Roseburg news-review. (Roseburg, Or.) 1920-1948, June 17, 1930, Page 1, Image 1

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    A Lesson Taught: Ihe Recall
WEATHER FORECAST
OREGON i Fair tonight and
Wednesday; warmer interior Wed
nesday.
Rosebura and vicinity: Fair to
night and Wednesday; warmer
Wednesday.
,OL XX NO. 131 OF ROSE-JRG
Editorials
on the
Day's News
By FRANK JENKINS
YIERE is a plain, blunt question:
"Do you consider yourself a
Rood citizen?"
If your answer is ''yes," here Is
some plain, blunt advice: "All
right; prove it by voting at every
election that comes along."
IT IS all very fine to pose as a
good citizen, and tell people what
ought to be done and what ought
not to be done and point out the
mistakes that OTHER PEOPLE
make.
Hut don't forget this: You can't
he wholly a good citizen if you
don't get out and VOTE AT ELEC
TIONS. '"iHICAGO Incensed by Gang
Outrages." So runs a pronil-
nent headline in
a newspaper
yesterday.
These sub-heads 'follow: "Slay
ing of reporter leads to clamorous
demands for clean-up of gangland.
Police commissioner, under fire,
must get results or get out, is
edict."
RATS! Chicago is about as much
Incensed by these latest gang
mirages as you are Incensed when
l mosquito bites you.
" ' You slap viciously at the mos
quito, and then forget all about it
nntil another mosquito comes along
and gets in his work.
And so It is with Chicago and
the gang outrages.
I ET us get SOMETHING ELSE
" straight, while we are at it.
This something else has to do with
the newspapers of Chicago, which
are clamoring so loudly right now
for gangster blood and gangster
scalps; putting up a great appear
ance of civic virtue.
Here is the cold, plain, unploas
nnt truth ABOUT THAT: If these
same newspapers which are shout
ing so loudly now had been telling
the public the uncolored facts all
these years and throwing ALL' of
their great influence UNHESITAT
INGLY on the side of law and or
der, Chicago would be an Infinitely
cleaner place than it Is now.
DUT they HAVEN'T. They have
been playing politics, along
with all the others. They have
heen saying one thing in public
and doing another in private,
So the public has lost confidence
in the SINCERITY of the Chicago
newspapers, and has come to be
lieve that what they have to Ray is
dictated by policy and not by earn-
(Continued from page 2.)
NEWS BREVITIES OF OREGON
(Asaoristed PreM
EXEMPTION APPLIES TO
VET BUYING ON CONTRACT
SALEM. Ore.. June 17. An act
of the 1929 legislature exempting
old soldiers from certain forms of
taxation is operative when the sol
dier is buying land on contract and
is not yet in possession of a deed,
pays an onlnion by Attorney Gen
eral Van Winkle to Fred A. Miller,
district attorney for Clackamas
county.
1 To be allowed the exemption for
1929 the opinion holds it Is not
necessary for the old soldier or
sailor to have filed his claim on or
before April 1 of that year.
LaFOLLETT TRIES AGAIN TO
WIN LIBERTY FROM JAIL
PORTLAND. Ore.. June 17. Cir
cuit Judge Evans today was con
sidering a motion for the release of
Charles R. LaFollett. state repre
sentative from Washington county,
who is serving a jail sentence for
contemnt .of court which grew out
of his divorce hearings.
R. J. Hendricks, Salem, moved
that LaFollett be purged of the
contempt charge and be released
from Jail that he might obtain a
Job and support LaFollett's family.
The Judge said the representa
tive would not be released unless
he promised to "go to work and
give half his salary to Mrs. La
Foiled."
REVIEW
Schall
i
D. S. SENATOR
Republican Primary Result
Ends Bitter Campaign;
Wet Candidate Is
Poor Third.
Congressman White Beats
Brewster in Maine for
Senatorial Place
Held by Gould.
