Roseburg news-review. (Roseburg, Or.) 1920-1948, June 27, 1930, Page 1, Image 1

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    No Cause for Pessimism over the Site j or the National Soldiers Home. "Roseburg Has Won" Says McNary's Message
WEATHER FORECAST
ORKUON: Generally lair tonight
and Saturday, but cloudy west por
tion tonight; moderate temp.
KosebuiK and vicinity: Partly
cloudy tonight and Saturday; mod
erate temperature.
WEATHER YESTERDAY
Highest temperature yesterday 74
Lowest temperature last night 52
Precipitation, last 24 hours 0
Total precip. for month .47
Deficiency since Sept. 1. IMS 9.37
Relative humidity 6 p. in. () 60
--"""---' - - - -n ILI
THE DOUGLAS COUNTY DAILY
AAfV1AAIVjV' rrf-ir--- - - - -
VOL XX NO. 140 OF ROSEBURG REVIEW
ROSEBURG, OREGON, FRIDAY, JUNE 27. 1930.
VOL. XXIX NO. 71 OF THE EVENING NEWS
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i
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Editorials
on the
Day's News
By FRANK JENKINS
-VVER and over, for years, you
have been hearing this story:
"Prohibition and Us enforce
ment are filling our prisons to ov
erflowing with offenders against
the prohibition laws."
YYERE is the truth, so far as
Oregon is concernedr
There are now 901 prisoners
In the Oregon state peniten
tiary, of which FORTY-SEVEN,
or less than FIVE PER CENT,
are serving terms for infrac
tions of the prohibition laws.
IP you listen at all to the things
that are being said around you,
hele is another story you have
heard :
"Prohibition and Its enforcement
congest our courts, leaving too
little time for all the other impor
tant business that must come be
fore them for decision."
DEFORE believing that story too
implicitly, you should sit
through a term of court, drawing
your own conclusions from what
you SEE FOR YOURSELF, Instead
of taking them on hearsay.
This writer, who has been doing
Jury duly for nearly a month,
knows by observation that "the
courts are busy, perhaps even con
gested, but doesn't believe for a
minute that they wouldn't STILL
RE BUSY, even if there were no
prohibition laws to be enforced.
ERE is what is congesting our
courts, and running up their
costs :
Too many people are coming in
to court with civil cases based on
more or less petty disputes that
ought to be settled OUT OF
COURT, and too many people are
coming into court as defendants In
criminal cases because they haven't
the GOOD SENSE and the SOUND
MORALS to refrain from violating
laws that are made for the protec
tion of society and the upholding
(Continued on pnsre 41
NEWS BREVITIES OF OREGON
(Annotated Trow
FOREST SERVICE TO USE
400 MEN IN FIRE SEASON
SALEM. Ore.. June 27. W, S.
Boyer of Portland, chief of the gen
eral land office, has recommended
the appointment of 23 men as look
outs and patrolmen for the pro
tection of Oregon forests this year,
savs a letter to Lynn F. Crone
miller, state forester. The ap
pointments will be effective July 1
and terminate September 30.
A hazardous condition exisiting
In Oregon forests until about two
weeks ago has improved Crone
miMer reports.
The state and fire patrol asso
ciations will have about 400 men
employed during the fire season,
Cronemiller said.
REFUSED Rl DFS. TRAMPS
HURL STONES AT AUTOS
COTTAGE GROVE. June 27.--"John
Doe." a transient, was in a
Eugene jail todav awaiting charges
to he preferred against him by
Onttrrlert Thim.' Eugene truck driv
er, who told authorities Doe
smashed the radiator of his truck
with a rock because he refused to
give him a ride.
While "Doe" was held In the 1all
here, rltv police received another
renort that another "John tve" aj
hnrlfne rocks at automobiles after
drivers refused to give him a ride.
RESTAURANT SORIJRRER
SHOT IN HOLDUP EFFORT
PORTLAND. June 27. Ed Miner.
32. shot in the abdomen In an at
tempted robbery of n cafp esrW
lodsy, was recovering In a hosnital
and police were roundinir no tran
sients In the vicinity. Three had
been arrested.
