Oregon emerald. (Eugene, Or.) 1909-1920, March 23, 1912, Image 1

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    VOL. XIII.
EUGENE. OREGON. SATURDAY, MARCH 23. 1912.
No. 11
01C. CONSENTS TO
PATCH UP QUARREL
WITH‘SISTER OREGON’
APPOINTS COMMITTEE TO AR
RANGE MATTERS FOR FUTURE
RELATIONS
OREGON MANAGER READY TO SIGN DATES
Oregon Students Glad that Quarrel
Has Ended and Anxious to Meet
Old Rival.
Now that Oregon and 0. A. C. are
on speaking terms again, the fans in
Oregon can look forward to some keen
competition in the line of athletics.
0. A. C. will probably meet us this
spring in track and baseball, but little
hope is held out for a possible meet
ing to settle the basketball squabble.
On account of the strong sentiment on
the campus in favor of the resumption
of relations between the two colleges,
it will not be necessary to call a stud
ent body meeting, as no resolutions
were made which need be rescinded.
The matter will pass into the hands of
Graduate Manager Geary, who will
go ahead with his schedule for spring
sports and next fall’s football game.
The resolutions passed by the 0. A.
C. Student Body read as follows:
Resolved: “That the presiSent of
the student body be instructed to ap
point a committee of three members, of
which he shall be one, and which shall
include one other student and profes
sor R. D. Hetzel, of the faculty.
That this committee be and hereby is
instructed to negotiate with the rep
resentatives of the University of Ore
gon for the establishment of student
relations on a mutually satisfactory
basis.”
The student body voted to instruct
the committee as follows:
“That an understanding be reached
between this committee and the repre
sentatives of the University of Oregon
which shall provide that the students
of these two institutions shall meet
upon a basis which recognizes their
equal duties and obligations as stud
ents of higher learning.
“That to establish this relationship
the committee shall enter into an
agreement with the representatives of
the University of Oregon which shall
provide for the scheduling of athletic
contests, including a football game for
1912; forensic and other activities
consistent with the understanding and
the friendliest lelations; that the rep
rentatives of these institutions shall
determine upon some course which
shall guarantee as completely as pos
sible to the students of each institu
tion immunity from disparaging press
reports emanating from the other.”
PRESIDENT CAMPBELL
TALKS TO Y. M. C. A.
President P. L. Campbell gave an
interesting talk to the Y. M. C. A.
Thursday evening, on "The Choosing
of a Life Work.”
He believes that this is one of the
greatest problems which a young man
must faee and in deciding opon a pro
fession he should have as his object,
the greatest gobd for humanity. The
community will reward a man accord
ing to his service and ability. The
leading requisite of success is the
ability to work in harmony with other
people. GreAt as is the value of in
dividual endeavor in life, he eoirthfids
that the great institutions of the
world—tW Church, the StafA, and
thA School, shodld not Sb‘ igttoTAd by
anyone who wishes to succeed.
. CARLTON SPENCER
REPRESENTS OREGON
—
Carlton Spencer, of Cottage Grove,
jwas the orator chosen in the tryouts
held Wednesday night to represent the
University of Oregon in its annual
Interstate Oratorical Contest with the
State Universities of Washington and
Montana, Pullman, and Whitman, to
take place at Missoula, May 25. Spen
cer was the winner of the State Inter
collegiate Contest last year, and two
years ago, as a Freshman, won the
Alumni Debate Medal given annually
to the best debater in the University.
The Oregon orator deals with “The
Rust in Our Legal Machinery.”
DORMITORY FRESHMEN RACE
TO ESCAPE AN-NUAL SPLASH
Friday evening, at 7 o’clock, the
Dorm freshmen held their annual race
from the front of the dormitory to the
frog pond. The winners were Sidwell,
and Airrey.
The two finishing last, who went into
the pond, were “Buddy” Ryan and
Clarence Brotherton. There were
about twenty applicants for positions
of honor. The race was held under
the protecting care of the Dorm up
per-classmen. Elliot Roberts was
starter, and George Shantin, Tubby
Wentworth, and Bill Neil officiated at
the finish.
LEAGUE DIRECTORS MEET
Baseball, Track, and Tennis Are Up
for Discussion <}nd Await Action
of Committees.
A meeting of the directors of the:
Interfraternity Athletic Association
was held last Tuesday in the men’s
dormitory and several important
committees were appointed.
A committee was appointed to ar
range a schedule for the baseball
games which will be played off in the
near future. The games this year
will probably be conducted under the
same general rules as those in force
last year.
At the same time a committee was
appointed to confer with Bill Hay
ward concerning a track meet. Bill
has been endeavoring to start some
thing of the kind and has put up a
handsome trophy cup to be awarded
to the winner of the 440 in case the
meet is pulled off.
The question of a fraternity tennis
tournament was also brought up, but
since the subject is a new one, the
matter was laid on the table until
the representatives could determine
the attitude of their fraternities on
the matter.
