The Dalles chronicle. (The Dalles, OR) 1998-2020, January 29, 2020, Image 1

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    TheDallesChronic
le.com
The Dalles
Entertainment
Update | A3
Chronicle
E N T E R TA
en te rtai
upda nm t en e t
INMENT
Wednesday,
January 29,
2020
A3
Al and
Nolan at Rivert
Live music
ap
Friday, Jan. coming up at Rivertap:
31: Al and Nolan,
covers)
6-9 p.m. (Brothe
Sunday, Feb.
rs playing
2: Sunday Night
Black Trio, 6:30-8:3
Jam featurin
g Th e Reddy
Rivertap, 703 0 p.m.
E 2nd St, Th
e Dalles; 541-296
-7870.
Barney & the
Stray Kittie
Honeybadgers,
On Th ursday
s at White Buff
alo
Friday, Feb. 7 p.m.
Saturday, 7: Nightlife, 7 p.m.
8: T-Blue,
Th ursday, Feb.
Feb. 13: Sarah 7 p.m.
Route 30 Bottles
Wild
and Brews, and the Watch, 7 p.m.
541-993-3155.
317 E 2nd St,
Th e Dalles;
Black Histor
y Month celebr
Coming up
ated
Gorge Winds
Wednesday, at the Hood River Library
seeks condu
craft activity Feb. 5: Gospel sing-alo :
Th e Gorge Winds
ctor
, 5:30 p.m.
ng
Concer
(live
new
Wednesday,
music) and
fun from volunteer Conductor. t Band is currently seeking
Feb. 12: Enjoy
traditional African
Februa
Perform
classic Jazz
while replicat
Applications ry to July, and Septem ance schedule runs a
Wednesday, fabric dyeing techniq
ber through
close Feb. 14.
ue, 5:30 p.m. ing a gorgewindsban
classics and Feb. 19: Hum along
December.
For more inform
make
d.org/conduct
Wednesday, an African Kente with Aretha Franklin’s
ors/2020-cond ation visit www.
music while Feb. 26: Listen to cloth, 5:30 p.m.
uctor-search.
lively,
creating your
Cascade Singe
Hood River
own African danceable African
rs meet; conce
mask, 5:30 p.m.
541-386-2535. County Library, 502
Cascade Singers
rts planned
State St., Hood
choir rehears
meet Sunday
River;
als for all interest
Streets, in Th s at Zion Lutheran Church
ed singers
, 10th and Union
meet on Th e Dalles, 7-8:45 p.m.
Kenny & the
ursdays at 7
One-hour work
Jeff s at Zim’s
Church. Upcom
p.m.
Live music
sessions
ing perform at First United Method
and March.
Friday, Jan. coming up at Zim’s:
ances
ist
For
are
schedu
Gale at milesm more information
Saturday, 31: Kenny & the Jeff
contact led for February
ansfi eld93@
Tuesday, Feb. 1: Kenny & the s, 7-10 p.m.
gmail.com. Miles Th oming-
Kenny Olsen, Feb. 4: Tuesday Taps Jeff s, 7-10 p.m.
& Tunes with
7-9 p.m.
Pride Book
Zim’s Brau Haus,
Al Hare and
Club meets
604 E 2nd St.,
Th e Pride Book
Feb.
Th e Dalles;
13
Club meets
7:30 p.m. to
541-296-2368.
Th ursday, Feb.
an American discuss “Becoming Nicole:
13, from 6:30-
History Forum
Th e transfo
returns Feb.
is open to all Family,” by Amy Ellis
Th e origina
Nutt. Th e Pride rmation of
persons 18
l Wasco County
1
LGBTQA literatu
Place, Th e Dalles)
years
Courthouse
re. Th e Dalles- and older interested Book Club
hosts the Region
(410 West 2nd
Court St, Th
beginning Saturda
Wasco Co. Public in reading
e Dalles; 541-296
al History Forum
y, Feb. 1, at
presentations
Library, 722
-2815.
1:30 p.m. featurin
series
from top local
mission; donatio
g
s and
Europatopia
ns accepted. and regional historia lecture
Idea to Ratifi
ns. Free ad-
Saturd
plays TD Art
Saturday, cation: Women’s Voting ay, Feb. 1: From Radica
It’s Klezmer
Center Feb.
and Beyond
Rights (Janice
l world-m
16
of Th eir Day Feb. 8: Th e Women of Sorosis
with Europa
usic band led
topia, a seven-p
: Social ‘Infl Dilg);
Center on Sunday
Rufus and the (Denise Dietrich Bokum
by Joel
uencers’
Army Camp
);
, Feb. 16, Kabakov, at Th e Dalles iece
Th e Dalles Art
McDermid);
that Helped Saturday, Feb.
Art
Center, 220 at 3 p.m. $15 suggest
Instant Comm Saturday, Feb. 22: Finding End World War 15:
E.
