Oregon emerald. (Eugene, Or.) 1909-1920, March 13, 1912, Image 1

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    UNIVERSITY OF OREGON
VOL. XIII. EUGENE, OREGON, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 1912. No. 38
ROOSEVELT IS THE FAVORITE AT OREGON
484 VOTES CAST OUT
OF A POSSIBLE 670
IN STRAW CONTEST
EMERALD COMPLSORY SUB
SCRIPTION CARRIED BY VOTE
OF 310 TO 96
WILLIAM H. TAFT SECOND WITH 116 VOTES
Single Tax, Recall of Judges, and Mis
souri Grading System Are Voted
Down.
* The Associated Students and Fac- *
* ulty of the University of Ore- *
* gon Total Vote in Emerald *
* Election. *
* _ *
* For President—
* Theodore Roosevelt.169
* Woodrow Wilson...109
* W. H. Taft.116
* T. B. Harmon . 3
W. J. Brwan. 27
Robert M. La Follette. 31
Champ Clark . 7
Eugene V. Debs . 10
Barzee . 3
* Woman’s Suffrage—
* Yes .257
* No .226
Judicial Recall
Yes .170
No .271
Single Tax—
Yes .127
No .312
University Examination Honor *
System—
Yes .185
No .185
Compulsory Subscription to
Emerald—
Yes .310
No
96 *
Student Self Government— *
Yes .365 *
No .103 *
Retention of Missouri Grading *
System—
Yes .183
No .263
Retention of Two Hour Exam
ination Schedule—
Yes .332
No .142
By Fen Waite.
In the big Emerald election held
on Tuesday and Wednesday of this
week, Theodore Roosevelt, of New
York, was endorsed by the Oregon
faculty and student body for United
States presidential nominee.
By a margin of 53 votes over the
next nearest candidate, William H.
Taft, the varsity voters voiced their
preference for the great ex-president
and national idol, whose fame and
favor gained as a soldier, statesman,
lion hunter, and political leader, seems
deeply rooted in the hearts of the
student generation of the Oregon peo
ple.
The Woman Suffrage issue was car
ried by 31 votes, due to the enthus
iastic electioneering of the varsity
suffragettes. A stubborn resistance
to the suffrage measure was voiced by
the vote of the varsity men, but the
faculty enlisted their support with
the co-eds, resulting in victory perch
ing on the banner of the women.
The compulsory subscription to the
Emerald was voiced «y an overwhelm
Continued on Supplement.
CLUB WILL SHARE PROCEEDS
WITH HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETES
In order to give the Interscholastic
Track meet, which occures during Ju
nior Week-End a financial boost, fifty
per cent of the net proceeds from the
Dramatic Club’s “Candida,” to be
given March 25th, will be donated by
Manager Warner to that enterprise.
Giving one of Bernard Shaw’s
plays, which should be of interest to
students of English literature, it is
hoped that last year’s success may be
repeated. If so, the club manage
ment will turn over a neat sum to the
athletic affair, feeling that it can do
so, since there is now a balance of
nearly one hundred dollars in the club
treasury.
******** **
* BUSHER CALLS TO LOYAL *
SONS OF OREGON FOR NOISE
$jtc9|c:|c:fci|e3|c:|c $ $
In order to encourage the men and
put a little pip into the Washington
games, “Yell Leader" Brown will con
duct organized rooting and urges
every man in college to attend at
least one of the games and help out
the rooting section. This is the first
time organized rooting has been at
tempted at a basketball game, and an
effort will be made to make it of
value.
EARLY PRACTICE SLOW
Jamison Still Busy With Basketball—
Freshman Material a Disap
pointment.
Captain Jamison is still busy at
basketball, so, until after the Wash
ington game, baseball practice is
held under the direction of Cady
Roberts. So far the work has been
only to get the men into form and
limber up the rusty Joints, the “sur
vival-of-the-fittest” system will not be
in operation until the warm days have
given all candidates an equal chance.
Budding world-beaters seem rather
scarce in the freshmen class. It was
hoped that some good material might
be drawn from the babes, and they
will probably show up better with the
winter stiffness worked out.
The diamond has been worked over
several times during the last week, so
that it is now in fairly good condi
tion.
Kay and Latourette have both
turned from track and decided to take
a fling at baseball.