(Associated Prpn fouled Wire)
ST. PAUL. Minn., June- 17.
Nomination of Thomas D. Schall,
republican for a second term in the
United States senate was indicated
today when more than one-fonrth
of the state's precincts reporting
from yesterday's primary election
gave him a plurality of 25,593 over
Governor Theodore Chrlstianson,
his chief opponent.
Returns from 1.055 precincts out
of 8.69S In the state generally dis
tributed In urban and rural regions
gave Schall 80,188 and Christian
son 54,595. John F. Selb, running
on a wet platform, polled 8,745.
Schall swept the three largest
cities in the state, Minneapolis,
St. Paul and Duluth, by better than
it 3 to 2 vote and also led in' many
parts of the districts in the south
ern part. I
Governor Chrlstianson, in re
ceiving the news of the heavy
Schall vote without a sign of great
concern, admitted "there is no
doubt about the result." He ex
pressed gratitude for the voting
support given him but declined to
discuss any plans for the future.
His third term as gpvernor expires
next January 1.
Personal Fight
The campaign failed to bring
conflict between Schall and Chrls
tianson on national Issues and to a
large extent the race was reduced
to a bitter personal fight for lead
ership of the party In the state,
for which they have heen rivals
since elected to their present
posts In 1924. '
Both Schall and Chrlstianson
Continued on page 4. Story 1
MISSING EIGHT MEN
BELIEVED DROWNED
(Associated Press Leased Wire)
TOLEDO, O.. June 17. Coast
guardsmen seeking the fate of
eight missing Toledoans, missing
since Saturday when their speed
boat was found floating in Lake
Erie near West Sister island, to
day found a life preserver near the
island with a shirt bearing the ini
tials of Herbert Nauts, a member
of the party.
Finding of the shirt was taken
to indicate all of the eight men
were drowned when thrown from
the speed boat.
Letsed Wire!
SALEM ELECTS TWO TO
CITY'S SCHOOL BOARD
SALEM, Ore., June 17. Dr. H.
H. . Olinger, incumbent, and Mrs.
Roy S. Keene were elected mem
bers of the Salem school board in
the annual school election yester
day, defeating Dr. B. F. Pound and
A. H. Moore.
At a meeting of the Salem school
board last night It was reported
that ;he cot of maintaining Sa
lem's 12 -.hools during the school
year Just closed was (407,687.28.
MRS. KINGSLEY WITHDRAWS
CHARGE AGAINST H. WARD
PORTLAND. Ore., June 17. Mrs.
Anna May Kingsley. prominent
Portland divorcee, announced to
day she would withdraw charges
she preferred against Henry Ward.
Portland automobile dealer, whom
she charged with striking her .in
her home.
Ward'B trial was set for Tuesday.
LEBANON GARAGE BLAZE
INFLICTS $20,000 LOSS
LEBANON. Ore., June 17.
Smoking ruins here today
malned from the J20.000 garage
fire which struck the I.ebanon gar
age yesterday. E. E. Taylor, owner
of the building, said the loss to the
building was $10,000 and to con
tents between $10,000 and $12,000:
VIUTUF!
CHR STIANSDN
Law is Intended for Political
Iwl
Wins in Minnesota
; ; :
MINNESOTA G. O. P.
PRIMARY WINNER
THOMAS D. SCHALL
. At the state primary yesterday,
Minnesota republicans nominated
their blind senator, Thomas O.
Schall, for another term over Gov
ernor Theodore Chrlstianson and
another aspirant who ran a poor
third on a wet platform. There
was no disagreement between
Schall and Chrisliuuson on national
issues, but they waged a bitter per
sonal campaign, the climax of a six
year feud for factional supremacy.
TO TARIFF MEASURE
(Associated Press I-eased Wire)
WASHINGTON, June 17. Presl
dent Hoover today signed the tariff
hill. .
The law, revising the existing
eight-year-old rate structure iu
more than a thousand Instances
and overhauling the administration
features, takes effect at midnight
tonight.
