The news-review. (Roseburg, Or.) 1948-1994, May 10, 1949, Page 4, Image 4

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4 Th Nwi-RYlw, Roteburg, Ore. Tue., May 10, 1949
, " Published Dally Except Sunday by th
News-Review Company, Inc.
CHARLES V. STANTON pp, EDWIN L. KNAPP
Editor Manager
Member of tha Aaaoolatad Preaa, Oragon Newspaper Publiehere
Aaaoolatlon, tha Audit Bureau of Clroulatlona
niMlel br WEST-HOLIIDAT CO., INC.. efllui In Naw Tork, Cllo.ia,
1DB CaUrTION BATES 111 Os.gan Br M.ll Fae ' M M' !i?tLAit
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SANITARY IMPROVEMENTS
Anyway, It's A Good Start
By CHARLES V. STANTON
Although the City of Myrtle Creek Is in ths doghouse
because it is laggard in making plans for sewage disposal,
other Douglas County municipalities are well advanced with
sanitary plans and, in general, are far ahead of the state
average, according to Claude Baker, county sanitary en
gineer
Myrtle Creek, it is reported in a bulletin issued by the
State Board of Health, ignored a request that it appear at
a public hearing in Portland recently, where six cities and
three industrial plants were represented, and where warn
ing was issued that legal action may be used to enforce
anti-pollution laws. The State Sanitary Authority has cited
Myrtle Creek to appear at a hearing July 22.
Municipalities which lack sewage disposal facilities are
being required by the State Sanitary Authority to submit
specific time schedules for constructing and financing sew
age treatment plants. At the same time the Authority is
tightening its demands on industrial installations. Paper
mills, dumping such large quantities of waste into the Wil
lamette River that the oxygen content is reduced to zero
during periods of low water, are extremely reluctant to
install anti-pollution equipment, claiming that they had
"been unable to find a satisfactory solution to the problem
which would be economic." Laboratory reports show that
industrial waste from paper mills can be eliminated, but
installations are costly and mills are reluctant to add this
cost to their operating expense.
Anti-pollution sentiment is growing rapidly in Oregon.
Destruction of fish life, streams rendered unsafe for recre
ational' purposes, impairment of scenic beauty and hazards
to health have caused widespread demand for a speed-up of
the state's anti-pollution campaign.
The State Sanitary Authority has been quite mild in its
enforcement policies until recently and has been trying to
secure improvement of conditions through cooperation
rather than by force. But in recent months it has become a
little more threatening and appears to mean business.
The Authority is working on a double-barreled program.
First emphasis is placed on adequate water supply. Second
in Importance is sanitation and sewage disposal. Municipali
ties are required to keep the agency informed on plans and
progress relative to these projects.
The City of Roseburg was one of the first Oregon munici
palities to install complete sewage disposal facilities. Riddle
is believed to be Oregon's smallest municipality with a full
treatment plant a plant built cooperatively by the city and
the Harbor Plywood Company. Kiddles disposal unit is
nearing completion and will be in operation in the near
future.
Extensive plans are being made for improved sanitation
in the suburban areas of Roseburg. North Riverside Addi
tion is completing work on Its project planning and will
advertise bonds after the new state law becomes effective
in July. The new law authorizes the state treasurer to buy
district bonds. Tentative plans for a sanitary district are
being made in West Roseburg. The Veterans Facility will
either join with North Riverside in putting in sewage dis
posal facilities or Install its own plant. The community east
of Roseburg is proposing annexation and is circulating
petitions.
Reedsport is improving its water system, extending sewer
lines, and is plnnning a disposal plant. Drain has completed
engineering for a disposal plant and is preparing to submit
a proposed bond issue to a vote of the residents. Oakland
and Sutherlin are working on disposal plant designs. .
Canyonville is in a very fortunate spot. It recently nego
tiated sale of timber from its watershed, raising thereby
about $90,000 which will go into installation of sanitary
facilities. Glendale is extending its water system and has
tentative plans for sewage disposal.
The county sanitarian is well pleased with the cooperation
"and interest shown by Douglas County municipalities in
sewage disposal planning, he reports. He is finding some
difficulty, however, in getting cooperation from private
home owners with poor sanitation outside organized areas.
He reports he has been in consultation with state and county
authorities and a "crack-down" is in prosj?ct on some of
the uncooperative violators.
-0
hi
By Vmhnelt S. Martin
Editorial Comment
From The Oregon Press
DAMS AND FISH
The Dalles Chronicle
Oregon has learned from repeat
ed experience, Including Inst
week's hearings before the Hy
droelectric Commission on the
Pelton project, that the dams vs.
fish controversy Is highly com
plex. Too many persons take a posi
tion In favor of one side or the
other In the recurring debates
without helping to woik out a
solution that would enah us to
have extensive river develop
ments and still retain much of
our salmon and st'oclhead.
