Oregon emerald. (Eugene, Or.) 1909-1920, December 19, 1912, Image 1

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    VOL XIV.
UNIVERSITY OF OREGON, EUGENE, THURSDAY. DECEMBER 19, 1912.
No. 40
PAPER SOLVENT
DECURES CAKE
DISCONTINUED PUBLICATION
WILL LEAVE SMALL SUR
PLUS BESIDES, SAYS
MANAGER
NEED NO OUTSIDE ASSISTANCE
Accounts and Resignation of Editor
for Consideration of Council after
Christmas Vacation.
“Contrary to the report from the
Executive Committee published in the
Saturday issue of the Emerald, stat
ing that the Monthly . faces a heavy
deficit, I will state that the Oregon
Monthly is not only solvent, but will
be able to show a surplus when the
accounts for the first issue are com
plete.’’ Such is the declaration of
Ralph H. Cake, manager of the Ore
gon Monthly.
“The last issue, the October num
ber, paid for itself and will leave a
small surplus when a mailing expense
account of about $43.00 is paid by
the Commercial Club. This item was
for copies mailed out on request of
Mr. Wilkins of the publicity commit
tee. It includes money paid to the
postmaster and to students hired at
25 cents an hour to do the wrapping
and addressing.
Last Issue Out Today.
“The final issue, distributed to sub
scribers today, is without advertising,
and will leave a deficit, but only about
half the amount mentioned in the
Emerald.
“The Oregon Monthly, in spite of
the unprofitable final issue, is abso
lutely solvent. Every bill will be met
within the next two weeks, and there
will be a small surplus. I will fur
nish a statement showing where every
cent came from and how it was
spent.
“The Monthly, now defunct, because
of its iability to get on the Mer
chants’ Association’s list of author
ized advertising mediums, has only
two liability items. It owes $451 to
Yoran & Koke for printing, and will
have, to pay back about $15 to sub
scribers who paid a year’s subscrip
tion in advance.
“As assets, we make the following
showing: Cash on hand, $42.30; due
from publicity committee of Commer
cial Club, $43; due from advertisers,
about $400. There is also a large
item due from unpaid subscriptions.
From subscribers fifty cents will be
collected as the value of the half
year’s numbers actually received.
“We were so confident of our finan
cial standing that we refused a sub
sidy of $100 from the University when
it was offered last spring. We did not
need this help then, and we do not
need it now. We can pay all our bills
without it.
(Continued on last pac« '
CHI OMEGA OFFERS $25 PRIZE TO
ENCOURAGE SOCIAL SERVICE STUDY
Award Is for Best Paper or Essay and
Three Faculty Members Will Act
as Judges.
Psi Alpha Chapter of the Chi Oynega
sorority announces the establishment
of a prize of twenty-five dollars ($25),
to be awarded to the University wo
man writing the best paper or essay
on any phase of social service work.
The names of those wishing to con
test should be in by January 12, and
the papers by March 16. The award
will be made on April 5. The papers
will be numbered and the three judges,
chosen from the Faculty, who will be
announced later, will be unaware of
the writers of the papers.
Beta Theta Pi entertained Miss
Emma Wise, Mr. H. K. Wise,
John Kestly, and John Kestly, Jr., at
dinner Tuesday evening.
room NETS $250
HOOVE ALL EXPENSES
(James With Multnomah and O. A. C.
Give Big Surplus, But Northern
Trips Prove Costly.
Graduate Manager Arthur Geary’s
football financial report submitted at
the meeting of the Athletic Council
Monday night, shows a balance of ap
proximately $250 after all outstand
ing bills have been paid. The profits
of the football games were as fol
lows: $1,676 cleared at the Multno
mah game; $1,636, at the O. A. C.
game; $600 at the Seattle game; $28
at the Freshman-Eugene High game;
$50 at the Willamette game; $30 on
the Idaho game. The losses were dis
tributed as follows: Approximately
$200 on the W, S. C. game, and $48
on the Whitman trip. Other expens
es of the football season were: Equip
ment and drugs, $815; coaching,
$2,000; $42 rooting expenses; $250
training table; sweaters, $77; send
ing men to see other teams in action,
$150; the balance of the expense was
spent in getting the field in shape,
printing, etc.
