Oregon emerald. (Eugene, Or.) 1909-1920, February 24, 1912, SPECIAL Y. M. C. A. EDITION, Image 9

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TOGGERY
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JACK^AGE, Proprietor.
644 Willamette Street.
JHE CLUB
[BER SHOP
Student Trade Appreciated
BERT VINCENT Proprietor
Wing's Market
THE 1KMIE OF GOOD MEATS
AND ^JfcOCERIES. . FRESH
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ED MEATS. SAUSAGES AND
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Phone 88
487 Willamette
MARION F.KEEYS TALKS
TOTHEY. M.C.A. MEN
Returned Misisonary Tells men of
Present Day Conditions In the
New China.
One of the most vivid and interest
ing lectures of the year was heard by
the men of the University at the Y.
M. C. A. meeting on Thursday even-,
ing. Mr. Marion F. iveeys spoke for
three-quarters of an hour on the
evolution and present condition of
China. A large crowd was present
and many are the praises that are
being heard of the lecture.
Mr. Keeys spoke from personal as
sociation with Chinese affairs. He
came from Canton, China, only four
months ago, and was able to fill his
talk with vivid examples and illustra
tions.
He traced briefly the political de
velopment of the Chinese from the
self satisfied stagnation of a few
years ago to the radical, revolution- j
ary period of today. He said that j
the changes of today have been grad- |
ually coming for a long time, but they
have come to stay. The Chinese are;
a very conservative people, but, when
convinced that anything is good, they
can be depended upon to accept it.
Mr. Keeys has great faith in the fu
ture of China. The character of the
people, and the wonderful resources
of the country combine, he says, to
make what will doubtless be one of
the great world powers of the future.
He believes that the awakening oi
China has been due more to the pres
ence of the Christian missionary than
to any other one thing. It was from
them that the Chinese statesmen of
today received their education. It
was they who gave the whole nation
her lasting impression of the super
iority of western civilization. Many
of the modern leaders of China, in
cluding Dr. Sun Yat Sen, the revolu
tionary president, are avowed Chris
tians.
Mr. Keeys impressed his audience
with his story of the statesmanship
of the Christian forces in China. He
showed how great commercial enter
prises are copying their methods for
promoting their business. He recom
mended the study of Chinese affairs
to all who,are interested in either po
litical, social, or religious growth.
Mr. Keeys also urged enrollment in
the class which the local Y. M. C. A.
is organizing for the study of John
R. Mott’s book, “The Decisive Hour
of Christian Missions.” This, he says,
is a masterpiece of Christian states
manship.
Good music and an interesting
speaker combined served to make one
of the most appreciated meeting of
the year.
Emerald subscriptions are now due.
Kindly pay them to Allyn Roberts,
Walter Dobie, or Clay Watson.
0.
TALKS TO COLLEGE
MEN MARCH 1, 2, 3
SPEAKER IS SECOND ON LA’ TO
JOHN R. MOTT AS STUDENT
Y. M. C. A. LEADER
WAS GRADUATED FROM MICHIGAN 1900
Mr. Hurrey Has Visited All Important
Countries of Europe, Asia and
South America.
(By Charles W. Koyl.)
Too much cannot be said in favor of
the man who has come across the con
tinent to address the students of Ore
gon; Charles D. Hurrey, of New York
City, International Y. M. C. A. Secre
tary.
Last year we had with us E. C.
Carter and E. C. Mercer, but this year
we are fortunate in having with us
Mr. Hurrey, who has taken the place
of Mr. Mercer, he having resigned to
go back to his great Association work
in India.
Mr. Hurrey is a much stronger and
more pleasing speaker than Mr. Mer
cer. He favors to a great extent, the
eminently pleasing and powerful
characteristics of Gypsy Smith, as a
leader and speaker. Like Gypsy
Smith, Mr. Hurrey is a speaker who
keeps perfectly sweet and sensible
and is fluent and gracious in all that
he says and does, asking no questions
to particularly embarress his aud
ience; and yet presenting his wealth
of knowledge and wisdom in a
straightforward, manly fashion. You
will like him, men; and he will like
you. He is coming to the campus to
help you.