4th
St., Th e Dalles; ed donation.
unication in
the Wire Trail: II (Cal
and Larry McGin
541-296-4759.
the
nis); Saturd Gorge (Dave and Helen Early
Community
Guess Who
Wand
Came to Dinner ay, Feb. 29: Famou
Sings
II opens Feb.
Columbia Gorge
? (Rodger Nichols s Visitors:
21
Orchestra
Choir and Audien
).
ce Singalong Association presents
Mardi Gras
the
at
Voci
the Wy’East
party Feb. 8
Performing
Transport your
Arts
Kitties return , Jan. 30, from 6-8
blues season to the White Buff alo, p.m., Barney & the Stray
with country
Wines, 4040 ed with rich vocal harmon
rock and
Westcliff Dr.,
Hood River; ies. White Buff alo
541-386-5534.
Al and Nolan
at Everybody’
s Brewing
‘Prohibition
s’ at Route
30 Jan. 31
Cheer
squad pulls
off double
win | A9 ▶
‘Quittin’ Time’
is the latest
CD release
from America
singer/songwrit
na
Alder. Featurin er
Megan
g six original
songs of
“sweet romanc
and bottoml
e
ess heartbr
Alder’s
eak,”
infl
from traditio uences range
ful pop. Her nal jazz to soul-
The Woods, touring band,
sound with rounds out the
Her next bass and drums.
Gorge show
Slopeswell
Cider Co. in is at
River, on
Hood
Saturday,
Jan.
Photo by Jim 29.
Drake
Trivia Fundr
aiser
at pFriem
Th e Hood
History Trivia River County Library Founda Jan. 29
tion Literary
6-8:30 p.m. Fundraiser will be held
and
four; or join at pFriem Family Brewer Wednesday, Jan. 29, Local
from
s. Th ere will
trivia game. a team. Please bring a phone
be teams
Proceeds will
or tablet to access of
Library Founda
be donated
the
Brewers, 707 tion. $10 suggested to the Hood River County
donation. pFriem
Portway Ave,
Hood River;
541-321-0490. Family
Performing
Sunday, Feb. Arts Center on Friday,
Feb. 21 (7:30
cepted. Wy’Eas 23 (2 p.m.) Free admiss
ion; donatio p.m.) and
Wy’east Rd, t Middle School Perform
ns gladly
Hood River;
541-354-1548. ing Arts Center, 3000 ac-
Entertainment
alleschronicle.c listings should be
e-maile
om by 5 p.m.
Friday, and d to jdrake@thed-
run as space
allows.
Ride
THE LINK
Public Transi
t
The Dalles
Bus
ONLY
$ 50
1
• The Dalles
Stops
Transit Center
•
• Columbia
Gorge Commu Near Goodwill
nity College
• Mid Columb
ia Medical Center
• Veterans Service
one
way
Offi ce
Cal l 541-
296
MCEDD
.org/lin -7595
ktransit
Midweek
$1.00
January 29, 2020
The Dalles, Oregon
www.thedalleschronicle.com
Vol. 229, Issue 9
Data helps game management
Salvage of road-
killed deer expands
understanding of
Oregon herds
Sacon
■ By The Walker
Dalles Chronicle
Certified Wasco County Gardner
Megan Wickersham now heading up
Gorge program. Contributed program
Wickersham
to lead
program
Walker
■ By The Trisha
Hood River News
Megan Wickersham began
her new position as education
program assistant for Hood River
County Extension and coordinator
of its Master Gardeners Program
on Nov. 25. She has an insider’s
perspective, having been through
the Master Gardener program
herself—twice.
“I was certified as a Wasco
County Master Gardener in
2018 and again in 2019,” said
Wickersham. “During that time,
I was working part time and
volunteering with several commu-
nity projects, including a school
See GARDENER, page A4
Parties
argue
session
intent
Residents of Hood River, Wasco
and Sherman Counties legally
harvested 18 road-killed deer from
local lanes and highways in 2019.
Oregon Department of Fish
and Wildlife biologist Andrew
Rosenberg said this was a typical
return for ODFW’s central and
eastern field offices in the first
year of legal roadkill harvesting in
Oregon.
Rosenberg said most of the 1500
permits issued statewide were
issued on the west side, with Bend
and Prineville being exceptions.
“Heppner and Summer Lake
have only checked in a total of 10
between the two of them, so those
rural areas with not many roads
and not many people aren’t getting
very many check-ins,” Rosenberg
said.
ODFW District Wildlife Biologist
Jeremy Thompson said the west’s
higher permit numbers were large-
ly a result of higher population
densities.
“Summer Lake is one of two
offices in a county of 6000 people.
Half of those 6000 are cattle ranch-
ers that probably don’t want to eat
roadkill deer,” Thompson said. “It’s
a sheer people-volume issue.”
