHAPTER
GAMMA DELTA GAMMA RE
CEIVES CHARTER IN NATION
AL AFTER WAIT OF
FOUR YEARS
TEN ALUMNI INSTALLED
These in Turn Will Initiate Active
Members of Local—Many Out
of-Town Guests Attend.
The installation of the Beta Omega
Chapter of Kappa Kappa Gamma in
charge of Miss Eva Powell, Grand
President from Berkeley, started this
afternoon at 2 p. m., and will con
tinue until tomorrow, ending with a
banquet at the Osborn Hotel for the
new chapter and the out-of-town
guests.
Kappa Kappa Gamma was found
ed at Monmouth, Illinois. October 19,
1870,—is the second oldest women’s
organization in existence, and is the
first in total membership. This is
the thirty-seventh active chapter of
the fraternity, and the fifth national
to be established at the University of
Oregon.
Gamma Delta Gamma, the local or
ganization, which is absorbed, was
founded in 1908. with twelve charter
members, and immediately petitioned
for this national. Ten of the original
members have returned to be ini
tiated as charter members of the Beta
Omega chapter, and they will in turn
initiate this afternoon the active
members of Gamma Delta Gamma.
The ten alumni that have returned
are Lilia Irwin, ’08, Loretta Showers,
’10, Carolyn Dunstan, ’10, Frances
Young, TO, Olive Donnell, ’ll, Clem
entine Cutler, ’12, Ruth Hardie, ’12.
Alice Larsen, T2, Neta Bartlett, ’12,
Hazel Wightman, ’12. Those of the
local chapter to be initiated are Mrs.
Kred Kerr, ’09, Eva Roach, ’13, Gla
dys Cartwright, 13, Carin Degermark,
’13, Helen Holbrook, ’13, Marguerite
Rohse, ’13, Lucile Abrams, ’13, Flor
ence Avery, T4, Olga Poulsen, T4,
Genevieve Cooper, ’15.
Mrs. George Gerlinger, formerly of
the Berkley chapter, but now of The
Dalles, is here, also nine members of
the Beta Pi chapter of the Univer
sity of Washington. They are Doris
Bi'onson, Louise Bronson, Leila Par
ker, Hazel Randolph, Lottie Tren
holme, Mrs. Reta Wild, Miss Eck
storm. Miss Miller, Miss Woodnutt.
The other out-of-town guests are Mrs.
Agnes Dunstan of Albany, Miss Nan
Stewart of Lebanon. Miss Alice Eg
bert of Corvallis, Miss Williams o’
Grants Pass. Mr. and Mrs. Pierce,
Mrs. Ingles, and Miss Williams of
Portland. The two members of Kap
pa Kappa Gamma living in Eugene,
(Continued on last paee.I
MISS FORBES TO PUT
Aided bv Miss Avi ■ Benton. Violin
Instructor Will Give Recital
January 15.
Wednesday evening.
Miss Winifred Forbes
Miss Avis Benton, will
in Yillard Hall. The pr
as follows:
Sonata .
Allegro Moderato.
Lullaby
Waltz
Concerto, G Minor
Adagio.
Allegro Moderato.
ngarian Poems—
No. 1 .
No. 6 .
Wi Iter’s Prize Song.
Rhapsodie No. 11
January 15,
, assisted by
give a recital
ogram will be
H
Sjoegren
I.achmunse
Lachmunse
Brurch
Hubav
Hubav
Wagner
. . Liszt
CANADIANS FAIL TO APPRECIATE
U. OF WASHINGTON GLEE CLUB
$4.50 House at Vancouver, R. C., Af
ter $1(10 Outlay, Causes Manager
to Cancel Dates.
UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON.
Jan. 10.—The University Glee Club
journeyed all the way to Vancouver,
B. C., and played before a $4.50 house
Monday. The cost of the trip was
$160 and as a result of the failure to
pay expenses on its initial tour, the
Glee Club may cancel all its engage
ments for concerts In neighboring ci
ties.
The student board of control op
posed financing a Glee Club trip, but
after a press agent trip by Manager
Earl Clifford, it was thought that any
trips that would be made would pay
expenses. An expensive tour was
then arranged for the club, and the
Vancouver date was the first one.
Managers of the club favor drop
ping Vancouver, B. C., from the list.
State Legislature is Discussed and
Woman’s Fitness for Political
Work Commended.