Miner told authorities he ws
scrubbing the floor of the cafe
when he heard someone shout
"Slick 'em up." After a second
comm-d the Intrude- fired twice,
one bullet striking Mlnpr and the
other imbedding Itself In lht door.
Egg Packery Assured for Roseburg
DIRECTORS OF
CO-OP DECIDE
Plant Will Be Replica of
Eugene Branch, Costing
$12,000; Work Will
Begin in Fall.
Association Confident of
Sufficient Product to
Warrant Project;
Stock Issued.
Construction of an egg packing
plant in Roseburg, to start in the
late fall of this year, was deckled
upon at a meeting of the board of
directors of the .Pacific Coopera
tive Producers association in Eu
gene yesterday.
J. H. Clark, Roseburg member,
stated upon his return today that
the plant will be the same size as
that in Eugene, which cost $12,000.
Because of the slow movement
of eggs, with thousands of cases in
cold storage, the directors did not
feel justified in starting construc
tion work before fall, Mr. Clark re
ported. v
E. J. Dixon. Portland manager of
the cooperative, was named chair
man1 of the committee to handle
the location and construction of
the packing plant. Other members
of the group are Mr. Clark. L. E.
Arnold, Albany, secretary; Warren
Mattson, Astoria, and Kenneth
Neilsen. Eugene.
On Cooperative Basis
The plant, when constructed,
will operate similarly to the one in
Eugene on a cooperative basis with
poultrymen forming egg pools and
marketing on a large scale. Estab
lishment of the plant here will fol
low a drive last spring and sum
mer to sign up 75.000 hens in or
der to assure a supply sufficient
to keep the packing house busy.
This quota was exceeded and al
though it has been more than a
year since contracts were made, i
is confidently felt by officers of
the county poultry association that
plenty of eggs can be secured for
marketing through the plant.
Idle Stock Taken Up
All inactive stock In the Pacific
Cooperative since January 1, 1929,
is being taken up because no new
stock is being issued. Stock
Continued on page 6, Story X
Loaned W(re
PORTLAND 'SOCK' THIEF
GETS $45 IN JOB NO. 14
PORTLAND, June 27. "The
sock," Portland's phantom robber,
was $45 richer today aftr he suc
cessfully completed his fourteenth
job by looting the Clarence Wlsh
ard garage last night.
The robber, who earned his
name because he carries a man's
sock in which to carry away his
booty, disguised himself in his lat
est robbery.
He used a sack, not a sock.
GRANTS PASS MILLS HIT
BY FIRE; LOSS $140,000
GRANTS PASS. June 28. Plans
were formulated today for the pos
sible rebuilding of the Rogue River
Box factory, destroyed bv fire last
night with an estimated loss of
$100,000.
Loss to the swede Hasin Lum
ber company, adjoining factory.
was estimated at $40,000. Origin
of the fire was undetermined.
HOME OWNERS LOSE BEER
SUPPLY IN KLAMATH RAID
KLAMATH FALLS. June 28.
Twenty:three hundred and elghtv
pints of home made beer and 170
cal'nns cf brew were destroyed rv
police today after they ratde-l the
home of A F. Morgan and Thomas
O'Kane. who were arrested. Police
refused to llstn to the men's plea
the beer was for their own use.
TRAIN DRAGS MOTORIST
150 FEET; EVADES DEATH
PORTLAND. June 27. Fred
Doyle. 28. Portland motorist, was
dra-tred 150 feet bv a sneedlng
southbound Southern Pacific pas
senger train today and lived to tell
th tale.
Witnesses s'd he dashed around
a trolley car directly Into the path
of he train.
Besides a few bniies Dovlp was
uninjured. The.accident occurred
on a crossing near here.
TO CO STRUCT
SCORES OF LIVES LOST IN
STORMS THAT HIT CANADA
AND NORTHEASTERN STATES
By the Associated Press
Scores of lives apparently were
lost in thunder, hail and rain
storms which affected several
northeastern states and provinces,
Ontario and Newfoundland parti
cularly Thursday.
The more serious aspects were:
Brdckville. Ont. Thirty were
killed on a drill boat when lightn
ing fired explosives In the rocky
bed of the St. Lawrence river.
