The news-review. (Roseburg, Or.) 1948-1994, April 28, 1959, Page 3, Image 3

Below is the OCR text representation for this newspapers page. It is also available as plain text as well as XML.

    House Passes, Sends To Senate
Road, Welfare Spending Bills
SALEM (AP) Bills to spend'
$196,934,000 or highways and 91 1
million dollars lor public welfare j
in the two-year period beginning
next July 1 were passed by the I
House Monday and sent to the j
Senate. '
Th highway figure, 20 per cent!
more than that being spent in the
current bienmum, includes 99 mil
lion dollars in federal funds. j
In addition, the Legislature pre-:
viousiy voicn million dollars in
bonds to build the Columbia River
bridge at Astoria and improve the
Roseuurg-Coquille Highway.
The welfare program calls for
S3fi.6U0.000 in stale funds, the rest
contributed by the federal govern
ment and counties.
The total welfare program is
about seven . million more than
that of the present biennium.
The House also sent to the Sen
ate a $200,000 emergency welfare
appropriation to finish out the
present two years. This is in ad
dition to Sl.20U.uou voien earner.
Approval of the $200,000 means
the commission will be able to
maintain old age assistance and
aid to the blind and disabled at
present standards, but it will
have to trim nursing home care
and other programs.
The House approved 36-21 and
sent to the governor a bill to
eliminate unemployment benefits
for 'manv seasonal workers.
The bill will reduce the jobless
Senate Committee Leaves
College Money Bill Intact
SALEM (AP) The 55 million
dollar appropriation for higher ed
ucation was left intact Monday
by the Senate State and Federal
Affairs Committee.
The committee voted 4-2 to send
the bill, which increases the ap
propriation by 17 per cent over
this biennium, back to the Sen
ate floor after Senate President
Walter J. Pearson (D-Portland)
referred it to the committee last
week.
Normally, appropriation bills
approved by the joint Ways and
Alcans Committee are not sent to
other committees.
Pearson said, however, he gave
the House-approved budget to the
State and federal Affairs Com
mittee because of opposition in
the Senate to the increase.
Pearson said he did not like the
11 per cent hike in faculty sal
aries provided for the next two
years.
Committee members indicated
Jlonday they did not feel they
coutd make a quick cut in tne
budget after the Ways and Means
Committee had worked three
months on it.
The two votes against the meas
ure were cast by Sens. Boyd Over
Jiulse (D-Madras), chairman of
the committee, and R. F. Chap
man (D-Coos Bay).
The four for it were Sens. Harry
Boivin (D-Klamath Falls), Jean
Lewis (D-Portland), Carl Fran
cis (R-Dayton), and Dan Thiel
(D-Astoria).
Sen, Lewis, chairman of Hie
ways and means subcommittee
which worked on the higher edu
cation budget, called the salary
increase justified and necessary
"to attract top people in the top
fields.!'
Faculty salaries would be in
creased seven per cent the first
year and four per cent the sec-
! ond.
The three million dollars in
! volved in the increase would be
j divided into four per ? cent for
across - the - board increases and
seven per cent for merit raises.
, benefit claims about 10 per cent,
disqualifying 40 per cent of the
! cannery workers.
! To qualify for benefits under
i the measure, a worker must work
1 20 weeks during a year. The
House defeated a Labor and In
dustries Coinniittea majority rec
ommendation that the require
ment be cut to 18 weeks.
A House-passed bill to elimi
nate installment payments on in
come taxes, expected to net eight
million in added revenue in the
next biennium, was changed by
the Senate Taxation Committee.
The committee amended the
bill by keeping installment pay
ments, but charging six per cent
annual interest on them.
If the committee action should
be accepted, then about six mil
lion would have to be obtained
from some other source.
The committee hopes to take
action quickly on its proposals to
broaden the base of the income
tax by adding low income groups
to those affected by the tax.
It could not act Monday be
cause it did not have the figures
it requested of the state Tax
Commission.'.
OSMOSE
EIRE POSTS
m. LAST,
3 TO 5 1
TIMES
LONGER
Ooai be commit
ty fcoftuiriff fences!
Put rhem up to av!
O&mow -fence -fb&ft
tre oedMd to rant all
forms of oc and let
mttet. Hwy re htt to
ntttc,oo
COEN
Supply Co;
'Everything for the builder"
Flood and MMI Sr.