“The forty days allowed to the ses
sion of the State Legislature is en
tirely too short to take care of the
business that comes before it,” Sena
tor W. W Calkins of Eugene stated
in an address delivered to the mem
bers of the Agora Club Thursday
evening on “How Does the Legisla
ture Work?” Enlarging upon this
thought, Senator Calkins said also,
that the members of the lower house
change almost every year, and that
the new members are invariably inex
perienced in parliamentary procedure.
Far less time than is needed is al
lowed in the short session for new
members to become efficient members.
Mr. Calkins said further, that he had
no use for the Initiative or Referen
dum as methods of making law.
Mr. Calkins stated that he was
pleased with the aptness of .the col
lege women in asking questions. The
nature of their questions showing
that they were already well-versed
in the subject matter of his address.
The remaining lectures to be given
to the Agora Club this year are:
January 2”, “A Social Survey of an
Oregon City,” Mrs. Mable H. Par
sons; February 13, “The Minimum
Wage Movement,” Dr. James H. Gil
bert; February 27, “City Government
in Oregon,” Dr. Joseph Shafer;
March G, “The University and Its
Service to the Commonwealth,” Pro
fessor F. G. Young. On March 20,
Professor Sweetser will deliver an
address before the club on some
phase of Public Health. April 3,
“a'he University and the Political
Life of the State,” President Camp
bell. Two other meetings, at which
addresses will be delivered, will he
held on April 24 and May 1. The
subjects of these addresses will be on
some phase of Home Economics and
Child Welfare. The speakers for
these last lectures are not yet
chosen.
PROFESSOR SHAFER OFFERS
NEW HISTORY COURSE
Professor Joseph Shafer will offer
an electric course in history the sec
ond semester on “The American Re
volution—A Study in the Origin of
Modern Democracy.” The course will
be a three hour course, two recita
tions, and conference, each week.
Lick’ ’.- American Revolution,, edited
by Woodburn, and The Literary His
tory of the American Revolution by
M. C. Tyler.
1’ *7 -'"i- Shafer has asked that
those who desire to take the course
sec him at once.
T
FACULTY TO CONSIDER
A RADICAL REVISION
OF COLLEGE CALENDAR
DIVISION OF SCHOOL YEAR
INTO FOUR SEMESTERS
IS PRINCIPLE
REVISION
POSTED ATHLETES CONSIDERED
Will Advise Translation of Diploma
Into English-—Four Days (liven
for Inland Trip.
The most important matter to come
before the Faculty meeting Thursday
ev.ening in Villard Hall was the pro
posed revision of the college calendar.
To this end a committee of three will
he appointed next week by President
Campbell to take the matter under
advisement. Several changes have
been proposed, among them is one
which is in force at the University of
Chicago, by which the college year is
divided into four semesters, any
three of which the students may at
tend, and any one of which a member
of the faculty may take for a vaca
tion. It has also been proposed to
open and close the school year one
month earlier than at present, thus
making the summer vacation extend
from May 15 to August 15. The re
port of the committee will be consid
ered at the next meeting.
Two other committees will also be
appointed to consider the matter of
removing posted men from the teams,
and to take under advisement the pro
posed change in the diploma given at
graduation, translating its present
Latin phrases into English, in accord
ance with a similar movement in the
Eastern colleges. The Faculty grant
ed four days for the Inland Empire
trip, insted of three, as formerly. The
recent action of the Student Council,
making the Treasurer of the Associat
ed Students a member of the Student
Council, was also ratified. At the
next meeting, Dr. Joseph Shafer in
tends to introduce the motion that the
requirement of one year’s residence
before graduation be abolished.
HAYWARD MUST NOW
FILL SIMS’ POSITION
Captain Hurts Knee and Oregon's
Chances at Same Time—Pink
Griffith Wails.
(By Jimmie Roberts.)
The injury to Captain Sims during
Thursday night's practice has put
another crimp in the -Varsity’s chance
of trimming Idaho on next Monday
and Tuesday. Sims’ injured knee will
keep him out of both games and will
give Coach Hayward another big hole
to fill in the Oregon lineup. Boylen
or Briedwell will take the place of the
captain and Brooks will probably be
the choice to start the game at for
ward. The shift of Fenton to for
ward and Bradshap to center was
tiied out for the first time on Thurs
day night and showed the possibility
of a good combination to develope,
but it will be practically impossible
to use it against th" Gem Staters on
account of Sim’s injury, as Oregon
would have to use a green pair of
guards to break the Idaho offense.