Caproel, Ont. A 'passenger
coach on a train bound from Win
nipeg for Toronto plunged into the
flooded Vermillion river. The loss
of life was uncertain today.
Sudjmry, Ont. Several trafois
were stalled and many motorists
stranded by landslides and wash
outs after a fourteen-hour rain
fall. -
Lumsden, N. F. Three fisher
men were drowned In a hall storm
which sank 30 boats.
Upper New York state Two
were drowned at Buffalo when a
gale overturned a boat. Buildings
were unroofed. A 35,000 gallon oil
tank was fired by lightning at
(Aoc1ntKl Vnt leaned Wire)
, NEW YORK, June 27. Con
queror of Pacific and Atlantic and
just 2,500 miles from a complete
circumnavigation of the globe,
Squadron Leader Klngsford Smith
and the crew of the monoplane
Southern Cross today were honored
guests of the city of New York.
At dusk last night 6:30 standard
time the Australian flier set his
big black monoplane down at
Roosevelt field, completing a 3,000
mile flight from Port Marnock, Ire
land, an epic journey interrupted
only by a 24-hour stop for fuel at
Harbor Grace, Newfoundland.
As soon as New York gets
through telling them what heros
they are, the aviators expect to
take the Southern Cro3S on a non
stop flight to Oakland, Calif., com
pleting for Klngsford -Smith a flight
around the earth that he started on
May 21, 1928.
For sale: Southern Cross, tri-mo-tored
monoplane, Mown about 75,
000 miles but still able to laugh at
an ocean.
Owner, Squadron Leader Charles
E. Kiugsford-Smith, entirely satis
field with performance but "fright
fully hard up" and needs money so
he can be married.
Bidders apply to Kingsford-Smlth
at Oakland, Cal., airport in week
or two.
CRANBERRA, Australia, June
27. The government today was
asked, in the senate, to purchase
the Southern Cross as a national
memorial to Australia's pioneer
airmen and to further perpetuate
their memory by naming airports
and airdomes after them.
GASOLINE THIEVES
START HARD LABOR
Stealing gasoline from a parked
car across from the county court
house Wednesday night is costing
Wallace Wagner and Edward
Cram, both of Seattle, ten days of
hard labor each.
The two youths, each about 22,
were caught in the act of taking
gasoline by Deputy Sheriff George
Dietsch. They told Justice of the
Peace Charles F. Hopkins that
they were "broke" and wanted to
continue on their way south. The
justice Informed them that steal
ing gasoline was not only a had ha
bit, but a misdemeanor in the
eyes of the law and recommended
10 days of hard labor to impress
the fact.
TRAIN TRAP KILLS -WOMAN
AND CHILD
LOS ANGELES, July 27. An
elderly woman and her small
granddaughter were dead today
consequent to being trapped on a
railway bridge between two pass
ing Santa Fe passenger trains.
Mrs. Anlto Munoz, 76, was struck
and killed by one of the trains last
night. The child, Anita Munoz. 6,
died later of a fractured skull. The
tragedy occurred on the I.os An
geles river railway bridge, from
I which the little girl was hurled to
the sands forty feet below.
Olean.
Pennsylvania. Scores of build
ings were unroofed, telegraph and
power poles levelled and trees up
rooted by severe wind and electri
cal storms iu central and eastern
parts of state. A farmer hear Car
lisle was killed by a lightning bolt.
BUOCKVIU.E, Ont., June 27.
Explosion by a bolt of lightning
of several charges of dynamite
placed in the rocky bed of the St.
Lawrence river was blamed today
for death of SO men, killed when
the blast tore the drill boat, J. B.
King, to bits.
Only 12 members of the crew of
42 were rescued. These were pick
ed up by U. S. coastguard cutter
211. Several of them were sev
erely Injured and were brought to
hospitals here.
The drill boat, owned by J. P.
Porter and Sons of St. Catherines,
Ont., was engaged in blasting a
channel through Brockvllle nar
rows off Cockburn island on the
Continued on page 6, Story 2
AMAItlLLO, Texas, June 25.
