Oregon emerald. (Eugene, Or.) 1909-1920, February 28, 1912, Image 1

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    VOL. XIII.
EUGENE, OREGON, WEDNESDAY. FEBRUARY 28. 1912
No. 34.
APPROACHING TRACK
SEASON BRINGS 01
USUAL SPECULATIONS
ABSENCE OF LOCAL MEETS MAY
PUT DAMPER ON INTEREST
OF TRACK MEN.
OREGON ENTERS TWO PORTLAND MEETS
Unless O. A. C. Comes to Time No
Dual Meets Will Be Held
This Year.
Although the track season is fast
approaching, as' yet there has been
but little interest shown in compari
son with that exhibition in past years.
No new men have signified their in
tention of try ing out for track or
field, although some new material
may appear in the coming indoor
meet, March 23.
In explanation of the present stag
nation in track affairs, Bill Hayward
let out the following information:
“I realize that track is going pretty
slow this year, and in spite of the
fact that a bunch of Oregon’s old
stars, such as Williams, Hawkins and
Kellogg, are still with us, things look
rather discouraging just now. I can
see only one cause for this attitude
among the University men, and that
lies in the fact that the total absence
of local meets in our schedule will
make it difficult for men of medium
ability to participate in varsity con
tests.”
Manager Geary, speaking in de
fense of the 1912 schedule, said:
“Although our plans are not yet
complted, there will probably be no
college meets in Eugene. Under the
condition this season this is unavoid
able.
The Washington meet will naturally
be held in Seattle, as the triangular
meet, with Washington and Oregon
as chief competitors, took place in
Eugene last May. The Northwest
conference meet, scheduled for June
first at Portland, in which all six of
the conference colleges will enter
teams, will be by far the biggest event
of the year and involved too large a
financial risk for any one college to
act as host.
The agreement entered into makes
each college an equal sharer in the
financial outcome of the meet. Port
land has been unanimously chosen by
the graduate manager in preference
to Spokane or Seattle, as the turnout
to the Washington-Oregon football
game has given Portland the reputa
tionof being the best college sport
town in the Northwest.
The other two meets, in which Ore
gon will participate, are the Colum
bia indoor meet. April 13, and the
Berkeley meet, for the first Saturday
in May. With the interscholastic meet
at Eugene on May 11, only one week
end from May 1 till examination is
left unoccupied by a track date in
which Oregon is interested. This is
May 18, the date for try-outs for the
Stockholm games, in which Hawkins,
and possibly Williams, will take part.
The tryouts are to be held in San
Francisco.
It will be impossible to secure any
local dual meets unless O. A. C. can
be prevailed upon to come out against
Oregon in such a contest. Last year
Whitman attempted the nearly impos
sible and arranged for two meets in
the same week with Oregon and 0. A.
C. respectively, and although 0. A. C.
bore half the expenses, Oregon went
S100 in the hole. Judging from last
year’s experience, the cost of bringing
an Inland Empire team to Eugene
alone, would cost Oregon in the neigh
Continued on fourth page.
INFORMAL DANCE SCHEDULED
FOR FRIDAY CALLED OFF
The student body dance, which was
announced for this week-end, has been
called off, as there has been a general
feeling prevalent over the campus that
the dances have been crowded in too
thick and fast lately. However, Man
ager Geary is making arrangements
for a dance to be held March 15. The
dance on that date will be given after
the Washington game and will be held
in honor of the visiting team.
Dancing will begin at 10 o’clock,
and will last until twelve. The fifty
cents tickets will admit one to both
the game and the dance.
The affair will be somewhat of a
novelty, but will be a much needed
improvement, as Oregon has always
been remiss about entertaining visit
ing teams, though it is customary in
other colleges.
W. S. Young, ’98, is a minister at
Roswell, Idaho.
MONTHLY ADOPTS STYLE
February Issue to be “All Story”
Number, and Will Appear
Within Ten Days.
Since the January “all story” num
ber of the Oregon Monthly proved
successful, the editor has decided to
plan the next issue along similar
lines.
The February number, which will
make its appearance within the next
ten days, is to contain several good
articles by some of the varsity’s prom
inent scribes. Esther Grissom is go
ing to bring ont another one of her
live wide-awake stories. This story
is entitled, “One Woman,” and in
volves psychological problems.
Birdie Wise is to present her views
on Equal Suffrage and give her pleas
for the cause. There is also to be an
essay on “Henry Clay.” The Monthly
is considering running a series of ar
ticles on American Statesmen, one
each month. Last month the first one
was published on “Daniel Webster.”
Another article which will possibly
be of undue interest, especially to
those taking the course in Bird Study
this semester, will be “The Rusty
Song Sparrow,” by Earl Stannard.