Very little information concerning
the strength of th' laho team ha«
reached here this season. One wild
tale reached the campus a week or so
ago of how the Freshmen were trim
ming the Varsity five in the nightly
encounters and later Pink Griffith
came forth with the wail that his
team would be all freshmen and in
experienced at the inter-collegiate
Continued on page two.
PROFESSORS SEEK 10
UTILIZE SAWDUST AND
WASTE OF SAWMILLS
PROF. STAFFORD AND SH1NX
CONSTRUCTING RETORT IN
HOPES OF COMMF.RClAP
ING BY-PRODUCTS
IMPORTANT IF SUCCESSFUL
Would Create Enormous Industry in
Northwest. If Can He Made Com
mercially Profit able.
In the rear of the engineering build
ing'. under a temporary protection
from the rain, is a huge iron boiler,
upon which mechanics are drilling and
hammering. This is to be a large re
tort, constructed by the Chemistry de
partment. with which two University
professors hope to devise a method of
utilizing the wood waste from the
sawmills, lumber camps and factories
off the Northwest to a commercial ad
vantage. Professor O. F. Stafford, of
the department of chemistry, and Pro
fessor F. L. Shinn, have been walk
ing all fall upon this project. Al
ready the process has been worked
out and conducted on a small scale,
and the remaining work is to prove its
possibilities by an apparatus of com
mercial size.
The plan is to utilize sawdust, si ibs
and stumps and waste wood for the
manufacture of acetic acid, alcohol,
charcoal, tar, and a score of other
products of destructive distillation.
These can be easily produced on a
small scale, but as yet no process has
been invented which will handle the
enormous quantities of waste wood
from the sawmilling industry of the
Northwest to a commercial profit.
The cost of handling and the opera
tions seem to exceed the value of the
products.
Professor Stafford is reluctant to
talk about his plan until he knows
that it. is complete and a success, but
j he says: “We feel that we have found
: a slight variation in the process of
| destructive distillation, which will
fContinued on ■ )
BILL HANLEY SLATED
FOR NEXT ASSEMBLY
Disciple of Bryan Will Ask Mure
Thorough Irrigation Course
Front <). A. C.
William “Bill ' Hanley, the noted
land owner, rancher, and irrigation
booster from Burns, Oregon, and pro
totype of William Jennings Bryan,
will speak at Assembly next Wednes
! day morning, Mr, Hanley will be in
Eugene, with a number of his irriga
tion friends from the recent Irriga
tion Congress held irr Portland, on a
\ tour of inspection and a get-acquaint
id visit to the University of Oregon.
he subject of his address will be an
nounced later.
Immediately after the closing ses
sion of the Congress in Portland to
day, a number of the Eastern Oregon
representatives will .'-tart orr a junk
eting trip through the Willamette
Valley. After spending Monday at
Salem, to present the demands arrd
wishes of the irrigationists for leg
islation to the State Legislature, tin
party under the leadership of Mr.
\\ illiam Hanley, also a prominent
Democrat, who accompanied the
Western Governors recently on their
Eastern, trip on a special train, will
visit O. A. C. to request a more thor
egh course in irrigation at that in
stitution. From there they will go to
Eugene to inspect the University,
which most of the visitors have not
seen.
35 JOURNALISM STUDENTS STRUCK
WITH SUDDEN RELIGIOUS FERVOR
Must Attend Church Tomorrow, Pay
Attention to sermon, and Write
I'p Services.
Forty-five first year journalists
must go to church tomorrow; every
one must hear some sermon, and
what is more, must know what has
been said when he leaves. This is
the form of assignment the young
newspaper writers received yester
day. The members of the class must
take notes of the sermon which they
hear, and write a “story" to be turned
in Monday. From these accounts will
be selected a representative one of
each church service and offered to one
of the local papers.
The students are in doubt as to the
propriety of writing their “story” on
Sunday, some declaring that, to be
consistant, they should wait until the
following morning to perform jour
nalistic labors.
GETS ALUM MEDAL
Dal Kell King, David Pickett, and
Vernon Motschenbachor also make
Debating Team.
In the final of three debate try-1
outs at the University, held last night
j >n Villard Hall to select the Varsity
debating team to go against Utah,
| Stanford, and Washington, the fol
lowing named contestants made
places; Howard Zimmerman, a Sen
ior from Salem; Vernon Motschen
bacher, a Junior from Klamath Falls;
David Pickett, a Senior from Prine
ville; and Dal/.ell King, a Junior from
Myrtle Point. Herbert W. Lombard,
of Eugene, Otto Dealer, of Sheridan,
were the other contestants for places.