The total receipts were $3,800,
which with total expenditures of
$3,550, leaves $250 on the debit side
of the manager’s accounts.
Captain Roald Amundson is a good
speaker and a cultivated scholar.
Those who go to hear him when here
on April 1, will be able to see how
the South Pole was reached, for dur
ing this perilous trip he took motion
pictures of scenes and incidents, and
these will be exhibited while he re
lates the hardships they endured.
Harvard University has adopted a
new ruling to the effect that any
student desiring a B. S. degree, must
pass an examination over the entire
four years course covering his “Field
of Concentration.”
OREGON GLEE MAKES ANNUAL APPEARANCE 10
LOCAL PATRONS IN EUGENE THEATRE TONIGHT
The University of Oregon Glee Club
for 1912-13 makes its first appearance
at the Eugene Theatre this evening.
The seat sale has been heavy; the
club men are well prepared, and the
concert will, no doubt, be unusually
pleasing. The following is the pro
gram:
1. (a) “O, Oregon” .Strong
(b) “As I Sit and Dream at
Evening”.Nelson
Club.
2. “Sword of Ferrara”.Bullard
Club.
3. “A Bit of Nonsense” .
.Tortere
Kenneth Frazer.
5. “Call John” . Bradbury
Club.
6. “A Travesty or Two and a
Parody or Two” .
Shaver and Broadbridge.
7. (a) “Rocking Time” .Knox
(b) “Rockin’ in De Win’”.
.Neidlinger
(c) “De Sandman” .Protheroe
Club.
(Continued on last page.)
RIGHT OF WAY GIVEN OREGON
GLEE GLUO ALONG ITINERARY
CONFLICTING EVENTS CANCELLED IN VARIOUS TOWNS AND
GEARY SEES CLEAR SAILING AHEAD — PERFORMANCE
IS BEST IN MANY SEASONS
A clear field of engagements for
the Glee Club is reported by Manager
Geary. At almost every place some
other engagement had been billed, but
they have all been cancelled now in
favor of the Glee Club.
The following events have been
dodged: At Heppner, the annual New
Year’s eve dance; at Pendleton, the
Library ball; at Baker, several at
tractions; and at Hood River, a Ly
ceum lecture. “Invitations have
been received for parties and dances
at several towns, and the spirit with
which other events were cancelled,
shows the interest taken in the Glee
Club,” says Manager Geary. “We
have a good club this year, and 1
trust the students will boost for us
when they go home for the holi
days.”
The itinerary of the trip is as fol
lows: Astoria, Friday, December 27;
Portland, Saturday, December 28;
Heppner, Monday, December HO; Pen
dleton. Tuesday, December 31; La
Grande, Wednesday, January 1; Baker,
Thursday, .January 2; llood River,
Friday, January 3.
In Portland, the Glee Club is billed
at the Lincoln High School auditor
ium, and in Astoria at the Astoria
Theatre, corner of Parker and Market
streets. Manager Geary will accom
pany the club on its trip.
LEGISLATOR WANTS COPY
OF GRADE ATE’S THESIS
A recent member elect of the
House of Representatives from Med
ford, has written to Ben Williams,
’10, who is now studying law at Har
vard, for a copy of his thesis on the
Employer’s Liability Act, which won
fame for its writer last year.
The legislator desires the work of
the Oregon graduate to assist him in
obtaning an idea of what he consid
ers to be an important question to be
settled at the next session of the leg
islature. Williams has referred the
request to the department of Eco
nomics at the University, who will
supply the desired thesis.
AVERAGE FRESHMAN GIRL
IS WELL PROPORTIONED
Figures Show that Oregon Young
Lady Is About the Right Size
and Still Young.
"The average Freshman girl at the
University this year is a dainty little
maid,” declared an enthusiastic Sen
ior Co-ed, who had been studying
statistics recently issued, “just about
the right size and height and still
young enough to be sweetly pink
cheeked. In other words, less poetic,
though no more truthful, the ‘average
Freshman girl’ is eighteen years old,
is 63 inches tall, weighs 121.8 pounds,
and has a lung capacity of 168.2 cubic
centimeters. This is eight centimeters
greater than the average of the Fresh
man class at Michigan this year.