Mr. Stannard has made a study of
Oregon song birds and is well versed
on their peculiarities.
In addition to these special fea
tures, there will be the usual fund of
poems, jokes, etc. The cover design
of the issue deserves special mention.
It is a very clever sketch, appropriate
for the month, done by Oscar Haugen.
SENIORS WILL MOBILIZE
The much-talked of Senior Smoker
is now an assured fact, the sentiment
of the men of the class being over
whelmingly in favor of the festival, al
though the exact date has not been
set.
The affair will be purely masculine,
and will consist of a dinner at the Ho
tel Osburn, at which the near-grad
uates will eat, drink, and be merry.
Toasts will be responded to by prom
inent members of the class, with Bob
Kellogg, the president, as toastmas
ter.
Ben Chandler is chairman of the
committee having the arrangements
in charge, and he says that the event
will take place within the next month
or six weeks. Details will be per
fected at a meeting of the class to be
held next week. The proposed smoker
is a decided innovation at Oregon, but
the precedent will no doubt be fol
lowed by the senior classes of the
future.
LAWYERS AND MEDICS
PROMISESUPPORTTO
IRIS YEAR’S ANNUAL
EDITOR ONTHANK FINDS SEN
IOR CLASS AT LAW SCHOOL
TO BE LIVE BUNCH
OVER ONE HUNDRED COPIES SPOKEN FOR
Work on '13 Publication Well Under
Way and Classy Book Out On
Time Is Assured.
“The University Law and Medical
Schools are going to support the 1913
Oregana in grand style,” is the report
of Manager Collier and Editor On
thank, who were in Portland last
week.
About a hundred copies have been
signed for so far and many more sub
scriptions are in sight. The Senior
class in the law school held a meeting
last week, at which Editor Onthank
spoke to the lawyers of the big book.
The editor’s persuasive argument had
the desired effect, as the forty-two
members of the class signed in a body.
Judge Gantenbein, dean of the law de
partment, is taking a great interest
in the annual and offered to aid in
every way possible.
The law department will be in
charge of John Schroeder, who was
editor of the O. A. C. Beaver three
years ago. The history of the Senior
class will be written up by C. F.
Hogan, a prominent debater in the
department, while “Beauty” Robison,
of local fame, will look after the in
terests of the Freshmen. Ed|ward A.
Noyes, a senior in the medical school,
has been appointed editor of that sec
tion. He will be assisted by “Bob”
Sharkey, cartoonist. Individual pic
tures of the faculty, seniors, class of
ficers, debaters, and other celebrities,
will also be run.
About fifty pages in all will be de
voted to the Laws and Medics.
Manager Collier says that most of
the Junior and Senior pictures are in
and the cuts are being made in Port
land. Would-be subscribers are urged
to place their names with the man
agement before the present bargain
rate runs out.
DR. BOYD SPEAKS TODAY
The lecture at the Assembly Hour
this morning was delivered by Dr.
Boyd of the First Bresbyterian Church
of Portland.
Dr. Boyd spoke on “The Minister’s
Estimate of His Own Calling,” speak
ing chiefly of the opportunity that a
college man has to use all his talents
in this profession. He pointed out
that this was the only calling, ir
which a man could invest the three
great divisions of his characters: his
mind, his heart, and his executive
ability.
He went on to show the demand foi
intellectual development required b>
the minister, for the complete under
standing of the modern position of re
ligion, since the advent of the scien
tific and social problems of the nine
teenth century. Attention was called
to the extended field calling for the
sympathy of mankind, and it was
shown that the‘minister was the log
ical man to extend the helping hand.
In conclusion Dr. Boyd made clear
that the practical side of administer
was absolutely necessary in order to
run the great machine of the modern
church.
NEW INSTRUCTOR TAKES
DR. BENNETTS PLACE
In the absence of Dr. Bennett, who
has been compelled to give up his
place in the department of education
on account of illness. Dr. George Re
bec, formerly of the University of
Michigan, has been secured.
Dr. Rebec was an instructor in the
department of philosophy and educa
tion at Michigan for a number of
years and has studied both here and
abroad. He was graduated from
Michigan with the class of ’91, and
then took his master’s and doctor’s
degree. He spent one year at the
University of Strassburg and one
year in Italy studying art and the
history of art. He returned to Ann
Arbor and taught for four years,
finally resigning and coming west on
account of his failing health.
He has for the past year been con
ducting a fruit ranch near Medford
and will, on the return of Dr. Bennett,
resume this occupation.
FIRST TRYOUT MARCH 4
Preliminary Contest to Tryout for In
terstate Oratorical Contest Inter
ests Spellbinders.