Howard Zimmerman was awarded
the Alumni Medal for the best indi
vidual debater in the University.
The judges for the try-outs last
night were Dr. Gilbert, Professor
Ayer, and Mr. Prescott.
GERMAN CLUB TO MEET
AT TRI DELTA HOUSE
The next German Club meeting will
he held at the Tri Delta House, Tues
day, January 14, at 8 o’clock. The
program will be on “Social Life in
Germany,” including the following
numbers:
L Does the German College Stu
dent Have Any Sports, as Football,
Baseball, etc. Homer Maris.
2. Recitation Beulah Stebno.
3. Winter Sports in Germany
Ruth McCIuren.
L Does the German Youth Have
Much Social Life? Howard Zimmer
man.
5. Home Life of the Germans
Georgia Prather.
<T German Poem Pearl Horner.
7. Social Life of the Peasant
Ethic Rhodes.
Student Papers Leagued in Advertis
ing Union.
An association of the college agri
' cultural papers of the corn belt for
the purpose of promoting better rela
tions with adverti; ers, was formed at
a meeting of student representatives
of the Universities of Wisconsin,
Towa, Illinois, and Missouri, during
the recent International Livestock
Exposition at Madison, Wis. N. M.
Goe, business manager of the Wiscon
sin County Magazine, wa; elected
secretary-treasurer of the league. Be
sides the universities already repre
sented, the papers from the Purdue
Oregon, Penn State, Ohio State, and
Cornell agricultural colleges are ex
pected to enter into the alliance
These nine publications have a com
bined circulation of 30,000.
Go to the Y. M. C. A. Cafeteria for
good things to eat.
NEW SET OF ROLES
FOR WOMEN GO INTO
EFFECT IMMEDIATELY
FORM KR REGULATIONS RE
VIVED. WITH ADDITIONS,
FORM CODE APPROVED
BY FACULTY
NOT HARSH SAYS DEAN GUPPY
Regulations Made Ratlu-r As Help
Than Hindrance. She Affirms—
('o-eds Agree.
The revised regulations for the
women of the University received ap
proval at the Faculty meeting Thurs
day evening, and will go into effect
immediately. ‘These regulations are
Professor Luella Clay Carson’s old
rules with such changes and additions
as the growth of the University de
mom!.;,” said Miss Ruth Guppy, Dean
of Women, this afternoon. “They
are not intended in anyway as a crit
icism of conditions here or because
the young women are in need of dis
cipline, but just as a guide and sug
gestion. It is not the intention to
make them ironclad or inflexible.
Reasonable exceptions will be grant
ed gladly. Conversations which 1
have had with any number of young
women have convinced me that these
rules have the thorough commenda
tion of Oregon women.”
Following are the regulations for
women of the University, which now
govern women of the University, un
less under special permission:
1. University women must on all
nights of the week be in their rooms
at 10:30 p .m., except Friday and
Saturday nights, then at 11 o’clock
p. m.
2. No parties shall be given except
on Friday or Saturday nights, and
nights preceding holidays. These
parties shall end at 11:30 p. m., and
all participants be at home by 12:00
p. m.
3. Permission to give parties or
entertainments must be obtained
from the Committee on Student Af
fairs.
I. Underclassmen may attend but
one dance an evening a week, and
that either on Friday or Saturday
night.
5. Going out for evening calls or
entertainments must be confined to
Friday or Saturday evenings, unless
bv special permission of the H >u
Mother or Lady of the House.
(i. Women of the University, who
(Continued on last page.)
FRED B. SMITH SPEAKS
I'm <1 iv basketball Game Held Till
H:.'i(l to Allow for Address in
Villard.
I led I!. Smith and Raymond Rob
hin , the noted Y. M. C. A. workers
and speakers to men, now on a world
wide tour, will speak in Villard Hall,
Tue day evening, January 1 I, at 7
11 lock. I he basketball game sched
uled l'i r that evening, will not begin
until so as to not conflict.
I'-'I'd I!. Smith, head of the Religi
ous Work Department of the Inierna
tional Y. M. (’. A. Committee, is
termed the “Great Speaker to Men.”
Whil" here three years ago, he
packed \ illard Hall with an audience
entirely of men. Raymond Robbins,
w1o has never appeared in Eugene,
1 "ad of the Social Service phase
of the Men and Religion Forward
movement. lie is probably the great
est layman engaged in this kind of
work.
The International Association Quar
tette, which sings for the Victor
1 Tomograph Company, will appear.
The address will be free.