Mrs. A. D. Payne, wife of a well
known Amnrillo attorney, was
blown to pieces, and her 14-year-old
son probably fatally injured to
day when the Payne automobile
was destroyed by what police be
lieve was an infernal machine.
The boy was hurled thirty feet
into the yard. The chassis of the
car was left intact and the gas
tank was undamaged.
Hitfl of wiring and pieces of dry
cell batteries were found by detec
tives, and they said they .believed
either dynamite or some other
powerful explosive had been plac
ed in the automobile.
Payne had been a candidate for
district Judge but recently with
drew. He had participated as an at
torney in several sensational mur
der cases in the Panhandle during
the past year.
ROSEBURG BAND GETS
CANYONVILLE DATE
Roseburg Municipal band will
play at the Fourth of July cele
bration at Cany onville, it was an
nounced this morning.
The hand, under the direction of
Dale Strange, will play in the par
ade and Intermittently through
out the rest of the day. A regular
band concert will be held some
time during the day.
Money received for the work on
the Fourth will be applied on the
fund being rnfsed to send the local
bandsmen to Jantzen beach to par
ticipate in the state contest, for
which a prize of $2000 has been
posted.
CAMPBELL YOUTH'S
FATE WITH JURORS
( Aworlatrri Pmi tanftpd Wlro)
VANCOUVER, Wash., June 27.
The Jury of ten men, two women
and one alternate today received
the case of Clifford Campbell, 16,
charged with killing Mr. and Mrs.
Benjamin Northrup. Clark county
ranchers, by exploding 30 sticks of
dynamite under the Northrup bed
room because they twitted him
about his studies.
The court cited four possible ver
dicts. SURPRISE HAT SWAP
DOESN'T SATISFY J.
P.
It sometimes happens that a
jurist is disrobed, but this time
one lias been "unhatted."
Charles F. Hopkins. Justice
of the peace, had a dinner at
one of the leading hotels last
.evening and came away without
his hat.
The one he wore home fit per
fectly, but It didn't, check up in
other regards with the one he
owns. W hether he took some
body else's hat or whether
somebody else took hizzoner's
kelly. the magistrate doesn't
know; but he'd rather have his
own.
7
STILL FUTURE
Establishing of Branch in
Roseburg Dependent on
Tonnage, President
Hearty States.
Market Declared in Poor
Condition ; Apple-Pear
Growers Told to
Sell Early.
Handling of this year's apple and
pear crop for Umpqua valley grow
ers was discussed by K. W. J.
Hearty, president of the Big 7 Fruit
company, who stopped here for a
short time yesterday.
The New. York man, who had
been expected to make some an
nouncement about a branch of his
concern here in the future, did not
add anything to what he had al
ready announced on a previous
visit. At that time he stated that
the ilig 7 would put a packing
house here if and when a sufficient
tonnage of fresh fruit could be
contracted to keep it In operation.
The Umpqua Valley Fresh Fruit
Growers, Inc., whose officers were
present ai yesterday a conferenc e,
r'Hl consider an offer, made by the
ftlg 7 for this year's tonnage. Their
decision will be announced the
first of next week.
Market In Bad Shape
In a summary of the hiarkot sit
uation all over the country Mr.
Hearty stated that he prefers to
face the facts and not what he
would like to think. The market,
he said, is in a had condition.
President Hoovers farm board
came in for criticism as wen as
high tariff schedules. Iloth the
farm board nnd the tariff are seri
ously affecting exports, Mr. Hearty
declared.
The result this year will be a
general lowering of prices, he be
lieves, adding that this will be par
tially induced by the bumper crop
throughout the country. This will
Continued on page 6, Story 3
LAWYER IN MERGER
SUIT KILLS HIMSELF
(Aximcliitorl I'rrttt IVnaod Wire)
YOUNGSTOWN, Ohio, June 27.
Trial of the suit for injunction to
prevent merger of the YoungHtown
Sheet and Tube company with the
Jlolhlehelm Steel corporation came
to an abrupt halt today, when L. A.
Manchester, chief counsel for the
Youngstown company, shot and
killed himself.