President Hoover believes the
revised flexible provision giving
the tariff commission power to rec
commend rates for approval or re
jection by the president will afford
an opportunity to correct any un
fair rates, go a long way toward
taking the tariff out of politics and
obviate the necessity for another
congressional revision "for many
years to come."
The bill provides 1.122 changes
in present duties, including S87 in
creases and 235 reductions. More
than 250 of the advances are on ag
ricultural products Including sugar,
dairy products, grains, cattle,
meats, fruits, vegetables, nuts and
seeds.
Industrial products given rate
boosts Include textiles', in the raw
and semi-processed state, clothing
of all kinds, manganese and zinc
ores, and Bcores of other commodi
ties. Plate glass, aluminum, and
automobiles are the major prod
ucts given lower rates.
Among 48 articles taken from
the free list are softwood lumber,
cement, brick, long Btaple cotton,
hides, leathers and shoes.
Logs, now dutiable at $1 per
thousand board feet, head the list
of 75 Items placed on the free list.
$7 PROFIT WITHOUT
EXPENSE FOR LEAD
WICHITA, Kas., June 17. As 'a
motorist, struck and killed 10-year-old
John Graham's dog he noted a
menacing shotgun In the hoy's
grasp and hastily proffered a $5
bill.
"Sorry, son; will that help any?"
he inquired with a glance at the
gleaming artillery.
"Yep." the hoy said, "that makes
$7 and Its all profit, too. Shop had
taken to chicken stealing and dad
gave me $2 to shoot him."
LOVELL FINED $50
FOR BEATING WHITE
Walter Tovell, arrested recently
in connection with the fluht in
which a neighbor. W. V. White,
was seriously beaten, was yester
day finpd $50 in the local justice
court. Lovell entered a plea of
guilty to a chance of assault and
battery, and was Riven the maxi
mum sentence. He was unable to
pay tlie amount of the fine and
was committed to the county jail
for 25 days.
(( J,;- "ft
f n "
: ; V
THE DOUGLAS COUNTY DAILY
ROSEBURG, OREGON, TUESDAY, JUNE 17, 1930.
COURT WIPES
SLATE CLEAN
FOR JOSEPH
State Justices Order That
May Announcement of
Disbarment Be Not '
Put on Record.
Rehearing Petition Arrives
bn Day of Death ; State
Committee Status j
Now Problem.
(Associated Press Leased Wire) -,
SALEM. Ore.. June 17 The
state supreme court today ordered
abated the proceedings which
would have disbarred Senator
George W. Joseph, republican nom
inee for governor, who died yester
day. The court ordered that an
nouncement of his disbarment,
which was made last month, shall
not be published in the Oregon
records.
Senator Joseph's petition for a
rehearing on the case was received
by the supreme court 'yesterday,
the day of his death.
The opinion, written by Justice
Belt and concurred in by all his as
sociates, read:
"The petitioner, George- W. Jo
seph, having died since the filing
of the petition, it follows as a mat
ter of law that the proceedings
herein are abated. It is ordered
that the opinion by reason there
of, will be withheld, and it is fur
ther ordered that the same be not
printed In the official reports of
this state."
Joseph was ordered disbarred for
denunciation of several members of
the court.
Problem For Van Winkle
SALEM, Ore., June 17. Phil
Metschah of Portland has reauest
ed Attorney General Van Winkle
for an opinion whether the old
state republican central committee
existing before the May 16 pri
maries and still intact has author
ity to name George Joseph's suc
cessor as the republican nominee
Continued on page 4. Story 2
3 ARABS EXECUTED
FOR KILLING JEWS
( Asdoclatofi Prow Leased Wire)
JERUSALEM, June 17. Two
Hebron Arabs and one Safd Arab
were executed this morning at
Acre jail for murders committed
during the anti-Jewish rloiing of
last AuRust. The Arab executive
ordered the entire population to
renew their strike of protest.