In addition to the obvious
benefit of meat which would have
been laying by the road ending up
on the table, these permits provide
new data points to ODFW.
Rosenberg said the deer heads
which are turned in to ODFW
Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife biologist Andrew Rosenberg works out of his office in The Dalles. After a year of
legal salvage of road-killed deer and elk, biologists are finding the data collected statewide useful.
Walker Sacon photo
field offices as the final step of the
permitting process provide useful
samples to biologists following the
westward spread of chronic wasting
disease.
“All of the heads that we’re check-
ing in, we’re sampling for CWD and
it’s a great way for us to boost our
monitoring effort for that disease,”
Rosenberg said.
Chronic wasting disease,
Rosenberg said, effects cervids, or
members of the deer family. “This
isn’t something that we’ve found
in Oregon,” he said. “I don’t think
it’s in a state that touches Oregon
but they have it in Montana and
it’s starting to kind of move west so
it’s something that we monitor for
pretty heavily.”
See PARTIES, page A5
INSIDE
Monitoring for CWD in Oregon
means ODFW can more quick-
ly and effectively respond if the
disease reaches Oregon, Rosenberg
said. He said the roadkill salvage
program boosts biologists’ samples
for the disease.
Before the roadkill salvage pro-
gram, ODFW relied almost entirely
on hunters for their monitoring
efforts. Sampling from the annual
harvest took place in the field and
at check-in stations for hunters in
Prineville and Biggs Junction.
Rosenberg said biologists “do a
lot of running around all over the
state” to check hunters for kills and
ask for a sample.
See GAME, page A5
Mixing up the media
Led by artist in residence
Marwan Nahlé, a Lebanese-born
painter, multimedia artist and mu-
sician, adults, teens and children
alike have been exploring the ex-
pressive world of collage, paint and
recycled art throughout the month
of January at The Dalles-Wasco
County Public Library.
The series of six workshops are
nearing their conclusion, with
an adult recycled art workshop
6 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 29 and
Mediterranean Cuisine 6 p.m.
Thursday, Jan. 30.
The Mediterranean Cuisine
program
Proponents say
short session
is to fix budget
and and address
crisis. Critics say
it’s morphed into
something else
Claire Withycombe
■ By Oregon
Capital Bureau
SALEM—You could say that
Oregon is a bit “odd.”
Until 2012, the state’s legislators
only met in odd-numbered years,
a practice dating to 1885.
But the sessions got longer as
lawmakers grappled with issues
facing a growing state. By the
1980s, the average session lasted
six months, according to the secre-
tary of state’s office.
In 2010, voters said “yes” to
allowing annual sessions—and
limiting the number of days in
each session. So now, in every
even-numbered year, lawmakers
and lobbyists descend on the
Capitol for a “short session” of up
to 35 days.
Confused yet?
In the 10 years since voters
approved the change, the short
session has provided something
Rosenberg said typical symptoms
of late-stage CWD include obvious
malnutrition and odd behavior. “It’s
going to be salivating, stumbling
around and it can have a weird pos-
ture,” Rosenberg said. The disease is
eventually fatal.
Thompson said chronic wasting
disease is a prion disease similar
to mad-cow disease or Creutzfeldt-
Jakob disease in humans. It spreads
by becoming prevalent in deer hab-
itat to the point where they end up
ingesting it. “We’re trying to make
sure that prion just does not enter
our system,” Thompson said.
Rosenberg said the prion builds
up in the environment around in-
fected populations until it is spread
through feces and saliva.
Paint, scissors and jewels were
being incorporated into mosaic
art by those attending the art-
ist-in-residence workshop. Above,
Aela, 13, soaks an item in paint for
her colorful project. Above left,
Honore, 15, trims pictures for her
collage. The class is taught by
Lebanese-born painter Marwan
Nahlé, at left.
Anastasia, 11, of The Dalles, above, works on a mixed-media project during a
teen artist in residence program with artist Marwan Nahlé at The Dalles-Wasco
County Library Jan. 24.
Mark B. Gibson photos
Senior News
Entertainment
Obituaries
A2
A3
A5
will be a demonstration of the
Mediterranean style of cooking, a
part of Nahlé’s Lebanese heritage.
Nahlé has lived and worked inter-
nationally since 1988, and currently
resides in Hood River. He was a res-
ident artist for “What The Festival,”
living in Dufur, and often works in
The Dalles. He said his paintings
represent his lifelong physical and
spiritual journey, combing forms
and landscapes from his world
travels into ethereal and mystical
movements.
One of the main mediums and
themes in his mixed media work is
to use recycled materials to create
playful and imaginative collages
and sculptures from discarded toys,
metal scraps, plastic debris, roots,
fossils, branches and images.
Comics
Marketplace
Sports
A7
A8
A9-10