Motive for Manchesler's suicide
was not immediately known. He
was rumored to have opposed mer-'
ger of his company with Bethle
hem although in the trial he wa
on the side upholding the merger.
Judge David G. Jenkins -was In
formed Manchester had shot him
self as court was being opened for
the third day of the trial. Ho or
dered adjournment until Monday.
The shooting took place In Man
chester's office.
BASEBALL
NATIONAL
At Pittsburgh II. II. K.
Philadelphia - 4 32 1
Pittsburgh 6 ft 1
Bntteries: " Willoughby and Da
visj'Melne, Elliott and Ilernsley.
At Clffojnnatl It. II
E.
Boston 6 12 0
Cincinnati 7 11 1
Batteries: Seihold, Brandt, Frank
house and Spohrer; Krey, Benton
and Gooch.
AMERICAN
i (First game)
At Philadelphia II. II. E.
1st. Ixmis 8 10 3
Philadelphia 2 11 5
i Batteries: Coffman and Maulon;
Grov. Shores. C. Perkins and
' Cochrane, Schang.
r (Second game)
At Philadelphia It. H- K.
St. Louis 3 7 2
Philadelphia 8 11 0
I Batteries: Kimsey and Frrll;
Mahnffcy, Quinn and Cochrane.
At N'ow York It. II. K.
riovplnnd 11 1 "
Now York 7 12 4
Hii'tli-rUn: Hudlln, Mlllor. Jho
lonowkl nnd Myall; I'limrnH, Cnr
l roll and Dickey.
POSSIBILITY
CANNERIES
IN THE HANDS
OF
D. N. Busenbark Named to
Guide Future Business
Operations of Two
Norton Plants.
$I5,UUU Loss Ascribed to
Market Crash; $1 15,000
Worth of Products
Still on Hand.
The Frank J. Norton Canning
company, operating plants at Rose
burg and Sutherlin, went into the
hands of a receiver this mornimr.
Together with thp announcement
that a receiver has been appointed
came the encouraging Information
that a group of farmers and fruit
men are ready to form a coopera
tive and take over operation of the
canneries this season.
Immediately following the fllin
In the circuit court this morning of
a complaint asking thnt a receiver
be named. Judge J. w. Hamilton
announced the choice of D. N. H li
nen baric, prominent nnuglaa county
fruit growers and farmer.
Tn order that this season's pro
duce may be marketed and that
growers mny receive pav for last
vear's pack, the most of which in
tn the warehouse here, every effort
Is being made to secure the opera
tion of the canneries this season.
Outlook Favorable
The company owes growers sev
eral thousands of dollars for pro
duce grown last year. Willi more
than SlOO.OftO worth of canned fruit
in the warehouse nt present, it. Is
predicted In the com plaint; that
within a reasonable length of time
all Indebtedness will he cleared up
providing the canneries operate
this year.
The plaintiffs and other fruit
men believe the market will Im
prove and Hint if the canneries can
he kept going a financial wreck
will he avoided.
More than $125,000 loss was sus
tained by the company last year as
a result of depression in the mnr-
kets, Induced by tho big stock mar
ket crash and other Industrial con-'
dltions.
IT. P. Conn. C. L. Mahley, and W.
T). Hess aro tho plaintiffs in the re
quest for receivership. Tho com
plaint states that they take the
step In the interests of all fruit
growers to whom money Is duo.
Exact amount of the dht owed
growers was not announced, the
only definito figures listed being
those upon which the complaint
was based.
Mr. Norton Consents
. As an effort to do whatever he
could to "see that the growers get
their money, Frnnk Norton, head of
the company. Immediately upon be
ing served with tho papers filed a
consent to the proceedings which
cleared the wav for appointment of
a receiver. Tlv law he had ten days
In which to file his reply to the ac
tion. Assets of the concern are listed
ns J128.579.7fi for tho cannery
buildings, onuipnient nnd other real
estate and $H5,3fi1 .2H for the lf29
Continued on page 6. S'ory 4
ALMON E. ROT HIS
NEW ROTARY HEAD
f AwiortotM J'rrwi T.rflvd Wirr)
CHICAGO. June 27. Almon E.