Strong police forces watched Im
portant traffic centers In Jeru
salem. Arab punils of government
and Moslem schools attempted to
demonstrate near. Damascus gate
where the government and Arab
executive offices are located, and
the police dispersed them, without
use of force.
The Arab executive offices and a
number of Arab houses were
draped with black flags. While the
matter of reprieve was still open
yesterday the government received
numerous cnblegrams. including
some from German Jews, asking
mercv for the prisoners.
TodRv. after the executions, the
viewpoint was expressed nt the
Jewish agencv: "We hone it may
never he necessary again to exe
cute Arabs for murdering Jews.
3 DEAD, 4TH DYING
IN BOOTLEG FEUD
Anmcnt Prnm Tiard Wir
RAVEN A. O.. June 17. Three
men are dead and a fourth was at
the point of death here today as
the result of a shooting affray in
an alleged bootleg feud.
All the bullets were fired by one
man who turned the revolver on
himself when he feared capture by
police.
The dead are: Joseph Plnato, 40,
the allPKed Run wlelder; Kenjamln
neAnRilin, 36, and Frank DeEulis,
38.
The wounded man Is Ralph
D'Amict. 34. who is said to be the
owner of the Roxy club, where the
shoot in t? occurred.
Dinato, known as a "small
tfrae" bootleRRer, entered the club
shortly before last mldnlKht and
accused D'Amico of ca unifier police
to interfere with hira. D'Amico,
witnesses said. Ignored him. but he
emptied hlH revolver on the three
men.
Emergencies, not for Satisjaction of Imaginary Grievances
RIETS
STEPS I
E
TURKEY CO OP
Organization of Growers in
12 Western Centers Aim
of Conference Held
at Salt Lake.
Fulfilment of Plan Means
Eligibility to Federal
Aid Roseburg Man '
Vice President.
Completion of a preliminary or
ganization to be known as the
NArthwest Turkey Growers' asso
ciation, representative of twelve
turkey centers of the western half
of the United States, Is reported
bv Herbert Beyers, manager -of the
Douglas County Turkey Growers'
association, who returned last night
from Salt Lake City, where he ap
peared as a representative of Ore
gon turkey growers before the
federal farm board. Mr. Beyers
brings back the distinction of. be
ing vice-president of the newly
formed organization, which is the
first regional poultry organization
to be formed In the United States..
George W. Gustafson. of Chinook,!
Montana, was -elected- president,
and C, E. Cllne of Nevada, secre
tary. Headquarters of the associa
tion, will be In Salt Lake City.
Expansion Deserved '
The association was formed after
a three-day conference between 15
representatives selected from 60 co
operative turkey marketing organi
zations in 10 states. A preliminary
organization was perfected, and If
ratification is given by n sufficient
number of the various associations
within the territory affected, a
permanent association will be form
ed at a later date. Plans, however,
are being made for handling this
vear's crop In a series of market
ing pools.
The territory embraced by the
association was divided for admin
istrative purposes as follows:
Washington, western Oregon, east
ern Oregon, California. Nevada.
Idaho, Monlana, Utah, eastern Colo
rado, western Colorado eastern
Continued on page 4, Story 3
BROCK AND SCHLEE
TRYING LONG FLIGHT
(Associated Press Leased Wire)
JACKSONVILLE BEACH. Fin..
.Tune 17. William S. Brock and
Edward F. Rchlee took orf today
ror a round, trip flight to San
DIeo. Cal.
Brock and Schlee. who carried
450 gallons of gasoline, hoped to
reach San Diego a distance of 2.112
miles and return to Jacksonville
Bench In 24 to 30 hours.
The plane, which weighs 6.500
pounds with a full load, was ex-
necied to average 160 to 170 miles
an hour.
Fpr good luck. Schlee arranged
to wear the same pair of tan and
white sport shoes he wore whpn
another monoplano the Pride of De
troit, carried them safdv across
Ihe Atlantic ocean and Europe to
Toklo in 1927.