“By all the rules and regulations,
she is a ‘well-set-up’ miss with a
good physical development;—perhaps
just a pound or two too light for ab
solute perfection. Annette Kellerman,
the famous ‘mermaid,’ perhaps more
than any other woman of our day,
considered to have a perfect figure,
weighs just 126 ponds and stands six
ty-four inches. Judging by this stand
ard, our average Freshman girl meas
ures up very creditably.”
Among the Freshman girls, again,
there are at least twelve who have a
lung capacity exceeding 200 cubic cen
timeters. These are Florence Moffat,
214 cc.; Claire Raley, 206; Vaughn
McCormick, 204; Louisa Bailey, 220;
Anne Taylor, 204; Nina Miller, 206;
•Jeannette Wheatley, 270; Leola Ball.
222; Katherine Stanfield, 212; Lucile
Watson, 210; Charlie Fenton, 244;
Leola Heskett, 218.
Twice every year every Freshman
and Sophomore girl in college is given ;
a careful physical examination in the
physical training department and the '■
statistics given above are the results
of the autumn examinations of this'
year’s Freshmen.
ELEVEN TYPEWRITERS FOR
YOUNG JOURNALISTS
The eleven new Remington type
writers, which will be used in the
Journalism department, are expected
to arrive at any time from Portland.
These typewriters are old machines,
rebuilt by the Remington people. Pro
fessor Allen is very much pleased with
those already in the department and
says they are the best machines built.
They were purchased for $27 each. The
Journalism class was greatly in need
of these machines and a long felt want
will be relieved when they arrive.
Professor F. G. Young will be in
Portland Saturday, on business.
conversTaddresses
FACULTY GOLLOQUIAM
Discusses Alumni Organizations and
the Work They Are Doing at
Various Colleges.
“Alumni organizations in the older
colleges are only recently coming into
power and prominence, but their
growth during the last decade has
been in some respects phenomenal,
and their influence for good or ill has
been rapidly widening and deepen
ing.” This was the opening state
ment made by Professop Charles W.
Converse before the Faculty collo
quiam last Tuesday evening.
Professor Converse discussed at
some length the prevailing system of
alumni organizations. The president
of the University, the secretary of
the association, and the alumni clubs,
are the most important agencies for
the influence of the organization, ac
cording to Mr. Converse. “Dr. Prit
chett thinks that this increasing in
fluence of alumni organization will be
a large factor in determining the fu
ture form and character of our col
leges.” Mr. Converse went further
and stated Dr. Pritchett’s points of
good and bad features of the grow
ing influence due to organization. He
spoke at length ori the work of vari
ous alumni club of eastern colleges;
what they have done and what they
are trying to do in the way of pro
moting intelligent study of public af
fairs, to increase the interest of stu
dents in the duties of citizenship and
raise the standard of public life in the
United States. He-enumerated four
other objects these organizations have
in view: “To accomplish visible re
sults in good government. To in
fluence college men to take active part
in politics- if only as a watcher at
the polls, to induce colleges to give
courses in politics and government,
to obtain suffrage for college under
graduates.”
FACULTY ADVISOR CRITICISES
MOONLIGHT EFFECT AT DANCES
College Formats Look Better With
Much Light. Sophomores
Are Told.
Members of the University of Ore
gon Faculty are seekers of light;,'
declare committeemen of the Sopho
more class, smarting under recent ad
monitions for permitting moonlight
dances at the class formals Saturday I
night. The lights were far too low,
declared the Faculty advisor of the
Sophomores, as he cornered one or;
two of the 1915 committee men in l
Villard Hall yesterday morning after
the class hour. The admonished
Sophomores declare they cannot re
member the technical words used,
but they say they know now why
there should be light at a dance.
They also admit that they have been
instructed as to the proper ingred
ients for class dance punch.
EMERALD TO CONDUCT
LEGISLATIVE COLUMN
Copies to be Distributed at Session
to Inform Solons Concerning
Measures.
The Oregon Emerald will conduct
a Legislative column for the benefit
of the State Legislators during the
next session of the solons in January.