Tlolh. Palo Alto. Cal.. today was
named president of Hotary Inter
national as the r!itlt of election?
vpstprdav In which he dffnted
Bavmond J. Knnepnel. Nw York
City, the other nominee. The vote
was 2.216 to 1.110.
STANLEY KIDDER TO
AID SWIM SCHOOL
As naid nKUlnnt to Jc.'in Khor
hart, lnflln'rtor of thn cwlnvwprk
Hpbxps nt 1'tntirtltii nark .Thiip SO to
July .r. InHilfdviv Stanley Klild
Knsphnri? hov. wan added to the
eonehinir tnff thin niornlnir.
More. reirlHlratlniiH for tile Red
CroR Bwlrnmfnir rlaHe have heen
added nnd Hliltaronlly thin year
will nee aa nmnv enrolled a lt
vear when more than H00 look Ihe
eonrKP.
Tenta for drelner ronmx will he
nlaeed on the bank of (tie river for
ihe ron'eplenre of the nwlmraer.
Dr. If. C. Church, chairman of the
campaign, announced.
ADVISOR OF TWO
PRESIDENTS, FOE
OF DRUGS PASSES
STEPHEN G. PORTER
(Autnelulpd 1'rcM Lcairil Wirp)
PITTSIIl'WSII. Juno 27. Tho
brilliant career of Stephen (i. Por
ter. 52. one of tho nation's fore
uioat statesmen, la ended.
Mr. Porter diedToday while ines
sitKes of Hollcilmlc and xympathy
poured in fiom all over the world.
The chairman of tho house of
representative foreiKU affairs com
inlltee, leader in Ihe world-wide
fisht for control of hahltforniim;
drugs, and dean of the Pennsyl
vania congressional delegation, died
cirrhosis of the liver.
Iiurlng Ihe World war President
Wilson frequenlly consulted Mr.
Porter on American v.ar policies
and President llardlnir llkewino
asked his aid In handling post-war
problems.
o
TRIAL, COURT SAYS
(AnaocialoO PrrM 1-f'niuil Wire)
l'OUTLANU, Ore., June 2. Fed
eral JmlKe M. A. Cavanah today
ruled a jury must decide whether
Itobert tiordon Duncan, self-styled
"Oregon- wildcat," used obscene
and indecent langunKe over radio
station KVKP us chanced In a fed
eral indictment, and dismissed tho
demurrer Tiled by tho defense.
No ruling was made on the plea
for a chanKO of venue.
Duncan pleaded not uuilly to the
indictment uhnncInK live specific
violations of the federal radio act
prohibiting the use of obscene and
indecent Iuukuhkc ovor radio sta
tions. The federal radio commission re
fused to renew the license of sta
tion KVKI' and owners of Ihe sta
tion soiiKht an Injunction prevent
ing the carrying out of the refusal.
374TH HOUR PASSED
BY ENDURANCE SHIP
fA'aeHttlrd I'r.-M l-.-m.-il Wire)
rillCACO. June 27 Confidence
that a new world's endurance re
fueling flight record for airplanes
was In the offing pervaded the
ground personnel at Sky Harbor
airport today as the "City of Chi
cago" passed lis 374th hour aloft
at 6:4" a. in. The two Hunter
brothers on Ihe ground said their
two biolheis In the air would stay
up us long as the engine lasted and
lhat It should lie gooil for 700
hours. Their sister today prepar
ed the Ifllll breakfast lo be taken
aloft for Ihe flying Hunter boys.
-o-
NEWELL RE-NAMED
OREGON DRY CHIEF
f Awncltitrtt I'mw l.ea"-l Win-)
WASHINGTON, .tune 27. The
depart nt of justice today an
nounced the names of the deputy
prohibition administrators who will
be In charge of Ihe enforcement
districts of the nation after the de
partment takes over the enforce
ment of prohibition on .Inly 1.
The districts, ilepulies and head
quarters Include:
Oregon. Wilbur K. Newell. Port
land: Cnllrnrnla, soulliern. W. I..
Pelers (acting), l.os Angeles:
Washington, eastern. Josenh A.