The initial tryout for the right to
enter the final tryout, from which will
be selected a representative for the
Interstate Oratorical Association, will
be held Monday, March 4. The Asso
ciation is composed of Oregon, Wash
ington and Montana. The contest this
year will take place at Missoula, Mon
tana, sometime in May. The judges
have not yet been selected for the try
out, but will be in the near future.
Many prominent students will take
part in the tryouts. Some of the titles
and contestants include Leon Ray,
’12, who will consider “Men Who Have
Reverted to Type.” Chet Moores, ’12,
has selected Judge George H. Wil
liams, Oregon’s “Grand Old Man.”
“The Unguarded Gates,” which deals
with the immigration problem, will be
considered by Howard Zimmerman,
’13, while a similar question, “Count
ing the Cost,” will be Vincent St.
John’s text. Carlton Spencer, ’13,
will also enter the race.
All those wishing to participate in
the tryouts should hand in the title of
ther oration and their names to some
member of the committee on oratory
and debate. Last year the contest
was won for Oregon ny an unanimous
decision given to Charles Robinson at
Seattle.
C. E. McClure, ’96, is physician and
surgeon at Seattle, Wash.
HUT LEAGUE ELECTS
At the regular meeting of the Inter
Fraternity Athletic League, held last
Wednesday, the officers for this year
were installed. Ben Chandler is presi
dent, Ralph Moores vice-president,
and Tom Word secretary and treas
urer. The offices are held by mem
bers of different fraternity or clubs.
! The order goes in rotation with an an
' nual change, so that each bunch will
i have its turn at every office,
i Copies of the league constitution
were distributed and a tax of ten dol
lars levied on each organization. The
proposed indoor baseball tournament
which has been in the wind for some
time, was quashed, and no games will
be played this year at least.
**********
* The Varsity Canoe Club will *
* hold an important meeting to *
* elect members in Dr. Schmidt’s *
* at 4 o’clock, Thursday. *
**********
OREGON TAKES TWO
EASY GAMES FROM
GEM STATE TEAM
IDAHO PLAYERS BEWILDERED
BY TEAM WORK OF VARSITY
BASKET TOSSERS
COACH RECOGNIZED OREGON'S STRENGTH
Washington and Oregon Expected to
Run Close Race for Champion
ship Honors.
The Varsity tossers opened the in
tercollegiate season on the home
floor by downing the University of
Idaho five in two games. Monday
■night the Oregon team got the long
end of a 31 to 8 score and last night
turned the trick again, annexing 36
to the Gem Stater’s 10.
Both games were slow and at no
time did the Idaho men have a chance
of even tieing the score. Fenton and
Capt. Jamison were the heavy point
scorers for the Varsity and devided
the honors about evenly. The feature
of the second game was the basket
contributed to Oregon by Perkins, the
Idaho guard. Perkins got his wires
crossed and threw a pretty basket for
Oregon from near the middle of the
floor.
Members of the Idaho team during
their recen visit, asserted that the
Oregon quintet was the strongest and
possessed the most dangerous attack
of any team in the conference.
“Pink” Griffiith, coach of the organ
ization which left for Corvallis this
morning, said before leaving Eugene:
“I predict that Oregon will defeat the
University of Washington in the two
games scheduled for March 14 and 15
at Eugene, and O. A. C. will get at
least one game from the U. of W.
team in the two contests at Cor
vallis.”
Speaking of the Washington vs.
Oregon games, Coach Griffith had this
to say, “Oregon has the edge on
Washington in throwing baskets and
in the feeding at the basket. But
when it comes to work or getting the
ball near to the basket, I think Wash
ington is stronger than Oregon.”
If Coach Griffith’s prediction comes
true and Oregon wins two straight
from Washington, it will be up to
Washington to either accept mana
ger Geary’s proposal to play an extra
game in Portland or Eugene to
decide the Northwest championship,
or give up any claim that they may
have.
CROCKETT GOES TO PENDLETON
FOR RELIEF OF INJURED KNEE
Peter C. Crockett, ’14, member of
Oregon’s defeated debating team, left
for his home in Pendleton, Saturday
morning at 2:37.
Crockett injured his knee in a bas
ketball scrimmage a week previous to
the debate, and although “water on
1 the knee” developed, he stuck gamely
1 to his debate work. The injured mcm
, her was treated by “Bill” Hayward
with the usual remedies, but it failed
to respond. On the day of the debate,
the knee was subjected to a X-ray ex
amination, which disclosed a condition
that demanded quick action, or threat
ened blood poison, so an operation to
I remove the pus and to scrape the
| affected bone was deemed necessary.
“Pete,” who is now at his home in
Pendleton, will not return to college
this semester, unless the operation is
highly successful.
Mrs. Emmerick is visiting her
daughter, Aletha, at the Theta House.
The Delta Sigma fraternity enter
tained on Saturday evening with a
I dance at the house.