REFERENDUM DECISION
POSTPONED AGAIN
The decision of the Supreme Court
in the now famous referendum case
may be postponed another week. The
decision was expected Tuesday, March
26, but the counsel for the state has
asked for additional time.
The President, Faculty, and Stud
ents, who have watched the progress
of the case from its beginning are
hopeful of the ultimate outcome, but
regret the contiual delays.
If the Supreme Court decides in
favor of the University, the construc
tion of the buildings provided for in
the appropriation will be begun im
medlately, in ofder to have theiri as
near completion as possible by next
fall. It is hoped that at least one
will be ready for occupancy by Sep
tember.
-- - -
The Mu Phi Epsilons gave their
ftfg&Sahet Rifling it Mrs!.' A. C. Dfx
oh’i Mondky night.
Miss Myra Loveridee, formerly of
Eugene, but now 6f PorfUted; is
spending £ dajls it the Chi Omega
house.
T
DRAMATIC CLUB WILL
APPEAR IN ‘CANDIDA’
NEXT MONDAY NIGH
CLEVER CAST PROMISES STAR
ENTERTAINMENT FOR THOSE
WHO ATTEND PLAY
PROCEEDS TO INTERSCHOLASTIC MEET
Prof. Reddie Puts Finishing Touches
on Exceptional Array of Dram
atic Talent.
“The Student Body should give the
Dramatic Club Play “Candida” their
hearty support. It means the financ
ing of the Interstate Track Meet, one
of the best ways of advertising the
University. If you want to help
Oregon, you can’t find a better way,
nor one out of which you will get more
personal enjoyment. “There is Life
and Action from the Rise of the Cur
tain to the Fall.”
In this way F. E. Dunton, president
of the Dramatic Club, pleads for the
support of the students for the club’s
production, which will appear Monday
evening, at the local theater.
Under the direction of Prof. Reddie,
the cast have held their last rehearsal
today and confident of their cues, await
the rise of the curtain, on what is
said to be the most finished produc
tion ever put on by an Oregon dram
atic organization.
As to “Candida,” the realistic pro
blem play of Bernard Shaw, dealing
with a woman’s struggle against pow
erful forces of evil, little more can
be said. On account of its classical
character, Manager Warner is not
over confident that the production
will be a great financial success, as
the expense of advertising has been
a heavy item. Nevertheless, he ex
pects to turn over a balance to the
track meet.
Along this same line, Manager
Geary said, “The students should
show their appreciation of the club’s
offer to give half the proceeds to the
track meet by their hearty support.
I understand that “Candida” is a play
of exceptional merit.”
When asked for a statement, Prof.
Reddie said he was satisfied with the
work of the cast and their handling
of the parts. He spoke especially of
Dimm, the frosh actor, who as
“Marshbanks,” the physically-good
for-nothing poet, promises to make a
hit.
The cast is as follows:
Proserpine Garnett, stenographer..
. Nancy Noon
Rev. James Mavor Morell, Chris
tian Scientist .Forrest Dunton
Rev. Alexander Mill, his curate. ..
. Frank Dudley
Mr. Bdrgess, Candida’s father.
.Alexander Martin
Candida, wife of Morell..
.....,. Maude Beals
Eugene Marshbanks, a poet.
.Walter Dimm
Scene: Morell’s study, St. Dominic’s
parsonage, Hackney Road, Victoria
Park, London.
Time: The present.
Seats are now selling atthe theater,
50c, 75c, and $1.00.
Prof. Barnett Writes.
In the American Journal of Political
Science for February, Prof. Barnett, Of
the Department of Political Science,
has an article on the “Recall of
Judges in fttegbn,” in dfcicH be treats
the binary^ development and later
working yt tfcdt pharil Of popular
government in Oregon.
SENIORS WHO WOULD TEACH
SEE FACULTY COMMITTEE
Senior registration blanks, of the
Faculty Appointment Committe, for
all Seniors who expect to teach next
year, are ready at Prescott’s office.
These cards are to be filled out with
all the data necessary, as recommend
ations. work done, positions held, that
will help the appointment committee
in their work of recommending teach
ers.
This year a fee of one dollar will
be charged to each applicant, payable
at the steward’s office, which will cover
the cost of making duplicate copies of
all records, recommendations, and
possible phone charges. The applica
tion committee will forward these
duplicate blanks to all possible vac
ancies.
Seniors are urged to fill out and file
their cards as soon as possible with
Bert Prescott.
Cards have been issued for the first
annual dance of Mu Phi Epsilon to
be given Saturday, March 30, at the
Folly Hall.
Miss Zona Haight, of Albany, spent
the week-end with Gertie Taylor and
Elsie Bain.
George Frazier is making an ex
tended business trip in Portland.
CO-ED DEBATE TRYOUT
All Those Interested, Requested to
Hand in Names Before April
Second.
