The nugget. (Sisters, Or.) 1994-current, March 29, 2017, Page 20, Image 20

Below is the OCR text representation for this newspapers page. It is also available as plain text as well as XML.

    20
Wednesday, March 29, 2017 The Nugget Newspaper, Sisters, Oregon
LETTERS
Continued from page 2
Comparing skydiving to other routine airport
uses, such as use by a local pilot or a pilot vis-
iting for a weekend, is comparing apples to
oranges.
The noise problem created by skydiving is
very real to many people in this community,
regardless of whether they live adjacent to
or miles from the airport, and is increasingly
becoming an issue of concern for others con-
sidering moving to Sisters. I believe the air-
port is either misinformed or has more options
available to address and resolve this problem
than it is willing to acknowledge.
David Adler
s
s
s
To the Editor:
Last week’s coverage of the “Major Blaze”
included a captioned photo of a water tender
(“one of those that made relays…”) employed
in the attempts to suppress the fire.
I must conclude that a high desert, hard
rock, domestic water well was incapable
of producing sufficient volume to quell the
flames of a 17,000-square-foot, wood-frame,
single-family residence.
What might be learned from this unfortu-
nate event?
John Grant
s
s
s
To the Editor:
I would like to address some of Mr.
Mackey’s comments and concerns brought
up by his letter to the editor on March 15. In
regards to his taking exception to those apply-
ing the word “Nazi” to our present administra-
tion, I would suggest he look up the website
for The United States Holocaust Memorial
Museum in Washington, D.C. After perusing
the list of “early warning signs of an encroach-
ing fascist government’ displayed thereon, I
would suggest Mr. Mackey see how many of
those signs have already been checked off by
President Trump’s comments and edicts.
A prior response to Mr. Mackey’s claims
about the number of people detained due to
the travel ban has already been put forward,
but I might add that why has it not been blar-
ingly brought out that the majority of the ter-
rorists who perpetrated 9/11 were from Saudi
Arabia — a country which was not banned,
and which undoubtedly has large financial
dealings with the Trump empire. Finally, it is
unconstitutional to discriminate based on race
and religion.
In regards to outrage about underfund-
ing of veterans — I agree, and congress did
attempt to pass a bill to increase financial
aid to veterans; unfortunately, the bill did
not pass due to the fact that the Republicans
attached a provision to it that funds be cut
to Planned Parenthood, an organization that
gives mostly under-served women life-sav-
ing tests. Clearly, it was more important to
the Republicans to defund PP than to help
the veterans who also needed life-saving
procedures.
Finally, Mr. Mackey, if women marching
in protest of our present administration are
wearing hats with representations of vaginas,
perhaps one of the many points they are trying
to bring home is the fact that they feel they
are in danger of losing the right to make deci-
sions concerning their own bodies, and their
reproductive choices. And there is no worry
that you will have to “envision a similarly
orchestrated men’s march,” as men do not
now, nor have they ever, had to worry about
their reproductive rights being similarly in
danger.
Michelle Tormey
s
s
s
COMMANDER: First
national commander
from state of Oregon
Continued from page 1
Legionnaires have been
giving back to their country
and fellow veterans since the
organization was founded in
1919. Schmidt noted that it
was a legionnaire who crafted
the GI Bill, which enabled
so many veterans to achieve
home-ownership and college
education. The American
Legion is also a significant
advocate for veterans’ health
issues and supports the
Veterans Administration in
providing health services.
Schmidt recently testi-
fied before the U.S. Congress
to promote the American
Legion’s legislative priorities.
Schmidt transferred his
American Legion member-
ship to Harney County Post
63 in Burns,when he moved
to Oregon for a 15-year career
at the Greater Oregon Federal
Credit Union. He retired from
the credit union as the execu-
tive vice president.
For Schmidt, his high
degree of commitment and
level of service boil down to
the simple principles of the
American Legion: Veterans
service veterans and veterans
continuing to serve America.
I think there’s still
that love of country,
in addition to making
sure your buddies
are taken care of.
— Charles E. Schmidt
“I think there’s still that
love of country, in addition to
making sure your buddies are
taken care of,” he said.
Classifieds are online at
NuggetNews.com
Enjoy the
fl avors
of spring
YOUR YEAR-ROUND
IRRIGATION EXPERT
Class preps volunteers
to bentor children
Central
Oregon
Partnerships for Youth
(COPY), a program of the
Deschutes County Sheriff’s
Office, is offering a class to
prepare volunteers to become
mentors for children with an
incarcerated parent.
After initial training
and comprehensive back-
ground checks, volunteers
are matched with children
in Sisters that share similar
interests and activities and
commit to spending a few
hours a week together for a
minimum of one year. This
time is often spent going to
community events, working
on homework, attending art
programs, participating in
sports, or simply hanging out
and talking.
On Saturday, April 8,
COPY will offer an orienta-
tion/training class. This six-
hour class covers program
policies, how to establish
a mentor relationship, the
impact incarceration has on
families, and communica-
tion skills. There is no cost to
attend, but advanced registra-
tion is required. This will be
the last training class offered
until the fall. For more infor-
mation call 541-388-6651 or
email COPY@deschutes.org
Additional program infor-
mation is available at the
Sheriff’s Office website at
www.sheriff.deschutes.org/
copy.
Backfl ow Installation
& Testing
Winterization
Nelson Horse
Waterers
Underground Field
Irrigation
Residential Irrigation
Services
— Serving Breakfast & Lunch —
Gluten free and vegetarian options always available
Open Every Day Except Wednesday, 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.
403 E. Hood Ave. | 541.549.2699
miller
I R R I G A T I O N
541-388-0190
LCB#8234
SISTERS HABITAT FOR HUMANITY
Thrift Store
We are overloaded
on BOOKS, BOOKS
and more BOOKS
ReStore
50% OFF
Lamps, Lumber
SO THEY ARE and Luggage
1/2 PRICE! La, La, La,
Come on down!
541-549-1740
Lovely!
541-549-1621
541
549 1
141 W. Main Ave., Sisters
254 W. Adams Ave., Sisters
Hours: Mon.-Sat., 9 a.m.-5 p.m.
Sunday, 12-4 p.m.
Donations accepted
Mon.-Sat., 10 a.m.-4 p.m.
Hours: Mon.-Sat., 9 a.m.-5 p.m.
Closed Sundays
Donations accepted
Mon.-Sat., 10 a.m.-4 p.m.
Welcome, Spring
Break Visitors!
SOUP OF THE DAY
March 29th - April 4th
Wed ..............Caulifl ower Cheese
Thurs .............. Mexican Chicken
Fri ....Clam Chowder & Vegetable
Sat......................Jalapeño Potato
Connect with
us for great
specials!
Sun ................ Chicken Vegetable
Mon ........................ Tomato Rice
Tues ............... Chicken Tortellini
Orders to go
welcome
Breakfast & lunch 6:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.
Nightly dining until 10 p.m. (21 & over)
171 W. Cascade Ave., Sisters | 541-549-2631