Phone OR 3-4461
1
Iff
Research Lab Asked
For Sea Experiment
I WASHINGTON (AP) Rep.
j Thomas M. Pelly (R-Wash) Tues-
ciay urgea approval or nis Dill to
authorize construction of a salt
water research laboratory at Se
attle. In a statement prepared for (he
house fisheries subcommittee, the
Seattle Congressman said the proj
ect would be built in conjunction
with an aquarium proposed by the
city at Golden Gardens beach.
Operation of the laboratory
would be conducted jointly by the
State Department of Fisheries, the
oceanography and fisheries col
leges of the University of Wash
ington, and the Fish and Wildlife
Service.
Pelly said he was advised last
year by Ross Leffler, assistant
secretary of interior for fish and
wildlife, that the project would fill
a need in the Puget Sound region
to the ultimate benefit of the food
and sports fisheries of the Pacific
Northwest and Alaska.
Estimated cost of the project, he
said, was $650,000.
Pelly told the subcommittee he
hoped the project could be built
in time for the Century 21 world
exposition opening in Seattle in
1961.
Governor Tabs
Rights As Basic
' PORTLAND (AP)-Civil lights
are the "basic human rights of
individuals," Gov. Mark Hatfield
told the annual meeting of the
Urban League of Portland.
The passing of laws to assure
equality is not enough, he said.
"What the people think will be
the real measure of civil rights
in Oregon," the governor said.
He listed four improvements
needed in Oregon:
Economics, social relationships,
politics and spiritual.
On economics, he said:
"Employment is the key of the
matter and there is a great deal
of work to be done here. We must
continue to press forward in jobs
and equality in labor unions. A
man should be judged on his abil
ity and merit."
On social relationships:
"Every time we talk of social
relationship this question comes
up: 'Do you mean intermarriage?
. . . Intermarriage is the privilege
of the individual. People should
have the right to make their own
friendships, work together and go
to church together. You do not
isolate groups in housing or other
areas."
On politics:
"It is awfully easy for us to
look down into Mississippi! and
say, 'Well, thank God, that can't
happen in Oregon.' When we sav
things like this, we're guilty of
putting civil rights into little tight
categories. We must utilize the
total thinking process of our
people to solve this problem."
On spiritual:
"How in the world anyone can
call himself spiritual and not he
concerned with the total welfare
of his fellow man is beyond me."
State Building
Bonds Asked
SALEM (AP) - A 40 million,
dollar bonding program for state
building construction was ap
proved Monday by the Joint Ways
and Means Committee.
The measure will go to a vote
of the people in 1960 if the legis
lation gets past both houses.
Each Legislature would allocate
funds for construction hut could
not send more than 15 million
dollars in any one biennium. The
bonding program, which would
expire in 1971, is for higher edu
cation, slate institutions and Capi
tol area construction.
Three members of the commit
tee voted against the measure
Reps. Stafford llansell (H
Athena). W. S. Chadwick (R Sa
loin I, and George Annala (D-llood
River).
llansell said if the funds are
needed they should lie allocated
now instead of bonding for the
buildings. Annala called it "post
poning the time to meet an obli
gation" and warned that it will
cost more in the end.
In addition to the long range
bonding program, the joint com
mittee approved $4 .470.000 from
the general fund for higher educa
tion construction for the next two
years.
It also approved introduction of
legislation for $5,600,000 in revenue
bonds to finance projects, includ
ing a S1.705.UOO addition to the
University of Oregon science
building.
The revenue bonds would be fi
nanced by student fees.
The committee delayed action
on $2,881,564 for buildings at the
state institutions.
Free Admission Planned At Zoo
PORTLAND (AP) The Port
hind City Council is working on
an ordinance to provide free ad
mission to the new Portland Zoo
on Wednesdays.
under also would be admitted
without charge.
Otherwise admission would be
35 cents fur persons 16 and over,
Fathers Given Break
SALEM (AP) Fathers involved
in divorce actions would get a
break under a bill passed by the
House Monday and sent to the
Senate.
Under the bill, judges in divorce
suits would award custody of the
children to whichever parent
could do the best job of raising it.
Under the present system, a
father generally has to prove the
mother is unfit in order to win
custody.
Fund-Raising
Licenses Vetoed
SALEM (AP) A bill to require
fund-raising organizations to be
licensed and regulated by the sec
retary of state or county clerks
failed by a single vote Monday
to win House approval.
The vote was 30 to 27, but 31
votes were required to carry the
bill.
Rep. Vernon Cook (D-Trout-dale)
told the House the bill
would assure contributors to char
itable, religious and educational
organizations go where it is in
tended to go.
