Oregon emerald. (Eugene, Or.) 1909-1920, October 23, 1909, Image 4

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    Irani
Society Brand and
L System Clothes
are the correct clothes for you as they are dignified yet stylish and have a certain hang and snap about
them that distinguishes the fellow who wears them from the one who don’t.
THE NEW L SYSTEM Coats are made to appeal to the college fellow who wants something
different, by having a broad military shoulder and loose, easy hang, while the trousers are made big
and peggy.
THE NEW SOCIETY BRAND CLOTHES are classy, yet dignified; coats made plain, but
with sharp, clear lines. The patented “PERMANENT CREASE” in all Society Brand trousers
appeals to yaung fellows.
Correct College Clothes
.S'15.00 to $40.00
Correct Kvening Clothes
Blue Serges, Blacks, Blue Blacks, and Dark Worsteds in large variety of styles and qualities,
as well as
Full Dress and Tuxedo Suits
made by people who know tailoring as an art.
Evening Clothes $20 to $60
Overcoats and Raincoats in all new models and
every late fabric,
Your Clothes Pressed Once a Week for One Year by Fine Experienced Tailor Absolutely Free
S. H. FRIENDLY
COLLEGE CLOTHIER, HATTER AND FURNISHER
JAMISON ARRANGES
BASEBALL SCHEDULE
It’s ;i long look ahead to the spring
baseball season, but Manager Jamison
I elieves in taking time by the forelock
and has already made preir,rations for
vvbat should be the lest season of the
national game Op'g.m has eve.- seen.
Some of the bright prospects he is
holding before the Oregon ro.vers arc
as follows: Probabilities of trips to
lapan, California and Inland Umpire,
the best coach on the coast and loss
of only two men, Lee third md ( ole
man. Besides, there is , wealth of
new material in school with prospects
of several more men entering in Febru
ary.
Of course, the biggest thing is the
Japan trip. Manager Jamison snvs that
the trip is not yet assured but that lie
is doing all possible and hopes to land
it late in the season. A California
trip is practically arranged for. This
will include games with Southern Ore
gon teams on the way down to San
b'raucisco where they will play St. Ig
natius, California and Stanford. Nego
tiations tire on for games with the
Southern California teams, as Santa
Clara, St. Vincents and Cniversitv of
Southern California. It will be a long
jump from San Francisco,, however,
and this part of the trip is doubtful.
The Inland Kmpire trip will be taken
again tmd this year will include U.. of
W. and Spokane teams Manager Jam
ison is making efforts to include Vic i
toria and Vancouver on this trip, which
will probably occur in the spring vaca
tion.
"Father Tom" will arrive early in
March and '-tart work immediately.
I bis year be will have a line on the men
and will not need so much time for
tryouts. The battery cages will be put
up again on the campus diamond but
the games \ ill probably be played on
CLASSICAL DRAMA
FOR SENIOR PLAY
It is probable that the senior class
ibis year will Rive a classical play for
their annual affair. Professor Glen is
in favor of the idea, and, although the
class lias expressed no opinion, he is
on the lookout for a suitable one in
case they should favor the plan.
A real classical play has never been
given at the University of Oregon.
I'our years ago the senior class pre
sented Pygmalion and Galatea, which
has a classical subject but is not a true
classical play. Professor Glen believes
that a real classical play would be
something new and would prove a
great attraction.
Oliver Huston, president of the class,
has appointed Ralph Dodson, Frances
Oberteuffer and Louis Pinkham on the
committee to make arrangements for
the play. It is the intention if possi
ble to give it during the first semester
and thus use the proceeds to pay part
of the deficit on the Junior Annual.
Fred Ohrt, a former University of
i Iregon student, is making good at
Cornell. He has a chance at first place
in the pole vault, having vaulted 11 feet
last year, lie is also on the civil en
gineering staff, which is an esteemed
position.
the old professional grounds, thus
avoiding any friction between track
and baseball. Kelly likes it here and
writes that he is anxious to get back
An effort will be made this year to
have organized rooting at the games.