Brock and Schlee took off from
Harbor Grace. N. F.. August 27.
1027. and reached Tnklo Sept. 14, a
distance of 12,295 miles. -
PENSIONED WORLD
WAR DOG HERO DIES
fAsMX-lsterf Prf-ss I.rssH Wlr)
OENNISON. O.. June 17 Pre
psrstlons were made tndnv for the
mllitarv funeral of "Blue." World
war hero and the only dng said to
have been decorated for Rcrvlces
with the Amrlcnn expeditionary
force in France. Gas he inhaled in
the trenches as a nupiiv nearly T
years ago. together with his ad
vanced age. made it necessary to
chloroform him.
"Bine's" body will he Inferred In
the soldier"' plo' In VrMisvllle
fTnlon cemeterv. but his skin will
he nreservod and mounted by a
taMermist.
The doe claimed the added dis
tinction of having been Ihe onlv
canine tn receive a bonus from the
Vn'ted Ststes government, lie wss
assigned $f3 a month as a soldiers'
pension.
It was when "Bine's" nose scent
ed eas In time to ave Ihe lives of
mnnv soldiers that he was cited
and decorated.
nn
mm
BattleMWi DIRECTORS FINLAY
UNIVERSITY PREXY
HOLDS NO DEGREE
Waller Williams has risen from
a lowly printer's devil to the presi
dency of the University of Missouri
without benefit of sheepskin. Al
though he has never received a
college degree, President WillfainH
founded the Missouri School of
Journalism. At the age of fit! ho
now replaces Dr. Strutlon I).
Brooks. ' -
hum Rimes KILL
iT
(Associated Press leased Wire)
GOLDSUOHO, N. C June 17.
P. L. Flinchum, a prohibition en
forcement officer, was killed and
H. V. Andrews, number orficer,
wounded seriously early today In a
gun fight with alleged rum runners
who escaped.
Two other officers, B. A. Bale
and P. E. Street, sustained unde
termined injuries when Ihe nuto
mobile In which the four were rid
ing when fired upon was wrecked.
The officers, attached to district
enforcement headquarters at Wil
Bon, gave chase lo an aulotnoblle
Ihey suspecled to be loaded with
liquor at 3:30 o'clock this morning.
A running gun fight between the
occupants of the two machines de
veloped. Near the city park here Ihe of
ficers' enr drew alongside that of
the fugitives and in exchange of
shots Flinchum was wounded in
the head and Andrews shot through
the arm and Bhnulder.
Flinchum was driving the auto
mobile and when he was shot it
left the road and crashed into a
tree. Injuring Dale and Street.
W. C. T. U. TO HOLD
PATRIOTIC MEET
Tho Women's Christian Temper
ance union is to hold a patriotic
meeting In Ihe Woman's Club
rooms Wednesday afternoon at
2:30 o'clock with tho American
Legion auxiliary as guests. Patri
otic music; devotions, led by Mrs.
C. A. Chamberlain; a vocal duet,
by Mrs. W. M. Campbell and Mrs.
W. W. Ashcrufl; a talk by a World
war veteran: a talk on Americani
zation and the Hug, by Mis. W. M.
Campbell, and greetings from Mrs.
Felix T. McWhlrlor of Indianapo
lis, Inriiami. make up tho program.
Mrs. McWhlrter has vlslled here
several times before nnd Is an en
thusiastic worker in the W. C. T,
U. A social hour and freshments
are planned. All friends are In
vited. BASEBALL
NATIONAL
Al Boston
Cllicihuali
Boston j.
Butteries: May, 1. i-'n
and Sukeforlli: Smith,
Campbell and Spnbrer.
R. II. K.
.A 11 0
... H 14 0
iiikhouse
Brandt.
At Philadelphia R. II. K.
Pittsburgh 10 3
Philadelphia 5 11 0
(10 Innings.)