The freshmen who have reported so
far are: Vosper, Welch, Lytle, Moore,
Bigbee, Dorris, and Grady.
Socialists Will Convene.
The Twentieth Century Club,
which met for the first time last Wed
nesday evening, made arrangements
for its second regular meeting, to be
held next winter. Several musical
numbers will be provided, and a cap
able speaker secured.
The Club is organized for the pur
pose of studying twentieth century
social problems, chief among which
is socialism. Officers of the organ
ization will make further announce
ments later.
Mathew S. Wallis, B. S., ’78, one of
the five members of the first graduat
ing class, lives in Eugene.
Mrs. Esther Johnson Jakway, ’01,
:s at home at 308 East 38th street,
Dortland, Ore.
Katherine Daisy Crawford, B. A.
’06, is living in Portland.
OREGON PREPARES FOR
CHAMPIONSHIP FIGHT
WITH NORTHERN TEAM
HAYWARD S MEN RESTED FROM
W. S. C. GAME AND IN PINK
OF CONDITION
01C. VICTORY BOOSTS OUR PROSPECTS
Defeat of Washington by Aggies
Gives Oregon Higher Northwest
Standing.
Everything is now in readiness for
the two biggest games of the basket
ball season, which are scheduled for
Thursday and Friday night. The en
tire house has been sold out for both
nights, and many late ones are still
clamoring for seats.
Following the two Washington
games in Seattle, the Northern team
has been looked on as well-nigh in
vincible, but two straight defeats, ad
ministered by Dallas and O. A. C. re
spectively, has put an entirely differ
ent light on the matter, while the lat
ter game will give Oregon a lighting
chance for the championship. In case
Washington walks off with the second
Corvallis game, and Oregon can annex
both games here, the pennant will go
to the lemon-yellow five. Otherwise
the honor will lie bewteen the Aggies
and the visiting bunch.
During the W. S. C.-Oregon contest
pulled off here. Hayward’s basket
shooters showed unmistakable signs
of staleness, but a four days rest fol
lowing the game, has remedied that
defect and at present Hayward re
ports the team in first class condition
for the championship struggle.
When the whistle blows, Oregon
will line up with the same team that
starred in the Pullman game, and a
large assortment of second team men
to choose from in case of accidents.
Washington has had a substantial ad
dition to its shooting force since last
semester in Oleson, who starred last
season as a straight-shooting, long
winded forward.
Immediately after the Friday’s
game a dance will De given in the
men’s gym in honor of the winning
team. The affair will be necessarily
short, but will probably be prolonged
enough for those who have taken an
active part in the earlier struggle.
No admission at the dance will be
charged to those who have attended
the game.
FRESHMAN GIRLS DEFEAT
EUGENE HIGH SCHOOL
The Freshman girls defeated the
Eugene High School team at basket
ball Monday afternoon by a score of
27 to 17. The Freshmen put up by
far the better exhibition, although the
High School girls played a hard game.
The greater part of the score was
made on foul throws.
Dr. Stewart and Miss Muir offi
ciated.
The Freshman lineup was: forward,
Edra Moffett (captain), Edna Harvey;
centers, Fairy Leach, May Searay;
guards, Ada Hall, Ruth Sears.
Moda Goldsmith is visiting her cou
sin, Frieda Goldsmith.
Word has been received that Marie
Zimmerman, ex-’13, contracted diph
theria while traveling in California
with her mother.
CHEMISTRY CLUB DISCUSSES
SMOKE IN ITS VARIOUS FORMS
At the meeting of the Chemistry
Club Monday afternoon in McClure
Hall, smoke in all its different phases
was the principle subject discussed.
Prof. Stafford gave an illustrated
lecture on the process of smelting.
Ernest Lamb treated the injurious ef
fects of smelter smoke, while Carrol
Wagner, with Harold Cockerline as
sisting, demonstrated the electrical
precipitation of this smoke. Lyle
Brown discussed the Baghouse meth
od of destroying obnoxious smelter
gases.
The next meeting of the club will
be taken up with Prof. Shinn’s lec
ture on radium.
“Squee” Ramp Is Near Hero.