"Baseball," says Manager Jamison,
"really arouses more enthusiasm than
track athletics and with the number of
good campus games the rooters should
take it up seriously."
FEW CHANGES YET IN
FOOTBALL SITUATION
The only development of importance
in tlie football dtuation this week has
been the shifting of Captain Clarke to
quarterback to fill the place caused by
Chandler being forced to leave the squad
on account of getting behind in his
studies. The practice game scheduled
for this afternoon, however, is expect
ed to result in more definite selection of
those who are to have positions on the
first team.
Hayward has tightened up on the
men and hereafter they must be at
home by nine and in bed by ten. There
has been one infraction of the rule, the
offender being punished by being asked
to turn his suit in. Trainer Hayward
expresed his regret at being compelled
to take such action but said it was
necessary to keep up the discipline and
that any one on the squad from the
captain down might know' what to ex
pect for violation of the training rules.
Twelve men are now eating at the
training table. They are: Clarke, Pink
ham, Main, Michael, Kiltz, Dodson,
Hickson, Gillis, Mitchell, Taylor, La
tourette and Walker.
Since the wet weather, bucking has
been harder and the plays go off with
snap and precision.
Clarke, Walker and Taylor have been
playing the hacks and work exception
ally well togeth *.
The seniors majoring in the Depart
ment of Kconomics are examining crit
ically the new projects for remodelling
the state constitution suggested by W.
S. U'Ren, the well known originator
of the Initiative and Referendum in
Oregon.
Arthur Van Dusen, ex-’lO, is attend
ing the Northwestern University at Chi
cago.
THE C. E. SCOTT CO.
UNIVERSITY TEXT BOOKS AND SUPPLIES
PENNANTS AND BIGGEST LINE OF POST CARDS IN THE CITY
OPTICAL AND JEWELRY DEPARTMENTS
Are in charge of a registered graduate Optician and a competent Jeweler.
537 Willamette St. Phone Main 546.
CHAMPIONSHIP TO BE
RAISED FROM 38 TO 40
“The whole golf course is going to
K remarked and made more difficult.’'
said Professor Dearborn, the president
of the Golf Club yesterday. Besides
lengthening the course somewhat, a
number of the holes will be changed
and made more difficult by placing
bunkers around them.
The experts say that this rebuilding
will make it so much more difficult that
the “Bogey" of the course will be
raised from 38 to 40.
Many students have joined the club
and golfing promises to be a popular
sport this winter. The fine weather
the last of the wek has been made
the most of by several parties.
FIRST MEETING OF
FACULTY COLLOQUIUM
The faculty colloquium will meet for
the first time this year, Tuesday night
in McClure Hall. Professor Dunn will
read a paper on “Art as an Education.”
The Colloquium is a club started last
year among the faculty that proved a
decided success. Some member reads
a paper at each meeting, to which the
general public is invited.
Seth Kerron, ’06, has located in
, Tillamook to practice med’cine.
GYM. NAME IN DOUBT
UNTIL NEXT YEAR
The decision of the Board of Re
gents is still, to a certain extent, a
matter of conjecture, as regard the res
olution passed by the student body at
its recent meeting, strongly favoring
"Hayward Hall” as the name for the
new gymnasium—in compliment to Bill
Hayward, the trainer that puts out win
ning athletic teams for the University
of Oregon. It is not known definitely
how soon the regents will take action
on the matter, but is probable that it
will not be finally decided until the reg
ular meeting of the Board on Tuesday,
January 18.
ASSEMBLY SCHEDULE
NOT YET COMPLETE
The schedule for speakers at the stu
dent assemblies although still far from
complete, has been filled out for the
most of the dates up to the time of the
Christmas holidays. President Camp
bell will deliver an address before the
assembly on Wednesday, October 27,
and the following partial schedule has
been arranged for ensuing dates:
Nov. 3—Mr. Terrill, of the Y. M.
C. A.
Nov. 10—Not yet filled.
Nov. 17—Professor Young.
Nov. 24—Thanksgiving holiday.
Dec. 1—Professor Glen.