Oregon emerald. (Eugene, Or.) 1909-1920, October 22, 1912, Image 1

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    UNIVERSITY OF OREGON
VOL. XIV. EUGENE, OREGON, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 22, 1912. No. 15
UNDAUNTED BY DEFEAT
VARSITY MAKES READY
THE STONEWALL DEFENSE AND
BACK FIELD SPRINTERS WIN
FOR WHITMAN
OREGON TEN MEN TEAM A FEATURE
Pinkham Optimistic, in Spite of De
pleted Ranks—Bender Also
Confident.
(By Tommy Boylen.)
Beaten by the decisive score of 20
to 0 by Whitman, the smallest college
in the conference, and suffering the
humiliation of the first defeat by that
college in the history of Northwest
football, Oregon’s warriors returned
Sunday evening.
Plain Football Wins for Whitman.
Whitman won on straight football,
using its back field of sprinters to
good advantage on end runs. Besides
being a scoring machine, the Mission
aries put up a stonewall defense, and
Oregon’s only yardage was made by
trick plays and forward passes.
A play reminiscent of the old days
when Oregon’s band of eight cripples
stood off the Idaho eleven, was made
during the third quarter, when the
lemon-yellow team, not realizing that
Fenton was out of the game, charged
down the field for several downs, with
but ten men.
Whitman scored touchdowns in the
first, third and fourth quarters, and
kicked all goals but the last. Oregon
all but scored in the second quarter,
when once the ball was within three
inches and again but four feet from
the final chalk mark. Thus it is in
dicated that the score does not show
the relative strength of the two
teams.
Officials Are Not Discouraged.
But from the statements of Coach
Pinkham and Captain Walker, it can
be understood that Oregon intends to
make a desperate attempt at a come
back next Saturday in the game with
Washington State College.
“I am not discouraged over Satur- j
day’s game,” says Pinkham. “We
were defeated by a better team and
we have no hard luck story. We will
beat Pullman Saturday. Wait and
see.”
“We were outplayed, but we should
have scored. I think that our defeat
was due to lack of old men in the line
up. We will come back strong and;
win Saturday’s game.” So says Cap
tain Dean Walker.
More Men Posted.
But regardless of the optimistic
views taken by Oregon’s football
leaders, it is apparent that Oregon is
facing a serious proposition. The real
blow came yesterday afternoon, when
Holden, Parsons, Jones, and Garrett
were reported low in their studies.
Besides barring these four men from
the squad, Ainslee, the 210-pound
guard from Drain, has been forced to
quit college because of eye trouble.
Fenton, Heusner, and Anunsen,
who were slightly injured in Satur
day’s game, will probably be in the
game again, but Hall will still be on
the side lines with his lame shoulder.
Inasmuch as both Coach Bender, of
Pullman, and Coach Pinkham predict
victory for their teams, it is evident
that the approaching struggle will be
a fight from start to finish.
Forty men, under the leadership of
Captain Ilaimbaugh, have begun ac- j
tive training for the cross country
team at the University of Michigan, i
MISS WATSON SPEAKS;
MEETING PLACE CHANGED
The regular meeting of the Y. W.
C. A. was held in the women’s gym
nasium Monday afternoon. Maud
Mastick led the meeting, Eva Brock
furnishing special music. Miss Mary
Watson was the speaker of the after
noon.
Miss Watson’s subject was, “The
Value of the Bible to the University
Student.” She showed that while the
Bible was never meant to be taken as
authority on Geology, Geography,
and Astronomy, yet it is worth while
to be considered seriously by the Uni
versity student, not only as a master
piece of literature, portraying ideal
characters and historic life, but as a
guide to man’s conduct of life and re
ligion. She further represented the
Bible as a necessity for attaining the
highest degree of efficiency and the
best standard of a useful and happy
life.
Several members of the Advisory
Board were present. Mrs. Sweetser
announced that the regular meetings
of the Y. W. C. A. would hereafter be
held in Paul Bond’s Shack. The asso
ciation is planning to have one social
meeting there a month. From all in
dications, association women will find
the Shack an ideal meeting place.
FIRE ILLUMINES RALLY
Rooters Will Explore Main Streets \
Under Guidance of
Blackman.
The principle rally of the year, with
the annual Freshman bonfire, will be
held Friday evening, before the Ore
gon-W. S. C. game. The Freshmen
are already performing the prelimin
ary tasks of building the fire, and are
busy erecting the skeleton of the big
heap.