In dollars and cents, the river
fishing Industry Is not huge ex
cept In a few communities. It is
not so important to The Dalles
that wc could not get along with
out It. But we would resist efforts
to destroy all or part of It unless
it w-ore necessary to give It up in
exchange for something of great
er local and regional henefit.
Part of the fishing Industry In
The Dalles area already Is In
process of destruction as a mult
islatlve attack carried on by low
er river glllnrt fishermen. Ban
ning of seines will leave only Ce
II lo Kails as a major fishery above
Bonneville.
Because the Indian fishery at
Celilo Hnd other nearby points Is
now a. bigger business than ever,
one faction which argues against
The Dalles dam will strengthen
Its case. More monev will be at
stake at the tribal fishing ground.
The white commercial fisher
men, however, have wenkened
their argument by dividing
forces and waging another old
fashioned fish fight. Some of the
upriver sentiment against The
Dalles dam will shift toward sup
port of the protect as the union
gillnetters fasten a tight monop
oly on the Industry. To this ex
tent the Initiative measure pass
ed last fall and the defeat at Sa
lem of the fixed gear mora
torium bill represent the poorest
sort of strategy by lower river
fishermen.
In anv event. Columbia river
development la on the way and
production on the Columbia
hor the sake of a minor addi
tion to the Northwest's power
supply the permanent Impair
ment of the Deschutes svstem as
fleh ---- i .. . . 11 I
of the selfish and successful leg- nothing now on the horizon, with I extremely short sighted.
The way folks fly hither and
thither these days! So casual
about it, too, as if hopping off for
Boston or Bangkok were a mere
trifle in the day's activities. Well,
If ever I take off any place, I
shan't be casual!
I have been "up" 8,500 feet, but
my own feet were firmly pushing
against the floorboard, either
Estrellita's or her predecessor's,
and beside me "at the controls"
was EJ. (I do sometimes lay my
hand Rontly on his knee when
the drop off on my side Is a thou
sand feet or so, but I affirm, once
more, I never left any black and
blue marks!)
To be sure we flew if that is
what you do in a blimp? In the
Goodyear Resolute. It was fun.
But we never had a second
chance because Uncle Sam took It
next day.
We waited on Westwood cam
pus while the huge sausage-balloon
with Its tiny 6-passenger
cabin settled gently until the
ground-crew could grab the dan
gling ropes, and sometimes
bounce, too. We climbed a little
ladder and took our places. No
one could be afraid after watch
ing that blimp's coming down for
a landing. Not until the roar of
motors assails your ears! I near
ly jumped out of my skin. I
had forgotten, in the quiet, a
dirigible had engines!
We started up. My feet and
head nearly met in my earnest
effort to sit erect; until it occur
red to me I could lie back In my
chair, as EJ was doing, and then
It was just fun. Suddenly we
leveled out. The roar of the mo
tors (or was there only one en
gine? I forgot) ceased. There
we were floating in a blue sky
high above Southern California.
Not even a cloud to float on.
The pilot was as unconcerned
about his job as a bus-driver.
While we were shooting up he
was scribbling in a little book.
Then while we were floating he
casually rolled the blimp until
we were looking straight down
through our window. Before we
could get quite used to the idea,
he politely rolled the blimp to
port so the other half of his
passengers could look down
through their windows and find
out why we had gasped.
It was such fun! We didn't
want to come down. But I'm
still "grounder!" when it comes
to these high flying planes.
Congress Discovers Taft-Hartley Act
Not As Bad As Opponents Painted It
By JAMES THRASHER
It's up to the Senate now. But as far as the House is concerned
the Taft-Hartley Act Is still the labor law of the land. The admin
istration's compromise between brave campaign promises and prac
tical reality came too late, and the best Mr. Truman's cohorts could
do was to kill the Wood bill, a sort of super-Taft-Hartley piece of
legislation, and leave things as they were.
The last -minute compromise
was whipped up when the Lesln
ski bill was clearly doomed. This
was 90-odd percent Wagner Act,
with a few minor changes, and at
the end even its best friends
didn't give H a chance.
One of the most interesting
things in this connection Is that
the administration bill seemed to
lose ground during the Easter
vacation when most congressmen
went back to talk to the home
folks. The constituents are pret
ty good lobbyists themselves,
since they are the ones who keep
the members In steady work. And
there didn't seem to be any over
whelming evidence of a "people's
mandate to repeal the T H leg
islation. Psrhaps Truman Deceived
Mr. Truman certainly received
a people s mandate to go nacK
to Washington for four more
years. But It does not appear
that this mandate was a blanket
the possible exception of atomic
energy, will lessen the need for
completion of the major projects.