At a meeting of the Committee on
Oratory and Debate Monday evening,
it was decided to hold the tryout for
choosing the co-ed debating team,
April 2. The committee recommend
that all those intending to try for the
teahi hand in their names to Earl
Jones or Arthur Geary as soon as pos
sible. It has been suggested by some
that there will probably not be enough
interested in the co-ed debate to just
ify a contest. If such is the case, the
committee are anxious to know it,
and will not make further arrange
ments with Washington. The subject
dceided upon is, “Resolved, That
equal suffrage should be adopted by
the various states at the next elec
tion.
O. A. C. MAIDS PRACTICE
ECONOMICAL COOKING
According to recent advice received
from O. A. C., the domestic science de
partment of that school is turning out
an exceedingly capable bunch of cooks
and incidentally a lot of good raw ma
terial for future wives is being devel
oped.
The girls, who are under the direc
tion of Miss Milan, recently served a
delectable chicken dinner for the
small sum of twenty-two cents per
plate. President Kerr, the State Exe
cutive, and various other dignitaries,
were present, and all were highly en
thusiastic over the spread.
CHEMISTRY CLUB PROGRAM
ANNOUNCED FOR MONDAY
For the Chemistry Club program,
ernoon, in McClure Hall, at 4 o’clock,
the following speakers and subjects
have been announced:
Mr. Wheelon wifi treat, “The Rela
tion feetweeh Chemical Reaction Ve
locity and Physiological Processes.”
Hal Bean will present a paper on the
“Relation Between Electrolytes and
Physiological Processes, and Heart
Beats and the Effect of Sodiutn, Po
tassium, ahd Caldyn),” Prof. Boyard
wilt spek* “feffect of Sodium,
PdtcttfciftLdtfd Calcium on CIn Divi
sion and Development.”
which
GRADE COMPARISONS
WITH LAST SEMESTER
TENDENCY DOWNWARD
WOMEN’S ORGANIZATIONS LEAD
MEN FOB SCHOLARSHIP
PREEMINENCE
MISSOURI SYSTEM RAISES STANDARD
Students Residing; in Eugene Are Met
ier Students Than Those From
Out of Town.
The registrar’s report indicating the
individual scholarship of the Univer
sity students and the compiled aver
ages and standing of the various stud
ent groups, is out and shows a de
crease of fiom 13 to 8.1) per cent from
last year.
The women students generally show
the highest grades, as seven groups
of women are listed before any men’s
organization. Mary Spiller Hall, the
girl’s dormitory, stands at the head of
the list with 88 per cent. Last year
seven house averages wore above 88
per cent and only four out of the com
plete list of twenty-one have im
proved over last year’s standing.
The new grading system, called the
Missouri system, is largely responsible
for the decrease in grades. While this
system did not go into effect until this
present semester, it was chosen by the
faculty before last semester’s grades
were banded in and is reported to have
had the effect of causing the profes
sors to tighten up in their markings.
Another notable fact is that the
students whose permanent homes are
in Eugene, show a higher general
average than the out of town stud
ents.
The following is the order of the
houses with respect to standing ac
cording to the grades given out by
the registrar:
Mary Spiller Hall (the girls’ dormi
tory), 88 per cent; Lambda Rho soror
ity, 87.9 per cent; Chi Omega sorority,
87.6 per cent; women living in Eugene,
87.4 per cent; Gamma Delta Gamma
sorority, 86.8 per cent; Kappa Alpha
Theta sorority, 86.2 per cent; men liv
ing in town, 86.1 per cent; Tri Delta
sorority, 85.8 per cent; Gamma Phi
Beta sorority, 85.6 per cent; men’s
dormitory, 85 per cent; Delta Sigma
fraternity, 84.7 per cent; Acacia fra
ternity, 84.1 per cent; Alpha Tau
Omega fraternity, 8.1.7 per cent; Kap
pa Sigma fraternity, 83.7 per cent;
Avava Club (men’s), 83 per cent;
Phi Gamma Delta fraternity, 82.8 per
cent; Beta Theta Pi fraternity, 82.6
per cent; Sigma Chi fraternity,
81.1 per cent, and Tawah Club. (9.1
per cent.
In computing these figures the au
thorities averaged “A” grades (95 to
100), at 96; “B” grades (f)0 to 95), at
9t per cent; “C” grades (80 to 90), at
85 per cent; “D” grades (70 to 86), at
75 per cent; conditional work at 70
per cent, and “E” grades (below 70),
at 60 per cent. Work uncompleted
was not included in the estimates.
President Ackerman Will Speak.
The speaker ( at next Wednesday’s
assembly will be Pres. A. H. Acker
man, of the Sftate Normal School, at
Monmouth, who will speak on “Edu
cational Unrest.” For a number of
yaers, President Ackerman, served as
State Superintendent of Public In
struction.
Mips Helen Cake left Tuesday.morn
hig for Portland, ori account of a se
vere cold.