The rally, under direction of Abe
Blackman, will start from the Dor
mitory at 7:30 P. M. After forming
the full line from the different houses,
as usual, the line will proceed down
town to Willamette street, yells and
general commotion will advertise the
game on the morrow. Willamette
street explored, the rooters will re
turn to the football field by way of
Eleventh street. When the line
reaches Alder street, the fire on the
football field will be lighted, and fur-1
ther proceedings will be illumined by
its light.
From an improvised rostrum near
the grandstand, the assembled crowd
will hear speeches from Coach Pink
ham and his assistants, Captain
Walker, Bill Hayward ,and other men,
who are always on hand at the ral
lies.
PROF. SCHAFER SPEAKS TO
EASTERN OREGON TEACHERS
Professor Schafer returned Satur-!
night from a trip to Enterprise, Wal- j
Iowa County. Oregon, where he ad-,
dressed the Eastern Oregon branch
of the State Teacher’s Associations.
The subject of his address was, “New;
Movements in Education.”
Dr. Schafer also addressed the High I
School section of the convention on
“The Use of Local History in the
High School,” and the rural section
upon the same topic.
Dr. Schafer speaks Saturday to the
Lorane Grange in this county upon
the subject of “Good Roads.”
, , _
The Freshmen Babies Will Be Soon j
Exhibited.
Plans for the Freshmen-girl baby
party, annually held in the Women’s
Gymnasium, will be made at the reg
ular meeting of the Y. W. C. A. cab
inet today.
Y.W.C.A.MAKES FINAL
STATEMENT OF PLANS
FOR GIRLS’ BUNGALOW
$2,080 OF NECESSARY $2,500 NOW
ON HAND FOR BUILDING
PURPOSES
PROF. ADAMS IS DESIGNER OF HOME
Bazaar and Society Circus Relied On
to Supply Present $420
Deficit.
After three years of effort toward
a bungalow, the Y. W. C. A. of the
University is prepared to build a col
lege home next spring on the Associa
tion’s property adjoining the Y. M. C.
A. lot on Twelfth and Kincaid streets.
Of a necessary fund of $2,500 to build
and furnish the bungalow, assets
amouting to $2,080, are in the hands
of the Advisory Board.
Buildings Will Be Useful.
The bungalow, facing on the cam
pus, will offer a home for University
women, and serve as headquarters for
women’s clubs, where lectures and so
cial affairs may be given. “We
would like to have been on the cam
pus,” said Miss Beach, “but we have
a location almost as convenient for
the girls.”
Professor Adams has designed the
bungalow. His plans show a lecture
room of one hundred and fifty seating
capacity, office rooms for the Associa
tion, a rest room in the rear, a kit
chen and pantry, where “eats” can
be provided, an alcove and vestibule.
Bungalow will be 25x50.
Professor Reddie has consented to
assist in interior finishings and fur
nishings.
ttazaar win liaise uencu.
The Association will hold a bazaar
on December 6, at the First Presby
terian Church, as a means of realizing
their deficit of $420. A Society Cir
cus in the men’s gymnasium next
March, including a minstrel show,
may supplant last year’s Jardin-de
Paris and Orpheum.
The accounts of the Advisory
Board stand as follows:
Invested in six per cent
bonds .$1,860.40
Uncollected pledge . 120.00
Material and work offered.... 100.00
Total assets .$2,080.40
100 TtCKETS ON SALE
(leary Plans Last Effort to Boost Sea
son Passes—Reduction to Late
Buyers (liven.
Manager Geary announces that the
season ticket system has reached the
crucial stage of its existence, and the
ultimate outcome of the plan will be
decided by the end of the present
week.
At present it is necessary that one
hundred more tickets be sold, and
plans are being made for a recanvass
of the various fraternities and soror
ities. The Oregon Club, which will
hold a meeting next Thursday after
noon, will at that time consider the
same subject. In order to bring the
plan to a successful conclusion, Mr.
Geary announces that all those buy
ing tickets during the next week will
be allowed a reduction of fifty cents
for the price of their admission to the j
Willamette game.
Miss Barbara Booth spent the past
week-end in Salem.
GERMANS MEET AT LAMBDA
RHO HOUSE TONIGHT
The monthly meeting of the Ger
man Club will be held tonight at the
Lambda Rho house. An interesting
program has been arranged as fol
lows:
Solo . Eva Brock
Debate—
Negative — Howard Zimmerman
and Chester Kronenberg.
Affirmative—Eleanor McClaine and
Amy Rothchild.
“Why I Wish I Were a German”
.Ellice Shearer
“Value of German Study”.
.Vernon Motschenbacher
Solo .Homer Maris
Recitation .Ruth Peters
Address .Dr. Schmidt
Subject—Industrial Conditions in
Germany.
Dr. Schafer Writes Bulletin.