Batteries) French and
Nlcols and Davis.
Bool ;
Chicago at New York: St. Iiuls
at Brooklyn postponed; rain,
'
t
VOL XXIX
AND SHOEMAKER VICTORS
IN ELECTION OVER 2 TO 1
Total Vote of 1299 Largest Ever Recorded In
Roseburg on School Issue W. F. Harris
and Horace Berg Overwhelmingly
Chosen For Seats on Board.
Roseburg' s first recall election has passed into city political
history with the word "failure" written opposite its purpose. .
By decisive negative majorities of a ratio better than 2 to I!
out of a record school election total vote of 1 299, the electorate
of Roseburg went to the polls yesterday and rejected the pro
posal to remove Dr. G. C. Finlay and Dr. B. R. Shoemaker as
directors of the city schools.
At the same time the voters also elected for new directors
William F. Harris and Horace Berg, open opponents of the re
call movement, over their competitors, Ralph L. Russell and
John E. Flurry, whose chief support came from the ranks of the
recall proponents.
The official vote was as follows:
To recall Finlay Yes 356, no Hit.
To recall Shoemaker Yes 369,
no !MI7.
For directors (two highest cho
sen) Harris S95, Berg 845, Flurry
4tn, ltussell 390.
Hnrrls and Berg will succeed V.
T. Jackson and Btitt S. Nichols,
whose terms are expiring and who
declined to seek re-election. The
terms of the newly elected men are
for three yenrs.
The terms of Finlay and Shoe
maker do not expire until 11132.
The fifth member of the director
ate, Jack' Wharton, has still one
year to serve. I
Many Voters Too Lata
The vote In yesterday's election
was .the largest ever recorded hero
on a school Issue, a total of 1.299
effective ballots being cast. When
the polls opened nt 2 o'clock at tho
Junior high school building, there
was a line of waiting voters, two
abreast, stretched from Ihe polling
place In t'e school building to the
street. The hoard, working
rapidly as possible, passed voters
at the rate of about 2:i per hour
without a moment's Interruption
until 7 o'clock, when the doors were
closed. When Ihe polls were de
clared closed there was still a
waiting list of more than a score,
who. however, as they were Inside
the building nt the time the doom
were shut, 'were privileged to vote.
At least anolhet score of voters
came after the time had expired,
hut were excluded.
Only two other votes in the his
tory of the P.ossbura schools have
nenrlv cqmillcd yesterday's roro-l
In 1917. when heated race
Iween A. J. derides and L. A. Tll
lard for school director wns con
riuclnd. tlrn was a vote of 1,288,
and In 19211 when an ndvlsorv vote
was taken to select the site for thn
FIRE PROTECTION
SCHOOL TO BE HELD
O. C. Houser, central dispatcher
Tor the I'mpqiia national forest.
Ion tills morning for Tiller, to
make final arrangements ror Ihe
atinual training school for the Dia
mond lake and Tiller district pro
tective forces. The three-day school
starts tomorrow, nnd the short
term employes will be given a thor
ough course of Instruction In all of
the work they will be expected to
undertake. Supervisor ' Vernon
Hiupham, Assistant Supervisor
Tom Burgess. Mr. Houser, Ranger
Kenneth Mi-Reynolds. In charge of
timber surveys, and District Rang
ers Thurston nnd Hitler of the Dia
mond hike nnd Tiller districts will
conduct the school, at which 35 or
10 men will be present. A similar
school for the forces of Ihe North
rmiinun nnd Bohemia districts will
he held nt Wolr creek next week,
June 21, 25 and 211.
SWINDLER OF BANKS
GETS 2-YEAR TERM
( ,n-latt-.l I'n-M Ij-uw-U Wire)
PORTLAND. Ore.. June 17. A.