“Squee” Ramp, ’08, a socialist agi
tator, formerly a prominent Varsity
student, nearly quelled a riot at a re
cent meeting in Portland, where a
socialist crowd took exception to some
remarks made by Gen. Baden-Powell,
concerning the Boy Scout movement.
The crowd, which had constantly in
terrupted the speaker, became riotous
at the close of the meeting, when
“Squee” endeavored to control the I.
W. W.’s and his fellow Socialists, but
he was only partially successful.
Second Annaul Event Expected to
Exceed One of Last fear as All
around Success.
The Second Annual County Fair,
which has been boosted for the last
three months, is scheduled for Satur
day night, March 16, and it is expect
ed to exceed the famous “Mardi Gras”
of last year, as a simultaneous scream
and an all around success.
The fair will be more realistic than
ever with its spielers, confetti, bunco
games, etc.
Posters will appear Thursday, bear
ing a detailed and true account of all
the wonders that are to be had for
the small consideration of 5 and 10
cents, in the line of Dante’s Inferno,
Mutt and Jeff, the roulette wheel, liv
ing statues, streets of Cairo, German
beer garden, chute the chutes, three
ring circus, everybody’s doing it, gay
Paree, an Iggorotte village, and other
attractions too numerous to men
tion.
The Orpheum has not yet an
nounced its program, but it is rum
ored that a slight of hand performer
has been procured, who could make
use of the elusive “pony” under the
most unfavorable conditions. The
minstrel show will be full of spark
ling wit, good music, and local hits.
ANNUAL APRIL FROLIC SET
FOR MARCH THE 29TH
March 29this the date set for the
fifth “April Frolic,” the annual Co-ed
affair. This “suffragette high jinks”
will take place in the men’s gymna
sium, as usual, and every girl in col
lege, and the faculty women as well,
are supposed to appear in some orig
inal and grotesque costume.
Stunts, this year, will be limited
to 12 in number, and to ten minutes
in length. Therefore those who are
to perform, must report as soon as
possible to the committee, Clemen
tine Cutler and Frieda Goldsmith.
Following the vaudeville there will
be dancing and refreshments, which
will end the evening’s fun.
EQUAL SUFFRAGE IS
SAVED BY VOTES OF
WOMEN AND FACULTY
17« OUT OF 300 WOMEN IN THE
UNIVERSITY EXPRESS DESIRE
TO VOTE
48 WOMEN OPPOSE EQUAL SUFFRAGE
Women Favor Honor System and Two
Hour Examination Schedule—
Knife Missouri Grade Idea.
Result of Co-ed vote:
For President—
Theodore Roosevelt .66
Woodrow Wilson .47
W. H. Taft .29
B. Harmon ...
W. J. Bryan .11
Robert M. LaFollette .13
Champ Clark . 3
Eugene V. Debs . 3
Woman’s Suffrage—
Yes . 127
No . 48
Judicial Recall—
Yes . 67
No . 82
Single Tax—
Yes . 62
No . 85
University Examination Honor
System—
Yes .120
No . 45
Compulsory Subscription to
Emerald—
Yes . 95
No . 70
Student Self Government—
Yes .j..144
No .-. 20
Retention of Missouri Grading
System—•
Yes ... 55
No .103
Retention of Two Hour Examina
tion Schedule—
Yes .116
No .—- 55
(By Evans Houston.)
The interest which the women of
the University take in politics was
shown by the fact that one hundred
and seventy-five co-eds out of three
hundred cast their ballots, and
with the assitance of the faculty suc
ceeded in carrying the election for
equal suffrage by a total vote of 257
to 226.
For Presidential nominee, Theodore
Roosevelt was first in the co-ed heart
with 66 votes, Wilson second with 47,
and as no one loves a fat man, Taft
ran a bad third with 29. The rest of
the presidential timber was variously
favored. La Follette, 13, Bryan, 11,
Clark and Debs each got 3. Harmon
was forgotten in the rush.
It was possible to count the co-ed
vote separately, because the promo
tors of the election had the ballots
printed on a different stock of paper.
The men were supplied with ballots
printed on white book paper and the
women were given ballots on ordinary
newspaper stock. The voters were
unable to tell the difference, but the
counters being on the alert, could
readily pick out the feminine ballots.
The faculty vote was placed in a sep
arate box.
The faculty and the men student
voters landed Taft in second place
Continued on page four.