$4250 Webster's new
Twentieth Century
Dictionary Set
with the purchase of anew EASY 3aeWWt
AUTOMATIC WASHER
k Two Volumes. ..Unabridged
You Mv, Hme . . . .rept with these Handsomely Bound
yean-ahead EAST features:
1 ic 2304 Pages
ej Cycle StUctiont e3 Waih Wottc Tftmptraturet , -, , , ,
et.clu.iv. easy Spirolo.or e2 Wo,h, 2 Spin sPd. Newly Revleed...Up.To-Date
Tip-Top Filttr 1 Rinx WoUr Temperoturti -fr Rich Maroon Oold Stamped
e Variable Load Siia Selector
k Nearly 400,000 Words Defined
BUY NOW Get both
Easy Automatic Washer
and Free Gift, Only
2.97
Her
Week
ACT NOW! LIMITED OFFER!
KIER-CROOCH
PLUMBING AND APPLIANCE CO.
"For Better Living"
528 S. E. Stephens St. Phone OR 2-3364
Free Parking South Side of Building
Parent-Teacher Confab
Under Way At Corvallis
CORVALL1S, Ore. (API Dele
gates at the Oregon Congress of
Parents and Teachers meeting
here swing today into their initial
business sessions.
Some 900 arrived Monday night,
and the total was expected to
swell to nearly 1,200.
At a pre-convention meeting
Monday night the Congress' hoard
ot managers agreed to recom
mend delegates vote Medford the
1960 convention site.
The presidenlial nominee for
the congress is Mrs. Leight Gustl
son of Medford.
School groups would he admitted and 20 cents for persons under 16.
free on any day. Children 5 and 'The zoo is to open June 10.
Tuo., April 28, 1959 The Newi-Review, Roteburg, Ore. 3
Jail Costs Inflated
SAI.KM. Ore. (AP) The bur-ltatives passed and sent to the Sen
(I on inflation casts on the county ate a bill to allow prisoners to
jail prisoner was recognized here 'serve fines at the rate of $5 a day
Monday. ! rather than the present $2 a day
The Oregon House of Represent rale.
feNNY BROOK
(The Great Whiskey of the Old West
- ,' v v
West :-:;-. P-AJ .
"rex
11
4r
wll
TAKE YOUR
CHOICE
hi A
A M ' ' ' - f - I W.NN.N.TrH.W.-.Tl M
i I ' itS ' -i ! I .imHis Jmnicm ?VJ
f W 'I4 e,S erli,t-TA,ic I '
1 I SUNNY
f ';;"'rr;H BROOK
SO PROOF ILINDID
TWAIOMT , WHISKEY
W7
WW
$2.90 54-4R $2.90
pi 1 ft nf A ft ('.
"A OA3H FOR TIMBER
HY THIS CHEAT KENTUCKY
WHISKEY COMES IN TWO BOTTLINGS!
There are two great tastes in American whiskey. Some
people prefer blends. Others like straight bourbon. Sunny
Brook the great whiskey of the Old West offers you
both with every drop Kentucky whiskey. Follow your taste.
Choosethe round bottle blend or the square bottle straight.
THE OLD SUNNY BROOK CO., LOUISVILLE, KY., DISTRIBUTED BY NATIONAL DISTILLERS PRODUCTS COMPANY. KENTUCKY
STRAIGHT BOURBON WHISKEY, 90 PROOF . KENTUCKY BLENDED WHISKEY. 8$ PROOF 65X BRAIN NEUTRAL SPIRIT
'
The Impola i-Door apon Coupe unrntsiakably '69 m every modern line.
if 'fH ( Chevy, of course )
(like nn other car around )
(you couldn't want a car worth more)
Now thanks to what Chevy
wraps into one sweet low-priced
package there's no reason to
compromise between the car
you've always wanted and the
one you can afTord. '
Even as it sits in your dealer's
showroom this new Chevrolet
shows its worth in wonderful new
ways the fresh cut of its silhou
ette, the clean sweep of its new
areas of visibility, the luster of
its longer lasting finish. And a
look inside reveals the roominess
of its new Body by Fisher, the
tasteful way its upholstery ex
tends snug to the windows, even
the convenience of crank-oper
ated ventipanes. But the real
clincher will come out on the road
when you feel for yourself Chevy's
cream-smooth ride, its sure
gripping Safety-Master brakes,
its cocked-pistol reflexes.
The plain truth is, a visit with
your Chevrolet dealer has never
been so worth your while.
For a "Spring Sales Spectacular" deal see your local authorized Chevrolet dealer!
, ' , - -
HANSEN MOTOR COMPANY
OAK AND STEPHENS ROSEBURG ORchard 34446