The nugget. (Sisters, Or.) 1994-current, February 22, 2017, Page 10, Image 10

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    10
Wednesday, February 22, 2017 The Nugget Newspaper, Sisters, Oregon
Sisters author ventures UO considers undergraduate Study finds
state needs
tuition hike of 10.6 percent
out on the frontier
Jim Cornelius will read
from and discuss his book,
“Warriors of the Wildlands:
True Tales of the Frontier
Partisans,” at Paulina Springs
Books on Saturday, February
25, at 6 p.m.
“ Wa r r i o r s o f t h e
Wildlands” is a collection
of 12 biographies, focusing
on an eclectic set of indi-
viduals who operated on the
world’s wild and dangerous
frontiers. The book covers a
broad spectrum in time, from
the 1770s through World War
I, exploring subjects such
as Simon Kenton and Blue
Jacket on the early Ohio fron-
tier, to Al Sieber and Pancho
Villa on the U.S./Mexico
borderlands.
The book also explores
the lives and legends of the
African frontier experience,
such as Deneys Reitz, a Boer
commando, and Frederick
Selous, a hunter and soldier
in the African wilds. The
book is an in-depth, gripping,
and historically valuable look
into the lives of some of those
who lived on the edge of civi-
lization, and in many ways
helped shape the future.
The Frontier Partisans pio-
neered what we now think of
as special-operations warfare.
“Most of the book’s sub-
jects were not professional
soldiers,” Jim says. “They
were highly skilled guys who
applied fieldcraft and hunt-
ing skills in warfare from the
PHOTO BY LYNN WOODWARD
Canadian prairies to Mexico
to Africa. When people think
of the frontier they often
think of North America, but
the phenomenon was similar
all around the globe.”
Cornelius will read
excerpts from “Warriors of
the Wildlands” and discuss
the similar character of the
frontier experience around
the world, including difficult
issues such as race, coloniza-
tion and conquest.
“I’ll probably close with a
tune or two — originals I’ve
written inspired by frontier
stories,” Cornelius says.
Paulina Springs Books is
located at 252 W. Hood Ave.
There is a cover charge of $5
per group at the door. If you
buy the featured book, your
$5 will be refunded off the
price of the book.
For more information
contact Cornelius at 541-
390-6973 or Paulina Springs
Books at 541-549-0866.
EUGENE (AP) — The
University of Oregon is
considering raising in-state
undergraduate tuition by
10.6 percent in the fall to pay
for increased salaries, health
care and retirement costs for
school employees.
T h e R e g i s t e r- G u a rd
reports that under a plan
backed by UO President
Michael Schill, annual
tuition for full-time, in-
state undergraduate stu-
dents would increase $945
as of the 2017-18 academic
year. Mandatory fees would
also increase $186. Out-
of-state tuition would also
increase by $945, or three
percent.
An in-state undergraduate
student taking 15 credits per
term would pay $9,855 for a
three-term school year under
the proposal. The student
would also pay $2,037 in
fees. An out-of-state student
would pay $34,572 in tuition
and fees.
Schill said in a letter to
students and staff that the
state’s fiscal problems leave
him little choice but to accept
the major tuition increase. He
said UO’s operating expenses
are rising steadily. In particu-
lar, retirement benefits under
the state Public Employee
Retirement System are
requiring large contributions
from the university.
“I wish it were not nec-
essary for us to increase
tuition by these significant
amounts,” Schill wrote. “Yet
the state’s fiscal problems
leave us no choice.”
The proposed increase
comes after years of steadily
rising tuition and fees for
both in- and out-of-state stu-
dents. However, the proposed
10.6 percent tuition increase
is above the 8.3 percent aver-
age annual tuition and fee
increase for in-state students
for the past decade.
I wish it were not
necessary for us to
increase tuition by these
significant amounts.
— Michael Schill
Last year, UO trustees
raised tuition 4.8 percent for
resident students and 4.5 per-
cent for out-of-state students,
sparking student protests.
The UO Board of Trustees
must approve the tuition
hike. They will consider the
proposal March 2-3.
revenue for
pension costs
PORTLAND (AP) — A
new study from Portland
State University suggests that
a rise in compensation costs
for Oregon’s public employ-
ees could lead to a reduction
in the number of people pro-
viding key public services.
The
Oregonian /
OregonLive reports that
according to a study from
PSU’s Center for Public
Service, compensation costs
are outpacing projected rev-
enue growth. Without new
revenue from somewhere like
new taxes, state government
employers will have few
options other than reducing
their workforce by as much
as 10 percent.
The study found that the
cost increases are largely
driven by the spike in
employers’ required con-
tributions to the state’s
underfunded pension sys-
tem, which are expected to
double as a percentage of
payroll over the next five
years.
Frontiers In Science
MONTHLY SYMPOSIUM IN SISTERS
WOLVES IN
YELLOWSTONE:
THE ROLE OF AN APEX PREDATOR
Concerned
about
MOISTURE in
your home
due to
ICE DAMS?
Call Central Oregon
Home Inspections
for an assessment
Fred Woodworth
CCB#159014
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Tuesday, February 28
At The Belfry, 302 E. Main Ave., Sisters
One-hour lecture begins at 7 p.m.
Doors open at 6 p.m. for
food and beverage.
miller
I R R I G A T I O N
Dr. Robert Beschta is Professor
Emeritus, Forest Ecosystems and
Society, College of Forestry at Or-
egon State University. He will be
speaking about how the removal and
recovery of wolves can have a major
role in shaping an ecosystem via tro-
phic cascades. Most of his presenta-
tion will focus on what has happened
in Yellowstone over the last century, but he will include stud-
ies from other areas across the American West.
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M-F
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5, S
Sat.
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Closed
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Sundays
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440 N. Pine St. • 541-549-8141 • www.hoyts.net
Admission: $5;
Science Club Donors,
Teachers and
Students - FREE
Bring your curiosity and an appetite for food, drink & knowledge!