I.invllle. Spokane; Idaho, (leorce
W. Ovlear. Holse; flub.. W. W.
Mcllrlde (nellnc). Sail Lake City:
New Mexico. Charles II. Slearns.
Albuquerque: Wyoming. T.onzn C.
Davis. Clievenne: Montana, Sam A.
rtoherls. Helena: Nevada, Ceorge
W. Tlrady. Ileno: Arizona. Mlllnid
P. Coshv (acting), Phoenix.
Administrators for western
Washington nnd northern Califor
nia have not yet been announced.
CONCHC
BY THE HOUSE
IS NEXT STEP
Site Not Designated, But
Senator McNary Sends -Word
"Roseburg
Has Won."
Signature of President la
Regarded Certain, as
Group of Leaders
Backs Project.
The senate this morning unani
mously passed the hill to establish
a national soldiers' home In the
northwest.
Senator Charles L. McNary so
wired tho chamber of -commerce
here this mornlug. Indicating also
that HoseburR is the probably lo
cation for the home which con
gress has appropriated ?2,000,000,
His telegram follows:
"Very, very happy to advise
that the senate has just passed
our hill to establish a home for
disabled soldiers In one of the
Northwest Pacific states. The
action of the senate was unani
mous and occurred Immediate
ly after 1 had obtained consent
of senate to consider the cal
endar. Roseburg has won. You .
may count on my persistent
and aggressive advocacy.
Charles U McNary."
Roseburg' Hopes Bright
The hopes of Roseburg to Becuro.
(t.h homo are strengthened by tho
senator's message. In which ho
pledges his support In locating 1C
here."- " 1 v '' "" ; " "
Originating In the senate under
the hand of Senator McNary tho
bill has successfully gone over a.
number of hurdles.
It was first referred to the house,
of representatives for the reasoa
that it carried a provision for ap
proprlalion of two millions. Thd
house vpassed It on to the commit?
tee on' military affairs which re
ported favorably only after strik
lug out the definite mention of
Kosehurg as the site. Roseburg'3
name was taken out In order-to
speed up the process and push tho
bill th mil ';h this term of congress.
In the lower house the bill waft
passed and sent on to the senate
where the military affairs com
mittee considered It and reported
favorably on Wednesday of thla
week.
lly the untiring efforts ofMr-
McNary the hill was brought be
fore the senate as a whole- thta
""'nlng. receiving no opposition
whatever. ,
President's O. K. Sure
For. a number of reasons, "ttts
Continued on page 6, Story 5
ROY LYLE, AIDES
PLEAD NOT GUILTY
f Afworlntnl Pre! Irl Wirt)
RKATTLK. June 27. Roy C.
T-yle, suspended prohibition admin
istrator, his two assistants,- Wil
liam M. Whitney and Earl Corwln,
and It. L, Fryant, former prohibi
tion a';ent and deputy sherLlf,
pleaded not guilty to the recent
grand jury indictments charging
them with bribery and corruption.
In office, when arraigned In fed
eral court here today.
Prior to the appearance of Iho
accused men. Judge Charles P.
Morlarty. chief counsel for the de
fense, filed a demurrer to the in
dictments on technical grounds.
The fifth man accused, Clifford
T. McKlnney, former assistant U.
S. attorney, is under $5000 bond tc
appear !n court here Monday foi
arraignment. He was In San Fran
cisco today.
BOMB EXPLODES
IN SEATTLE P. O.
(Amx-lntpcl I'o-hi foaarri Wlr.)
SKATTI.K, June 27. Poslnl In
speclor Charles Kulherford was
busy here today, trying to solve
the mystery of a honih which ex
ploded In Terminal postoffice. near
King street station, last night.
From bits of wrappings, string and
splinters of a wooden box, Ruther
ford hoped to find out to whom the
bomb was mailed and by whom It
was sent.
The bomb, wrapped In a parcel
post package, and one of the many
being transported along a conveyer
belt to sorting tables, shattered
every window within 50 feet, hurl
ed employes to the floor, and tem
porarily deafened .lohn McKenzIo,
employe, who was standing under
the conveyor belt.
Investigators of the explosion
said the bomb was Ihe work of an
expert.