The next University Bulletin, deal
ing with the extension and common
wealth work of the University, will be
written by Dr. Schafer.
The Bulletin has been divided into
three main divisions, namely, corres
pondence studies to be obtained in the
school, the extention of lecture cours
es, and an account of the various
types of commonwealth service.
ZUE8LIN IS SPEAKER
Well Known Lecturer Is An Author
ity on Civic Improve
ment.
I _
Professor Charles Zueblin, publicist,
lecturer, and city builder, will deliver
the address at the regular Assembly
tomorrow morning on the subject,
“Education and Life.”
It was through the efforts of Miss
Julia Burgess, president of the Fort
nightly Club, and the University fac
ulty, Professor Zueblin was secured
to speak before the Student Body.
Mr. Zueblin is the author of “A De
cade of Civic Development,” “Amer
ican Municipal Progress,” and “Dem
ocracy and the Overman.” As presi
dent of the American League of Civic
Improvement, he made plans for the
reconstruction of the city of Harris
burg, Pennsylvania. He has been the
special advisor to the Chicago Park
Commission and speaks as an expert
upon plans for beautifying cities and
improving civic conditions.
Mr. Zueblin is at present professor
of Sociology at the University of Chi
cago, where he is at the head of the
extension work. He is also editor of
the Twentieth Century Magazine, and
contributes to journals of Sociology
and Ethics. The speaker is now on
his way to Portland from San Fran
cisco, where he has delivered a series
of lectures.
ATTEND AN GE GROWS
Six hundred and thirty-eight stu
dents have registered in the Univer
sity since the opening of college. Of
this number, 229 entered as Fresh
man, 129 as Sophomores, 128 claimed
Junior standing, while 118 have reg
istered as Seniors. There have been
fourteen students enter as Special,
while ten have undertaken post grad
uate work.
At the end of the first semester last
year there had been 636 registered in
the University, which shows an in
crease of two in the present enroll
ment over last year’s number.
No figures have been compiled to
show the number of men and women
in the institution, although last year
the men outnumbered the women to
the extent of 350 men to 286 women, i
POLLSOPENSOONFOR
EMERALD STRAW VOTE
ON VITAL QUESTIONS
THE PRESIDENTIAL RACE HEAD
LINER ON TRIAL
BALLOT
EQUAL SUFFRAGE WILL PREVAIL
Alcoholism in Eugene to be Voted on
—Suggestions on Timely Topics
Asked.
A straw vote to determine student
sentiment on questions to be voted on
at the coming national and state elec
tions will be conducted by the Emer
ald next week. The balloting will
probably take place Wednesday, Octo
ber 30, and the system used at the
straw vote before the primaries last
spring will be followed.
Universal Suffrage to Prevail.
Suffrage will be extended to the
women equally with the men, and the
faculty will also be asked to go on
record. The presidential race will, of
course, attract most interest, and sup
porters of Taft, Wilson, Roosevelt,
and Debs, are already active in draw
ing up their forces.
Stute Questions on Ballot
Initiative and referendum measures
which are to go before the people at
tho national election and which are
likely to prove of special interest to
undergraduates, will be voted on
equal suffrage, the proposed millage
tax bill for the support of the Uni
versity and Agricultural College, and
tho question, whether Eugene sail be
“wet” or “dry,”’ are among the issues
which will be submitted to the stu
dents. Last spring the results of the
straw ballot proved a very good fore
cast of the actual decisions of the
voters of the state.
IiOcal Questions Wanted.
Questions of purely college interest
will also be submitted at the election.
Topics of live local interest may be
submitted to the Emerald for use on
the ballot any time this week.
SORORITY FRESHMEN HAVE
TO WEAR GREEN CAI’S
The Freshman girls in the Lambda
Rho house, from recent rules passed
by their upperclassmen, must wear
green dust caps while performing
their household duties. This plan,
which corresponds to the wearing of
the green by the Freshmen boys, has
so far been reported as working well.
The girls admit that the caps are
“not so bad after all,” since they have
become accustomed to wearing them.
The caps will be worn up to Junior
week-end, at which time they will be
laid aside with appropriate ceremon
ies. Tn all probability they will be
instituted as a house custom.
Orchestra Will Give a Concert Next
Semester.
Practically all of the University or
chestra attended the practice held in
Villard Hall last night, despite the
heavy downpour. The meetings are
being devoted at present to prepara
tions for a concert the early part of
next semester, the final arrangement
for which will be made next week,
when the musical director will meet
with them.
Dr, Kranzlein, former University of
Michigan track trainer, has gone to
Europe. It is rumored that he will
train some European team for the
next Olympic games.