M. Ilatailon. former president of
the defunct Guaranty and Loan
company, arrested In San Fran
cisco on a charge of using Hie
malls to defraud more than 23
northwest bnnks, today was sen
tenced to two yenrs at McNeil
Island penitentiary after he chang
ed his plen from not guilty to
guilty.
I'pon motion of the a.-Hlstant
United States attorney, the court,
dismissed Ihe Indictments against
eight others, arrested In California,
Oregon and Idaho, on charges of
being Implicated with Haradon.
Ilnradnn, the federal attorney said,
assumed full blame for tho Indict
ments. His arrest grew net ol his sell
ing fictitious notes to the banks.
WEATHER YESTERDAY
Highest temperature yeeterday 6!)
Lowest temperature last ntgrt RO
Precipitation, last 24 hours........ 0
Total preclp. for month .43
Deficiency since Sept. 1, 1929 9.08
Relative humidity 5 p. m. () 41
NO. 62 OF THE EVENING NEWS
new senior high school, 1127 vote
were cast. The next nearest ap
proach to those figures was lrf
1924, when the contest for director
brought out 8(12 voters. The light
est vote on record was In 1925. .
when only 23 votes were polled.
Alignments Close
Naturally, the greatest Interest
In yesterday's election centered
around the attempted recall, which,
was overwhelmingly beaten. The
strength of the recall faction waa
practically measured by the recall
petitions, as the petitions bore 317;
names, while the largest vote wa
359. The vole for directors tallied '
closely with the results of tlie re
call. Bere- and Harris, the anti
recall candidates, receiving almost
as many votes as were cast against
the issue Itself.
The work of tallying the votes
wns a very, arduous one.ynd was
not completed until enrly this
morning. The recall votes were
first tallied, that work being com
pleted shortly before 11 p. m., af
ter which the votes for directors
were checked. Intense interest
was shown In the results, and a
large crowd remained downtowri
lo receive the bulletins furnished
by the News-Review as Ihe count
progressed. Hundreds of calls
were received at the News-Review
ofrice from residents of t,e dis
trict anxious to learn the' outcome
of the election.
TWO RESIDENCES
TAKEN BY FLAMES
Two residences, one belonging to
Al Crenson nnd the other to Mrs.
Anna Anderson, located on . East
Commercial avenue, near . Sixth
street, were destroyed by fire early
this morning. The fire started iu
the house owned by Mr. Creason,
the origin' being unknown, as the
building was unoccuplod and no
one had been seen near it. The
fire was discovered shortly after
2 o'clock by Mrs. Anderson, who,
with her son, occupied the adjoin
ing cottage. The Creason Jjulld
Ing was almost completely gone
at Ihe time the fire was discovered
and Mrs. Anderson's home - wns
binning. She roused her son, and
together they managed to save a
few articles of clothing and somo
bedding, being driven out by tho
flames before any of their furni
ture could be removed.
An alarm was sounded and tho
fire department made a quick re
sponse, hut was unable to nrrest
Hie progress of the blaze. Both
bouses were completely destroyed.
They were partially insured.
$50,000 ASKED FOR
STORM-HIT REGION
( AmwiatiHl Prr I-vaund Wirp)
HEP WING. Minn., June 17. A
Red Cross tabulation announced to
day revealed that tornadoes which
struck In Minnesota and Wisconsin
last Frldav affected 300 families
and caused damage of more than
l ODO.Onu In two states.
Mrs. K. R. Kills, national relief
chairman of the Red Cross, an
nounced the flcures In appealing to
residents of the two states to raise
$50,000 to aid sufferers Iu tho
storm districts.
Mrs. Kills' survey showed:
Seven dead and B6 in hospital
with serious injuries; scores slight
ly hurt: 40 homes destroyed. OS
badly damaged, ion barns destroy
ed. 40 damaged: thousands of
chickens and scores of head of live
slock klhi-d and hundreds of small
farm buildings razed.
Here From Riddle K. C. Onlnea.
of Riddle, editor of the South ITmp
qua News, was here today trans
acting business.
mm