Mr. Charles 1). Hurrey. atter grad
uating from the University of Michi
gan in 1900, became State Student
Secretary of the Young Men’s Chris
tian Association in Michigan. After
making good in this field of endeavor,
Mr. Hurrey attended the World’s
Student Federation Conference in
Tokyo, and subsequently toured Ja
pan, China, and the Phillippines, af
ter which he attended the British
Volunteer Convention in Liverpool in
January, 1908, followed by an ex
tended visit to the leading colleges
and universities of England and Scot
land. He then spent ten days in Pa
ris and later lived three months in
Spain and Portugal.
For the past three years Mr. Hur
rey has had charge of the Association
work in South America, being offi
cially known there as the Continental
Secretary of the Young Men’s Chris
tian Association. While in this inter
esting country, Mr. Hurrey visited
the leading cities of Brazil, Argen
tina, Uruguay, Chili, Peru, Bolivia,
and Paraguay; and during his jour
neys he had the privilege of meeting
personally, the presidents of three re
publics, and coming in contact with
the leading educators and government
representatives.
Last June Mr. Hurrey was present
at the World’s Missionary Conference
at Edinburgh and traveled through
Germany, Holland, and Belgium.
Since that time he has been on the
International Executive Committee
with Mr. John R. Mott, the chair
man.
GERMAN CLUB ANNOUNCES
PLAY FOR THIS SEMESTER
Two German plays will be present
ed by the German Club during the
coming semester, one of which will
be given soon in Villard Hall, and the
other one later, possibly on the cam
pus lawn.
The play which will propably be
given first is entitled “Jugend Liebe.”
Statistics at the end of the first
semester at Stanford show a marked
increase in enrollment and scholar
ship over that of last year. The en
rollment at the southern institution
now is 1478.
Sixty-three students were graduat
ed at the end of the first semester at
Stanford University.
F. E. DU N N
575 WILLAMETTE STREET
Just received our spring line of
Suits, Shoes and Shirts
200 Suits in grays, browns, and blues, latest and best patterns.
Shoes of newest and classiest shapes, for ladies and gentlemen.
Shirts of new stripes and patterns, with all the newest collars
and cuffs.
A call to see our Spring Merchandise will convince you.
575 F. E. DUNN 557
ORATORICAL CONTEST
AT FOREST GROVE
On March 8th, David Pickett Will Up
hold the Honor of Oregon at
Annual Contest.
The University will meet the other
colleges of Oregon in the annual in
ter-collegiate oratorical contest on
March 8. Orators representing the
eight institutions of higher learning
of Oregon will meet at Pacific Univer
sity at Forest Grove to contend for
the medal awarded to the best college
orator in Oregon. This event is one
of considerable interest, especially in
many of the smaller schools where
athletics does not play an important
part. It is the great event looked for
ward to during the entire year, and
enthusiasm runs high as the date of
the contest approaches.
Oratory is the only form of activ
ity in which the colleges of Oregon
meet on an equal footing. The place
of contest is chosen by rotation, each
institution being the meeting place
once in eight years. Eight student
delegates and a faculty member ac
company the orator of each school.
During the afternoon preceding the
contest the oratorical association holds
its regular annual business meeting.
The association consists of the as
sembled delegates, making a legisla
tive body of sixty-four members,
which passes rules regulating the con
tests, and elects officers for the com
ing year. After the contest the great
annual banquet is held. The visiting
delegates are the guests of the local
college, and each in its turn attempts
to outdo the other institution in cor
diality and hospitality. At this ban
quet a chosen member from each dele
gation responds to a toast. These
speeches often rival in interest the
orations themselves.
In recent years Oregon has won the
championship in two instances. First
place was won for Oregon by Bert
Prescott in 1908 and by Carlton Spen
cer in 1911. This year David Pickett
will represent Oregon with his oration
on “The Modern Paradox.” The fight
promises to be closely contested, and
collegians all over the State of Ore
gon are following the event with in
terest.
NOTICE Y. W. C. A!
Special Meetings.
Saturday, March 2, 7:30—Student
Mass Meeting. Speakers, Miss Eliza
beth Fox, Mr. Hurrey. College Sing.
Yillard Hall.
Sunday, March 3, 9:30 A. M.—
Jdeeting for Girls. Speaker, Mr. Hur
rey. iGirls’ Gymnasium.
Monday, March 4, 4 P. M.—Meet
ing for Girls. Speaker, Miss Eliza
beth Fox, iGrls’ Gymnasium.
NEW
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WEAVES
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505 Willamette St.
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Grateful for Student Patronage
F. BERRY
$10 Suit House
Outfitters of Men and Boys
Men’s All Wool Suits
$10 to $25
Sixth and Willamette