This department will be under the
supervision of the department of eco
nomies.
To further the plan, Manager An
drew Collier has consented to place
upon the desk of every member of
both houses a copy of the Emerald
three times a week, especially marked
for their benefit. Although this will
cost the management several dollars
each issue, the benefit to be derived
was thought sufficient to justify the
move.
The plan is to present in the Em
erald maps, charts, analyses, dia
grams and bibliography as the Uni
versity’s contribution to the people of
the state and their representatives.
Requests for material and guidance
in the studying of questions are be
ing received daily by the department,
and by presenting this material pre
pared by the department in the Em
erald three times a week, it is hoped
to satisfy these demands, ■ most of
which come from the Legislators
themselves.
oooo o o o o o o o o
o o
o The University sessions will o
o reopen Monday morning, Jan- o
o nary fi>. Cuts will register from o
o that morning. The . Emerald o
o will appear Saturday. Decern- o
o cember 28. o
o ,o
o oooo o o oooo o
The Kappa Alpha Theta held its
annual Christmas tree party at the
Chapter house Wednesday evening.
CO-ED CONCEDE
WOMENS GLEE CLUB TO AP
PEAR EARLY IN JAM ARY
WITH FULL PROGRAM IN
EUGENE THEATRE
BOWMAN PRAISES SINGERS
Stunts and Skits Will be Given—
Proceeds k*> to Student
Exchequer.
The first strictly all Co-ed Glee
('luh concert in the history of the
University was announced yesterday
evening by the Women’s Choral
Club. It will occur at the Eugene
Theatre, on the first open date in
January.
The Executive Committee has re
cently granted the organization tem
porary student activity status, in
order to lend them money. .The club
will donate all the surplus proceeds
of the concert to the Student Rody
treasury. However, the women will
manage the production entirely, even
to the drawing up of the contract.
After practicing steadily for the
last two months, the women warblers
are ready for their first down town
appearance, and Director M. L. Bow
man has incidentally given the club
credit for being one of the best
choral organizations that he has ever
coached.
The program, although not settled
as to details, will include a full reper
toire of ensemble numbers and solos.
It is stated that a skit is being writ
ten especially for the club by a prom
inent writer. Other minor stunts
will complete the list of numbers.
A new director will be selected in
a few days to take the place of M.
L. Bowman, who was forced to give
up his work in the University in or
der to accept a position with a trav
eling company.
Continual interruptions have beset
the Choral Club in their practice. The
Dramatic Club drove them out of
Villard Hall, and conflicting meetings
and difficulties have made their work
arduous.
MRS. PRESCOTT UNDERGOES
OPERATION IN PORTLAND
Mrs. Robert Prescott is seriously
ill at the Saint Vincent’s hospital in
Portland, as the result of an opera
tion for intestinal trouble. She has
been in the Portland institution since
Thanksgiving.
About a year ago an operation for
appendicitis was performed, but the
treatment resulted in complications,
which necessitated further attention.
Recovery has not been rapid, although
her many friends hope for an ultim
ate recovery.
FRESHMAN WINDNAGLE FINISHES FIRST
IN CROSS COUNTRY TRY-OUT RUN
Vere Windnatrle, the ex-Washin^-1
ton Hijfh School sttir, sprung a sur
prise yesterday when he defeated
Track Captain Walter McClure by
about 16 feet, in a free for all cross
country race over the two and a half
mile course. Windnafrle covered the
distance in 14 minutes and 10 sec
onds. This is considered (rood time,
since the course was muddy and the
footing uncertain.
Franklin Allen finished in third
; place about 100 yards back of the
j winner, and was followed by Gra-|
I ham McConnel.
Donald Onthank, Frank Holt, Har
len Pefley, and Earl Blackaby, fin
isht'd in the order named. Onthank
and Holt crossed the line about 100
yards ahead of the others.
The run was not held for points,
but merely to enable Bill Hayward
and Captain McClure to get a line
on prospective material for the pro
posed cross-country race with O. A.
C. Nothing definite will be known
concerning the race until after the
Northwest Conference at Seattle,
December 20 and 21.
o