Smaller t militaries o the Co
lumbia offer a unite different
problem. The weakness of the
i'elton project on the IVschutes
is the Inadequacy of Its proposed
power output.
endorsement of everything he
promised in the heat of the cam
paign. Possibly the President, smart
politician though he is, misinter
preted the people's sentiment.
Possibly he was deceived by the
excitement and glow of victory
which persisted from election
day to the day that the new Con
gress convened. Almost certain
ly Mr. Truman was short-sighted
in consulting only with labor
spokesmen In drafting what be
came the Leslnski bill.
It was pretty well established,
even before the election, that the
Intensive publicity campaign
against the Taft-Hartley Law was
only partly successful. A great
many people bristled at Its very
name. But when poll-taker's
broke It down for them and ask
ed them what they thought of
this provision or that, it develop
ed that the hatred for the whole
greatly exceeded the hatred of
the sum ot Its parts.
Not Slavery Statute
The Taft-Hartley Law has Its
imperfections and inequities. But
it has never been the monsterous
legalization of slavery that its
opponents pictured it. In fact,
the contrast between what the
labor people said would take
the crucial issue in his victory.
So all the pressure and threats
of patronage loss were of no
avail. The administration waited
too long to pull in its horns and
offer the Sims compromise bill.
This bill, as Speaker Rayburn
said, was "about what the Lesln
ski bill should have been in the
first place." But the GOP-South-ern
Democrat coalition, with its
dander up, didn't see It that way.
Germany Likely To Be Center Of
Epochal East-and-West Struggle
By DEWITT MACKENZIE
Associated Press Foreign Affairs Analyst
The hard-boiled anti-Communist mayor of Western Berlin, Ernst
Reuter, says the New York agreement among the Big Four to lift
the blockade of the German capital marks the "real beginning of
a tug-of-war between the East and West."
Reuter means, I take it, that
Guamanlan Missionaries
The first Spanish missionaries
arrived on Guam in 1668.
we are about to see the start of
a great battle between Russia
and the Western Allies for con
trol of all Germany. It's the old
story pre-war Germany was the
keystone of much of continental
Europe's economy.
Wes Gallagher, A.P. chief of
bureau in Germany, reports that
many international observers
there believe victory for the West
would shatter the Red iron cur
tain. The reason is that Eastern
Europe traditionally has depend
ed heavily on the Reich for ne
cessities which it is doubtful Rus
sia alone can provide.
We are harking back to the
vast economic empire which Hit
ler gambled away because of his
inordinate ambition to annex and
enslave all Europe and after
that only heaven knows what.
When Hitler launched World War
II he was virtually czar of the
whole of Eastern Europe up to
the Russian border, because of
his economic strangle-hold.
I toured that whole area just
before Munich, and still find it !
a matter of amazement that the :
Nazi Fuehrer should have staked
so much on a throw of the dice, j
This strange chapter of history '
has been discussed in our column !
before, but J. revert to it now j
because it's the chief explana- (
tion of the struggle which is
boiling up over Germany. J
Hitler held all Eastern Europe
and the Balkans in the itching
palm of his hand. Why? Because
industrial Germany over a long i
period had built up an economic
structure under which she sup
plied agricultural countries with
manufactured articles, and took
from them In turn the agricultural
products which the Reich didn't
produce itself.
Phone 100
If you do not receive
your News-Review by
' 6:15 P. M. oall Mr.
Waters before 7:00
P. M.
Phone 100
' 1
a
Rev. C. D. Wood
Singing Evangelist
REVIVAL
SERVICES
At The
Free Methodist
Church
1247 Harvard Ave
7:45 p.m. Each
Evening Through
May 15
Great Singing!
Fine Preaching of Old
Fashioned Gospel
COME !
Rev. George Henderson, Pastor
A Dlplomatlo Island
The Isle of Man Is often
re
ferred to as the "British Diplo
mat Island" because it is the
same distance from England,
Scotland and Ireland.
PROMISE YOURSELF:
THAT NOTHING CAN DISTURB YOUR PIECE OF MIND
Roseburg Funeral Home
"The Chapel of the Roses"
Oak and Kane Street Rosobure. Oregon
Funerals Tel. 600 Ambulance Service
I
I. s.
MR
L. L. POWERS
Kven If a full 73 000 kilowatts i place under the law and what
of firm power were available the actually happened caused their
war around, relton could be not h- - propaganda to oacxiire. la nor
ng but an unik't taking of tern-1 a nave sustained some minor
porary Importance, hailing far I injuries, nut it also made sub-
short of long-range nivds. Its-1 stantial gains.
generators would be unneocssarv Die hysteria of organized la-
when large new units came Into 1 bor's antl-T H campaign didn't do
Mr. Truman anv good In the long
run. either. He took the keynote
of labor's campaign for his own.
But the picture of enslaved labor
was never tbeiv to hack him up.
The labor bill, In the light of suc
ceeding events, obviously wasnt
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